Property Damage & Disaster Restoration Blog: Long Island & New York City

Filing An Insurance Claim Could Cost Homeowners Down The Road

Posted on Mon, Feb 27, 2012 @ 12:51 PM

LITTLETON, Colo. (CBS4) – Many people are spending the weekend picking up debris in their yards from the wind and snow. But with so much damage, homeowners are wondering if they should file a claim with their insurance company.

Most homeowners’ policies have coverage for wind damage. But what they must decide is whether it is worth filing a claim because it could really cost them.

The wind slapped Christy Wheeler’s Littleton home hard this week. The siding was ripped off, a section of the backyard fence is gone, and shingles were torn from her roof. Wheeler wasted no time calling in an insurance claim.

 

“I know definitely this is going to cost more than our deductible,” Wheeler said.

Her deductible is $1,000.

By the next morning State Farm claims agent Bob Blume was at her home. He measured and documented the damage. The roof is likely the most expensive part of the claim, but the snow posed a problem.

“The roof cannot be properly inspected by an insurance adjuster until it’s clear and dry,” Blume said.

It’s not clear how much all of the damage will cost to fix. But Wheeler estimates just the roof will cost about $5,000 or $6,000.

When filing a homeowner’s insurance claim insurance expert Carole Walker offers caution.

“If someone is filing a lot of smaller claims over a short period of time, that could put them at risk for losing insurance, because what the insurance company is looking at is how high risk are you,” Walker said.

Walker says it’s not the amount of the claim, it’s the number of claims. The average homeowner files one claim every 8 years.

The Wheeler family will wait for the snow to melt and the roof to dry and the claims agent to return for a total damage estimate.

Those who have a $1,000 deductible and the total damage is $1,200, the homeowner pays $1,000 and the insurance company only pays $200.

“The difficulty is we’re in an economy where a couple hundred bucks is a lot,” 4 On Your Side Investigator Jodi Brooks said. “But consider; we still have hail season ahead of us, and two or three claims could cost you in homeowner’s insurance premiums, or losing your insurance. It’s not an easy decision.”


Tags: property damage, insurance, insurance claim, insurance company, filing a claim

Flood and homeowner's insurance are not deductible

Posted on Fri, Feb 24, 2012 @ 09:35 AM
 
 
 Q. I understand there is a tax deduction for mortgage insurance, provided that your income is less than $100,000 per year. Are flood insurance and home insurance also deductible if your income is under $100,000?

Mortgage insurance premiums paid on your personal residence or second home would be deductible as an interest deduction on Schedule A (itemized deductions) on Form 1040. The deduction phases out once your adjusted gross income (AGI) exceeds $100,000 for single and joint filers and $50,000 for married filing separately.

Flood and homeowners insurance are not deductible unless a portion of your home is used for business (for example, a two-family house). Based on the percentage of the property that is for business use, you would be allowed to deduct flood and homeowner insurance proportionately.

You must report rental income and expenses on business-use property on Schedule E of form 1040. — Eugene J. Varsalona is a certified public accountant in Little Ferry.

Q. When does it make sense for New Jersey taxpayers to do the work to amend a prior return? For example, we realized after filing for 2010 that total out-of-pocket medical expenses can possibly be deducted if they exceed more than 2 percent of adjusted gross income in New Jersey.

Individual income tax returns are amended on Form 1040X if you are amending a federal return and N.J. 1040X if you are amending a New Jersey return. According to the Internal Revenue Service, you can amend a return to correct the original return filed, make elections after the prescribed deadline, change amounts adjusted by the Internal Revenue Service or claim a carryback due to an unused credit.

Amended returns for both federal and state purposes must be filed within three years (including extensions) after the date the original return was filed or within two years after the date the taxes were paid, whichever is later.

Interest and penalties will be assessed against any balance due on the amended returns, so it is best to amend the returns as soon as an error is found.

I would recommend amending the N.J. 1040 if you determine that the out-of-pocket medical expenses exceed 2 percent of your New Jersey adjusted gross income. If you are entitled to a refund, you should claim it. — Thomas J. Braun is a certified public accountant in Park Ridge.

Tax questions? The Record's committee of local experts may be able to help. Accountants from theBergen County Chapter of the New Jersey Society of Certified Public Accountants, who are volunteering their time, will answer questions in The Record's Business section weekly until April. Email lynn@northjersey.com with "Tax Mailbag" in the subject line.

