Property Damage & Disaster Restoration Blog: Long Island & New York City

Water Damage, Floods & Heavy Rains Pummel NY!

Posted on Thu, Jun 18, 2009 @ 03:50 PM

The National Weather Service has issued a FLASH FLOOD WATCH for portions of New York and New Jersey from until 8 p.m. on Thursday.

A FLASH FLOOD WATCH means that conditions may develop that lead to flash flooding. Flash flooding is a very dangerous situation. One to two inches of rainfall is expected. Locally higher amounts are possible especially in areas affected by thunderstorms.

TRACK WATCHES AND WARNINGS
There is also an urban flood advisory for Nassau and Suffolk counties until 4:45 p.m.
Recent heavy rainfall has left soil conditions around the New York City metropolitan area and northern New Jersey saturated.

Forecasters are predicting one to two inches into early Thursday evening, with higher amounts from thunderstorms. Streams could rise, particularly along the Raritan and Passaic river basins. Check your basements for water damage...

Water Source Categories

Category 1: Often referred to as “clean” waterA “clean” water source is one that does not pose substantial harm to humans. Examples of clean water sources may include, but are not limited to: broken water supply lines, tub or sink overflows with no contaminants, appliance malfunctions involving water supply lines, melting ice or falling rainwater – not that which flows over the soil or through multiple structural components- broken toilet tanks, and even toilet bowls that do not contain contaminants or additives. Once a clean water source contacts other surfaces and materials, its condition may change as it dissolves or mixes with soils and other contaminants, and as time elapses.

Category 2: Often referred to as “gray” water Unsanitary or “gray” water contains some degree of contamination. Potentially, it could cause substantial discomfort or sickness if consumed by humans, and it carries microorganisms or nutrients for microorganisms. Category 2 (gray) water examples may include, but are not limited to: discharge from dishwashers or washing machines, overflows from washing machines, overflows of toilet bowls with some urine (no feces), broken aquariums, and punctured water beds. All of these may contain chemicals or biocontaminants (fungal, bacterial, viral, algae), or other forms of contamination. Time and temperature aggravate Category 2 (gray) water contamination significantly. Water in flooded structures that remains untreated longer than 48 hours can change from Category 2 (gray) to Category 3 (black).

Category 3: Often referred to as “black” waterCategory 3 “black” water always contains pathogenic agents. Grossly unsanitary, “black” water sources are those that arise from sewage or other contaminated water entering a structure. Sewage contains the expected urine and feces; but it could also contain dangerous chemicals or medical wastes. Toilet backflows that originate from beyond the toilet trap are considered to be Category 3 (black) water situations, regardless of visible content or color. This category includes all forms of sea water, ground surface water, and rising water from, rivers or streams. They carry silt and organic matter into structures and create Category 3 ”black” water situations. In situations where structural materials and / or contents have been heavily contaminated with such materials as pesticides, heavy metals, or toxic organic substances; the water damage is considered to be Category 3 (black) water.

If you have flooding or water damage from the storms hitting the NY Metro area, contact a reputable property damage restoration company. Advanced Restoration Corporation is a preferred vendor for insurance companies and is available 24/7 to respond to any disaster situation. Call them today at (800) 693-6263, or visit them on the web at www.AdvancedRestoration.com.

Tags: disaster, restoration companies, water damage, groundwater, advanced restoration corporation, long island water damage, water extraction, emergency service, flood damage, flood, moisture, water leaks

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