Property Damage & Disaster Restoration Blog: Long Island & New York City

Emergency Water Extraction Services: Long Island and New York City

Posted on Fri, Nov 18, 2011 @ 09:47 AM

water extraction,water removal,long island,new york city,drying equipment,response time,emergency services

One of the worst things that can happen is having an insurance claim due to a pipe break or water heater malfunction that causes a water intrusion to flood your basement or saturate your home or office.  Advanced Restoration's Disaster and Emergency Response Time minimizes the property damage that can be caused by a flood.  Our emergency water extraction services have assisted many homes and buildings throughout Long Island and New York City. 

We Perform Emergency Water Extraction / Water Removal Services Due All Forms of Water Instrusions.

Whether it is standing water or water trapped in the building materials, it is 500 times faster to physically remove the water by extracting than it is to evaporate it using structural drying equipment.

Why Thorough Water Extraction / Removal Is Necessary:

  • Reduces the overall costs for complete restoration

  • Minimized the chance of future mold growth

  • Reduces the need to replace saturated building materials including carpet, padding, and sheetrock

  • Claims get closed faster

  • Reduces the disruption of the home or building owner

Increases customer satisfaction

Advanced Restoration's Emergency Water Extraction Crew
 
 
More Water Extraction Performed by Advanced Restoration
 
 
 

 

Tags: disaster, extraction, wet building materials, drying equipment, response time, long island, water damage, structural drying, emergency, water extraction, water removal, new york city

Hot Stat: Today's Homes Burn Faster Than Ever

Posted on Mon, Nov 14, 2011 @ 08:34 AM
It may sound like a cliche to trot out fire safety tips before the holiday season, but if there's one statistic that bears repeating, it's this: Even with adequate smoke alarms, a house fire today can become uncontrollable in less than three minutes.

That's down from an average 17 minutes in 1975 -- a whopping 82 percent difference.

And the reason for the drastic change, according to a report by the National Institute of Standards and Technology, isn't just the type of house you live in, but what you put inside.

"It's not how old the home is, it's the furnishings," Jack Watts, Director of the Fire Safety Institute, told AOL Real Estate.



A spokesperson for the National Association of State Fire Marshals told AOL Real Estate that the worst culprit in home fires is upholstered furniture, because it often contains highly flammable polyurethane foam. These all-too-common materials provide the fuel for what fire experts call the flashover -- the point at which everything in the room simultaneously bursts into flames. It doesn't help that many of today's homes are built with more open floor plans and modern building materials like wallboard that can lead to faster fires, according to the Wichita Eagle.

The numbers show an alarming trend. In 1977, the first year when data was available, there were 750,000 residential fires, according to the National Fire Protection Association. In 2010, there were roughly half that many, thanks in large part to widespread use of smoke detectors. But the incredible speed with which home fires can spread in today's homes represents a major step backward in fire safety.

The Hot Topic of Sprinklers

The next step in home fire safety, a spokesperson for the NASFM said, is to require fire sprinklers in new residential properties. Homebuilders bristle at the idea due to the high cost of installation. The national average cost to install sprinklers is $1.60 per square foot, according to the Wichita Eagle. In a 2,000-square-foot home, that comes out to about $3,200.

Another barrier is public opinion. As we reported last year, when given the choice between granite countertops and fire sprinklers, respondents overwhelmingly chose the countertops, according to the National Association of Home Builders.

(To find out if your state requires fire sprinklers in new construction, check out the Fire Sprinkler Initiative website.)

Worse still, there are only voluntary flammability regulations for upholstered furniture. Implementing a nationwide standard would go a long way in protecting consumers from purchasing dangerously flammable furnishings, the NASFM spokesperson said.

Regardless of what state legislators decide, though, it all comes down to vigilance, says Fire Safety Institute Director Watts.

If you'll be using a live Christmas tree this holiday season, make sure to water it regularly and keep an eye on any decorative lighting and candles. And, as always, make sure your house is equipped with working smoke and carbon monoxide detectors. For a terrifying glimpse at a Christmas tree "flashover," watch the video above. 

Tags: long island, fire, burn, fire safety, new york, building materials, holiday season, safety

Building Deconstruction: Giving Building Materials a Second Life

Posted on Fri, Nov 04, 2011 @ 10:28 AM

As a baby boomer who has spent over 35 years in the architectural and real estate development professions, I'm aware that the current economic downturn has made many of my peers revaluate where they are going in both their personal and professional lives. Some have regretfully waived the defeat flag and headed for retirement. Others have reinvented themselves in second careers, and in so doing given themselves exciting new lives.

In an analogous rebirth, perfectly good building material that once would have been buried in a landfill is now enjoying a second life through creative reuse.

Building-materials reuse was once considered the backwater of do-it-yourself homeowners on a limited budget. Today reuse serves a vital role within the mainstream of state-of-the-art design and construction, in both the residential and commercial sectors of the industry. This trend is driven by building professionals and building owners who have become more conscious of the financial and environmental benefits of materials reuse and the potential tax benefits of choosing deconstruction over demolition.

In California, an entirely new driver is the new CalGreen Building Code, adopted in 2011. Although building industry professionals have mixed opinions of the code, it is now the law. The code mandates requirements that encourage the adaptive reuse of materials and, in some municipalities, actually offer developers and owners incentives for creatively reusing building materials. Although the code only affects construction in California, a similar set of codes and mandates is in the works with the International Code Council, which will affect the majority of states when adopted over the next few years.

The reuse of building materials falls into three basic categories:

1. Conventional reuse of materials
2. Adaptive reuse of materials
3. Recycled content reuse of materials

The conventional reuse of building materials involves building or remodeling with materials salvaged from older structures. One of my favorite examples is the "Big Dig House." The Big Dig was one of the largest infrastructure projects in North America in the late 20th century and involved the creation of a major loop transportation system around the city of Boston. The Big Dig House was constructed with over 60,000 pounds of salvaged material from structures that were demolished or deconstructed in the path of the Big Dig. The final construction cost was approximately half that of a comparable custom home built with conventional new materials.

The Big Dig House, Boston, MAThe Big Dig House, Boston, MA

Adaptive reuse involves salvaging a material that was used for one purpose in its original structure and reusing it for a different purpose within a new or remodeled structure. For example, a glass curtain wall from a commercial building might be used to create a new residential sun room. A more spectacular example is the Malibu "Wing House" in which architect David Hertz used wings from a retired 747 jetliner as the roof of a new custom home.

The Wing House, Malibu, CA

Taking Hertz's vision to the extreme is a custom hotel suite in Costa Rica constructed from the entire fuselage of a recycled 727. If planes could talk, this one would tell you what a great second life it's having at the beach!


 

The third and final category of building material reuse is recycled building material content, which involves taking previously used material and, through some type of manufacturing process, turning it into new building material. This is an exciting niche within the building industry that has inspired both small entrepreneurs and Fortune 500 companies to come up with new products made from old products.

New counter tops made from recycled wine bottles New counter tops made from recycled wine bottles

 

Blog Post Written by Wally Geer of The ReUse People of America.  And posted on their Velvet Crowbar Blog

 

Tags: material reuse, salvaged building materials, conventional reuse, building deconstruction, sustainable, deconstruction, reuse

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