Tags: long island, property damage, insurance, new york, flood insurance, insurance claim

Flood and homeowner's insurance are not deductible

Posted on Fri, Feb 24, 2012 @ 09:35 AM
 
 
 
insurance,insurance claim, flood insurance,property damage,long island,new york

Q. I understand there is a tax deduction for mortgage insurance, provided that your income is less than $100,000 per year. Are flood insurance and home insurance also deductible if your income is under $100,000?

Mortgage insurance premiums paid on your personal residence or second home would be deductible as an interest deduction on Schedule A (itemized deductions) on Form 1040. The deduction phases out once your adjusted gross income (AGI) exceeds $100,000 for single and joint filers and $50,000 for married filing separately.

Flood and homeowners insurance are not deductible unless a portion of your home is used for business (for example, a two-family house). Based on the percentage of the property that is for business use, you would be allowed to deduct flood and homeowner insurance proportionately.

You must report rental income and expenses on business-use property on Schedule E of form 1040. — Eugene J. Varsalona is a certified public accountant in Little Ferry.

Q. When does it make sense for New Jersey taxpayers to do the work to amend a prior return? For example, we realized after filing for 2010 that total out-of-pocket medical expenses can possibly be deducted if they exceed more than 2 percent of adjusted gross income in New Jersey.

Individual income tax returns are amended on Form 1040X if you are amending a federal return and N.J. 1040X if you are amending a New Jersey return. According to the Internal Revenue Service, you can amend a return to correct the original return filed, make elections after the prescribed deadline, change amounts adjusted by the Internal Revenue Service or claim a carryback due to an unused credit.

Amended returns for both federal and state purposes must be filed within three years (including extensions) after the date the original return was filed or within two years after the date the taxes were paid, whichever is later.

Interest and penalties will be assessed against any balance due on the amended returns, so it is best to amend the returns as soon as an error is found.

I would recommend amending the N.J. 1040 if you determine that the out-of-pocket medical expenses exceed 2 percent of your New Jersey adjusted gross income. If you are entitled to a refund, you should claim it. — Thomas J. Braun is a certified public accountant in Park Ridge.

Tax questions? The Record's committee of local experts may be able to help. Accountants from theBergen County Chapter of the New Jersey Society of Certified Public Accountants, who are volunteering their time, will answer questions in The Record's Business section weekly until April. Email lynn@northjersey.com with "Tax Mailbag" in the subject line.

Tags: long island, property damage, insurance, new york, flood insurance, insurance claim

What is an Insurance Claim? by WiseGEEK.com

Posted on Thu, Feb 23, 2012 @ 01:32 PM

insurance, insurance claim, insurance claims,property damage,disaster,restoration,long island,new york,insurance agent,property damage claim

An insurance claim is the actual application for benefits provided by an insurance company. Policy holders must first file an insurance claim before any money can be disbursed to the hospital or repair shop or other contracted service. The insurance company may or may not approve the claim, based on their own assessment of the circumstances.

Individuals who take out home, life, health, or automobile insurance policies must maintain regular payments called premiums to the insurers. Most of the time these premiums are used to settle another person's insurance claim or to build up the available assets of the insurance company. But occasionally an accident will happen which causes real financial damage, such as a automobile wreck or a tornado or a work-related accident. At this point the injured policy holder has the right to file an insurance claim in order to receive money from the insurance company.

In general, the insurance claim is filed with a local representative of the insurance company. This agent becomes responsible for investigating the specific details of the insurance claim and negotiating the payment from the main insurers. Many times a recognized authority (doctor, repair shop, building contractor) can file the necessary insurance claim forms directly with the insurance company. However, sometimes the policy holder may not want to file an actual insurance claim if the damage is minor or another party has agreed to pay out-of-pocket for their mistake.

After an insurance claim is filed, the insurance company may send out an investigator called an adjustor or appraiser. The insurance adjustor's job is to objectively evaluate the insurance claim and determine if the repair estimates are reasonable. This is to prevent possible fraud by contractors who may inflate their bills for additional compensation. Insurance companies tend to accept the adjustor or appraiser's evaluation as the final word on the insurance claim.

Some insurance claims may not be recognized by the insurance company for any number of reasons. If a claimant's premiums have not been paid in full, the policy itself may not be active. Another insurance company may have already agreed to pay for the damages listed in the claim. This happens quite often in automobile accidents where one party is held responsible. Another reason an insurance claim may be rejected is a failure to fall under covered conditions. Most insurance policies spell out specific areas which qualify for benefits. If the accident or damage claim was caused by carelessness or an unavoidable "Act of God", the insurance company has the right to withhold payments.

An insurance claim is the only way to officially apply for benefits under an insurance policy, but until the insurance company has assessed the situation it will remain only a claim, not a pay-out.

Tags: disaster, long island, property damage, insurance claims, insurance, new york, insurance agent, insurance claim, restoration, property damage claim

Enservio Continues Growth, Acquires Insurers World

Posted on Fri, Feb 17, 2012 @ 10:54 AM

NEEDHAM, Mass.--(EON: Enhanced Online News)--Enservio (www.enservio.com), the nation’s leading provider of property insurance analytics, affinity marketing and claims solutions, today announced that the company has entered into a definitive agreement to acquire Insurers World (www.insurersworld.com) of Canton, Mass.

“Insurers World is an excellent company with strong management, great products, and similar values, and we have watched and admired them for years”

Together, Enservio and Insurers World will be able to offer property insurers a full range of solutions from strategic analytics to claims software and services nationally. As a combined entity, Enservio provides solutions to 12 of the largest property insurers in the nation, has over 300 insurer customers and over 450 employees nationally.

“Insurers World is an excellent company with strong management, great products, and similar values, and we have watched and admired them for years,” said Jon McNeill, CEO of Enservio. “This is a great day for both companies. We are thrilled to welcome Insurers World into the Enservio family. Over the years, we’ve developed a great deal of respect for the Insurers World professional team and their capabilities. This acquisition doubles the value we bring to our customers and doubles our geographic footprint in our claims services business.”

Don Stafford of Insurers World echoed the same, “We are thrilled to be joining Enservio and to benefit from their continued drive to create real innovation and efficiencies in the industry, including their enterprise Software as a Service (SaaS) platform. Together, we’ll not only provide our customers with the same unparalleled service levels, but also offer them a broader range of industry-changing solutions like the ReStoreMall and ReStoreCard.”

With this acquisition, Insurers World will retain its distinct brand identity, while strengthening and complementing Enservio. Insurers World will continue to be based in Canton, Massachusetts.

About Enservio

Enservio is the market leader in property insurance affinity solutions, strategic analytics, and contents software, inventory, valuation, replacement and replacement tools. Enservio created the first SaaS (software as a service) software platform for contents, the first replacement mall, the first payment debit card for claims and the first ContentsITV product. We provide software and services to property insurance carriers and their policy holders nationwide. Founded in 2004, we are headquartered near Boston, in Needham, MA with offices and professional staff across the United States. For additional information, please visit the company's web sitewww.enservio.com or call 888.567.7557.

About Insurers World

Since 1978, Insurers World™ has been a chosen partner of insurance companies to establish accurate LKQ and indemnity, incomparable to other industry services. Without the partnership of IW, an adjuster’s contents inventories may remain dormant while they manage more pressing tasks in their workload, returning to their contents evaluation now and again. This issue is simply resolved with the use IW’s inventory transcription and evaluation services, which proceed immediately upon claim submission, allowing the adjuster to concentrate on higher level tasks, making optimal use of their time.

Article First Appeared On EON Business Wire

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Contacts

Topaz Partners
Tom Francoeur, 781-404-2405
tfrancoeur@topazpartners.com

Tags: long island, insurance claims, insurance, new york, insurance claim, insurance industry, enservio, claim

Insurance Claims: What To Do After A Disaster Due to A Storm

Posted on Tue, Feb 14, 2012 @ 03:47 PM

insurance claim, insurance claims,insurance,property damage,storm damage,disaster,disasters,restoration,long island,new york

After the storm, besides making temporary repairs, there are several steps you should take that will aid in the filing of an insurance claim.
 
Make temporary repairs

  • Make temporary repairs to prevent further weather related damage. Cover holes in the roof, walls, doors and windows with plastic or boards. Be careful not to risk your own safety in making the repairs.
  • Save receipts for any material you buy. Your insurance company will reimburse you for the cost.
  • Beware of building contractors that encourage you to spend a lot of money on temporary repairs. Remember that payments for temporary repairs are part of the total settlement. If you pay a contractor a large sum for a temporary repair job, you may not have enough money for permanent repairs.
  • Don't make extensive permanent repairs until after the claims adjuster has been to your home and assessed the damage.
  • Avoid using electrical appliances, including stereos and television sets, that have been exposed to water unless they've been checked by a technician.
 
Call your insurance agent or insurance company
  • Report the damage to your insurance agent or insurance company representative. Ask questions such as: Am I covered? Does my claim exceed my deductible? (Your deductible is the amount of loss you agree to pay yourself when you buy a policy.) How long will it take to process my claim? Will I need to obtain estimates for repairs to structural damage?
 
Save receipts for additional living expenses. 
  • Most homeowners policies cover additional living expenses such as food and housing costs, telephone or utility installation costs in a temporary residence, extra transportation costs to and from work or school, relocation and storage expenses and furniture rental for a temporary residence. Your insurance company will usually advance you money for these expenses. The payments will be part of the final claim settlement. Let your insurance company know where you can be reached so that the claims adjuster can give you a check.
  • The maximum amount available to pay for such expenses is generally equal to 20 percent of the insurance on your home. So on a home insured for $100,000, up to $20,000 would be available. This amount is in addition to the $100,000 to pay for repairs or to rebuild your home. Some insurance companies pay more than 20 percent. Others limit additional living expenses to the amount actually spent during a certain period of time, such as 12 months, instead of a maximum percentage of the policy limit.
 

Preparing for the adjuster's visit

The claims process may begin in one of two ways.
  1. Your insurance company may send you a claim form, known as a "proof of loss form," to complete.
  2. An adjuster may visit your home before you're asked to fill out any forms. (An adjuster is a person professionally trained to assess the damage.) Usually, the more information you have about your damaged home and belongings the faster your claim can be settled.
  • Major disasters make enormous demands on insurance company personnel. Your adjuster generally will come prepared to do a thorough and complete study of the damage to your home. However, the large number of claims may place time restrictions on adjusters forcing them to "scope the loss." If your adjuster doesn't make a complete evaluation of the loss on the first visit, try to set up an appointment for a second visit.
  • Be sure to keep copies of lists and other documents you submit to your insurance company. Also, keep copies of whatever paperwork your insurance company gives you.
Personal Belongings:
  1. Make lists of the damaged items. Include the brand names and model numbers of appliances and electronic equipment. If possible, take photographs of the damage. Don't forget to list items such as clothing, sports equipment, tools, china, linens, outside furniture, holiday decorations and hobby materials.
  2. Use your home inventory or put together a set of records - old receipts, bills and photographs - to help establish the price and age of everything that needs to be replaced or repaired.
  3. If your property was destroyed or you no longer have any records, you will have to work from memory. Try to picture the contents of every room and then write a description of what was there. Try also to remember where and when you bought each piece and about how much you paid.
  4. Don't throw out damaged furniture and other expensive items because the adjuster will want to see them.
Structure of Your Home:
  1. Identify the structural damage to your home and other buildings on your premises, like a garage, toolshed or in-ground swimming pool.
  2. Make a list of everything you would like to show the adjuster when he or she arrives. This should include cracks in the walls, damage to the floor or ceiling and missing roof tiles. If structural damage is likely even though you can't see any signs of it, discuss this with your adjuster. In some cases, the adjuster may recommend hiring a licensed engineer or architect to inspect the property.
  3. Have the electrical system checked. Most insurance companies pay for such inspections.
  4. Get written bids from reliable, licensed contractors on the repair work. The bids should include details of the materials to be used and prices on a line-by-line basis.

This article was taken from Local10.com

 

Tags: reoprting a claim, what to do after a storm, property damage, insurance claims, insurance, restoration, disasters

Florida House OKs Alternative Hurricane Insurance

Posted on Mon, Feb 06, 2012 @ 09:17 AM

 

By BILL KACZOR | February 6, 2012

Claims Journal

hurricane,insurance,hurricane insurance,long island,new york,long island hurricane,Legislation designed to help state-backed Citizens Property Insurance Co. spin off customers to reduce its hurricane risk cleared the Florida House after a heated debate Friday.

The bill (HB 245) would let surplus lines companies, which have unregulated rates, take customers from Citizens if the firms meet certain financial requirements.

Gov. Rick Scott has taken the lead in pushing for the depopulation of Citizens. He contends its rates, limited by law, are artificially low, which could leave nearly all Floridians on the hook if a major storm hits the state.

That’s because Citizens can assess not only its own customers but those of other insurers providing a variety of coverage, including automobile policies, to make up its losses. Created to be an insurer of last resort, Citizens has become Florida’s largest property insurer with nearly 1.5 million customers as private companies have fled the state or downsized because of the hurricane threat.

The bill that passed 66-48 now goes to the Senate where similar legislation hasn’t yet had a committee hearing.

It would let Citizens automatically hand off homeowners and other customers to the surplus lines companies. Customers, however, could opt out of the switch or go back to Citizens later, the bill’s supporters said.

Opponents said customers who get switched would face higher rates and could be left holding the bag if their insurer becomes insolvent and cannot cover claims. That’s because surplus lines are not included in the Florida Insurance Guaranty Association.

“Insolvencies happen. They happen all the time,” said Rep. Rick Kriseman, a St. Petersburg Democrat who opposed the bill.

Kriseman said the guaranty association has paid out $24.2 billion for claims against more than 600 insolvent insurers.

Supporters said surplus lines companies would be required to have at least $50 million in surplus funds to participate in the program and that many are owned by major insurance companies with even greater financial backing.

“They are mainstream participants in the U.S. insurance marketplace,” said Rep. Bill Hager, a Boca Raton Republican and former Iowa insurance commissioner. “They are recognized in the main as stable, good-faith operators.”

Floridians could depend on them in case the state is struck by a major hurricane such as Katrina, which devastated New Orleans, Hager said.

“Katrina’s coming,” he told his colleagues. “You’ll look good when you vote for this. Your constituents will look even better.”

Although the state Office of Insurance Regulation, or OIR, cannot regulate surplus line rates, it does oversee the companies in other ways and can kick them out of the state if they get into financial trouble, Hager said.

That argument did not sway Rep. Evan Jenne, D-Dania Beach.

“OIR stands for the ‘office of industry rubber-stamping,”’ Jenne said.

Kriseman also criticized the legislation for having an opt-out rather than an opt-in provision.

“That means we’re asking our seniors, our seasonal residents and our families, who are busy working, to hopefully receive, read and understand the notification letter and then to take the step to reject the switch if they don’t want it,” he said.

Tags: disaster, insurance, hurricane, disaster preparedness, hurricane insurance

Thermal Imaging: How Invisible Light Keeps You Safe

Posted on Thu, Feb 02, 2012 @ 11:00 AM

Article First Appeared on Forbes.com

Article Written by Marc Weber Tobias, Forbes Contributor

 

Marc Weber Tobias Marc is an investigative attorney and physical security specialist.

  Follow Marc On Forbes.com

I just attended the Intersec security conference in Dubai. It was the largest display of security technology in the Middle East and featured participants and vendors from Europe, the United States and Asia. It appeared from the hundreds of vendors present that the world has gone totally video for surveillance, facial recognition, motion sensing, integrated alarm systems, remote monitoring, low light level image capture, and many other applications. I would estimate that at least fifty percent of the displays were related to video technology. There were also some lock and safe manufacturers, armored vehicles produced in Dubai, and other assorted systems for government, private security, law enforcement and hospitality.

My thermal photograph was taken with a handheld camera. Note the presence of identifiable characteristics.

I attend a number of these gatherings every year so I am usually not very impressed with all the new gadgets, fancy packaging, and new modifications of existing products. The fact is that there is not a lot new but rather a recombination of technology that has already been developed. Having said that, one specific high-tech solution got my attention and I thought it was cool enough to write about. It is called FLIR, which is the acronym for Forward Looking Infrared. The initial technology was developed by Texas Instruments in 1956 when they began research on IR. In 1963 the first forward-looking infrared camera was developed, and went into production in 1966. A few years later, the FLIR Corporation in Portland, Oregon began doing business and has really pioneered useable applications for many different applications. This company is clearly the world leaders in this incredibly sophisticated and diverse imaging system for both government and the private sector.

See my interview with Barshar Al Zubaidi, who is assigned to the Dubai office.

I was first introduced to FLIR when I was involved in a serial murder investigation about ten years ago in South Dakota. We were looking for a fresh gravesite and obtained the assistance of the FBI who flew their FLIR-equipped aircraft to aid in the search. Infrared sensing technology looks at heat rather than light, so it can see different “signatures” that are left as the result of different temperature characteristics of objects, bodies, and items that have been touched by anything that has a different temperature than its surroundings. We used FLIR to look for temperature variations in the ground that would be likely to result from a freshly dug hole.

Unlike a traditional video image sensor that relies upon visible light and a glass lens that focuses specific frequencies onto a target sensor, the FLIR camera uses a germanium green-colored metal lens to focus heat in the form of infrared radiation onto a digital sensor. If you look at a FLIR lens it is solid and has no optical characteristics.  The heat from the target is translated into a visual image, as shown in the thermal photograph of my head.  This type of technology is different than low light level sensors used in night vision equipment which simply amplify visible light and near infrared ranges (0.4-1.0  μm). The wavelength of infrared that thermal imaging cameras detect is very different than visible light.

These lenses and associated hardware are extremely expensive, with a starting price tag of about $25,000, in part because of the limited availability of germanium from Africa.

There are many very neat applications for heat-sensing devices. These include fire fighting, medicine, security, border protection, environmental, equipment preventative maintenance, surveillance of living things, military uses on tanks, ships, and aircraft, open space surveillance and handheld applications. They are also quite useful in finding gas leaks on pipelines, and energy loss, as well as watershed temperature monitoring, and monitoring of wild game habitats. Handheld FLIR cameras are even used by hunters and game control officers to see animals at night, and for search and rescue operations to locate missing persons, especially in wooded areas and water. They are also valuable for monitoring active volcanoes, and for searching for drug labs at night.

These systems are also being used to identify hot spots in oil refineries, power plants, pipelines and a wide array of other applications where there is concern about heat buildup and potential damage or fire hazard. When I was traveling in Asia during the SARS epidemic, all major airports were scanning arriving passengers for temperatures in excess of the norm, which would indicate illness.

Our military uses FLIR technology in warfare because it offers three primary advantages. It is virtually impossible for the enemy to detect because no signal is sent out that can be intercepted, heat is very difficult to camouflage, and the systems are not prone to failures that are common in visible-light systems.

The systems can work in total darkness and are not affected by fog, haze smoke or other environmental factors which makes the technology ideal for security and surveillance operations. Unlike traditional video cameras there are no dead zones in which criminals or terrorists or other attackers can exploit the system and hide. Used in concert with ground sensors, radar, video cameras and thermal imaging, it is almost impossible to defeat or spoof one of these systems.

I learned from my colleagues with the Dubai Police that most of the royal families in the Middle East employ FLIR in conjunction with other sophisticated security measures to protect their palaces and homes. Because the systems are passive there is no reliable way to detect their presence or operation. They can see vehicles up to 21 Kilometers and a human about 18 Kilometer from a camera.

One of the most-clever uses of FLIR is embedding a tiny camera in the front grill of certain models of BMWs (5-6-7) to warn the driver of animals and pedestrians up to 500 meters in front of the vehicle. These systems are smart enough to alert the driver of hazards well in advance of what your headlights will show. Another innovative application is the use by Veterinarians to examine racehorses for inflammation and other problems that could aversely affect performance or injure the horse. This is especially popular in the GCC countries, where extremely expensive thoroughbred racehorses are one of the past times of the incredibly wealthy.

The latest iteration of these systems is seventh-generation technology and will allow the integration of enhanced video processing and readout of the temperature of a target, producing a 640 x 480 display of information. With digital detail enhancement and high-resolution sensors, a target can actually be identified which was not possible in earlier generations. Their proper deployment can replace fixed perimeter fences in certain applications with “virtual fences’ that will instantly alarm when an established area is penetrated. Imagine a virtual fence with a range from 200 meters to 21 Kilometers.

While these systems are extremely useful in law enforcement operations, there are serious privacy concerns because of the potential intrusive nature of the technology in surveillance operations.  In 2001, the U.S. Supreme Court decided a case that involved warrantless surveillance of private property to detect a marijuana farming operation. A thermal imaging camera was used without a search warrant and was ruled unconstitutional in Kyllo v. United States, 533 U.S. 27. In contrast, the Canadian Supreme Court has determined that the use of thermal imaging by police did not require a warrant.

While I saw a lot of innovative technology at Intersec and other conferences I have recently attended, I don’t think that any traditional video system can match the capabilities of Infrared sensing. Its price tag is steep but if you have the responsibility to protect a facility or potential target with an almost foolproof surveillance system, this is clearly one alternative.

This is a very cool technology, even if it relies solely on heat to do its work!

Tags: thermal imaging, infrared technology, infrared, technology, invisible light

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