Property Damage & Disaster Restoration Blog: Long Island & New York City

Got Mold? What Every New York Homeowner Needs to Know

Posted on Thu, Jun 02, 2011 @ 05:19 PM
mold,mold removal,mold abatement,mold remediation,long island,new york,indoor air quality,mold contaminationLong Island and the rest of New York and the Northeast was devastated from the recent flooding caused by torrential rain, wind, and storm damage. A majority of flooded basements across Long Island were caused by ground water due to over-saturation of the earth.  Insurance companies do not cover ground water under their policies. 

You have to have a separate Flood Insurance if you fall into the Flood Coverage Area.  And that only covers ground water damage to structures that are above grade.  Basements are not above grade so they would be excluded from those policies if they were flooded. 

That means there were many Long Island homeowners that had flooded basements that were not covered by their insurance policy.   

For some people this is too much.  There are a lot of people in hardship right now across Long Island due to the economic times we live in.  If they did not hire a professional restoration company or water damage cleanup company like Advanced Restoration Corporation, they had to extract / remove the water themselves or rely on friends and/or family to help them out.

Just because the water is removed, does not mean your job is over.  The wet porous building materials need to be removed, or dried along with the structural wood members so their moisture content levels are reduced to regional acceptable standards.  
And some people will just ignore the water in the basement or the leaky roof, thinking it will dry out on its own.  And technically, everything that gets wet will eventually dry, if it can.  And not every water intrusion causes severe mold contamination.  It all depends on the size of the area and the lenght of time the area has been wet without any attention.  

At this  point you should ask yourself this:
  • How long will it take?
  • Can the wet building materials dry out before mold contamination can occur (usually 48-72 hours in optimum conditions)?

If wet building materials are not addressed in a timely fashion then the problem magnifies exponentially over time until it becomes a much bigger and more expensive issue.

The issue of mold has always been an extremely hot topic in both the insurance and restoration industries. Over the past few years there has also been a great deal of media attention on the subject of mold remediation. Articles have appeared in major publications such as The Wall Street Journal as well as televised on popular shows such as 48 Hours, Primetime and even Oprah. In some cases, a homeowner is shown speaking to a reporter explaining how the mold has completely ruined their home and belongings to the point that the home had to be burned down by the local fire department because there was no other way of solving the contamination issues.

This type of media attention may help with ratings and sales of newspapers and magazines but it is certainly not realistic. It is important to understand that mold is ubiquitous and the goal of remediation is to bring the indoor air quality to an acceptable level.  Should moisture be introduced into the indoor environment, mold growth will likely occur.  In nearly every case of fungal contamination, a home and many of its contents can be cleaned of mold growth. What is never mentioned is how this can be achieved. We can recommend and apply several proven techniques such as "HEPA sandwich" cleaning or baking soda blasting. Because the media is not educated in the field nor do they fully understand, the public is often misled and does not understand the very real dangers of fungal contamination.

Another way to look at the current mold situation is to compare it to the asbestos issues we encountered in the 1970's and 1980's. The media was undoubtedly responsible for magnifying the fears of the public. As the demand for abatement quickly increased many companies rushed to capitalize on the situation without being experienced or formally educated. This in turn leads to bad advice and overreaction. If mold remediation contractors are able to accurately educate and communicate with homeowners and insurance companies these issues could be resolved without unnecessary expense and anguish.

Mold contamination and mold remediation may not be as bad as the sensationalized media makes it out to be. Although there is definitely some health risks associated with mold exposure, in particular Stachybotrys or black mold, it is important that it is dealt with appropriately. Regardless of the level of contamination to your residential, commercial, or industrial building on Long Island and New York City, you can rest assured that we posses the technology, education and ability to successfully complete your project in the most efficient and cost-effective way. Please do not hesitate in calling us for information or guidance on any of your mold related projects. We are here to help in any way possible. We are members of the Indoor Air Quality Association and hold our certifications through the IICRC and RIA.

Please do not hesitate to Contact Us for any assistance or guidance if you have or even think you have a mold issue in the Long Island and New York City areas.  We would be more than happy to speak with you.


Tags: mold abatement, long island, mold, new york, mold remediation, new york city, mold removal, indoor air quality, flooded basements, wet building material, mold contamination

FEMA, NOAA MARK THE BEGINNING OF NATIONAL HURRICANE PREPAREDNESS WEEK

Posted on Mon, May 23, 2011 @ 11:48 AM

 

describe the image

WASHINGTON -- The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) are partnering once again to get the message out about the importance of preparedness for hurricanes and other possible disasters. FEMA is aggressively preparing for the upcoming hurricane season and has been working closely with other federal, state, local, and tribal partners, the private sector, faith-based and voluntary organizations, and most importantly, the public, to get ready.

President Obama recently designated May 22-28, 2011, as National Hurricane Preparedness Week, and called upon all Americans, especially those in hurricane prone areas as well as inland areas, to learn more about how to protect themselves against hurricanes and to work together, as a whole community, to respond to and recover from them. The Atlantic and Central Pacific Hurricane Season runs from June 1-November 30. The Eastern Pacific Hurricane Season began on May 15.

FEMA continues to work with state, local, tribal, federal and private sector partners to increase preparedness and coordinate response and recovery in the case of a hurricane or other disaster. FEMA also urges Americans to use this week as an annual reminder to assess their personal readiness to respond to emergencies. Our team can only be as prepared as the public is prepared, which is why it's important that people living in hurricane-prone areas take steps to prepare and protect their family. 

"We never know where the next hurricane or disaster will strike, but what we do know is that being prepared can make a world of difference, for individuals and their larger communities," said FEMA Administrator Craig Fugate. "In hurricane prone areas as well as inland areas, we urge the entire community to prepare now. There are a number of steps individuals, families, communities, churches and businesses can take to better protect themselves against hurricanes and other disasters."

"Having a personal hurricane plan is not just for those living along the coast. Inland areas are just as vulnerable to the effects from hurricanes, including damaging winds, tornadoes, and especially, flooding," said Bill Read, director, NOAA's National Hurricane Center.

Throughout the entire hurricane season it is important to know the risk for the area in which you are in and to stay informed of the latest weather information. Having a battery-powered radio, like a NOAA Weather Radio is a critical first step.  Also, everyone, including those living well inland, should be prepared by checking personal preparations such as emergency kit supplies and knowing emergency evacuation routes. More information on how we can all be prepared for this hurricane season can be found by visiting www.Ready.gov/hurricanes

 

Businesses have a vital role in preparedness as well.  Putting a disaster plan in motion now will improve the likelihood that your company may recover from a disaster faster. Ready Business outlines commonsense measures business owners and managers can take to start getting ready.

For more information on how we can all be prepared for this hurricane season, visit www.Ready.gov/hurricanes

For information about the hurricane outlooks and National Hurricane Preparedness Week, visit http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/outreach/prepared_week.shtml

Click here to view the Presidential Proclamation on National Hurricane Preparedness Week.

 

FEMA's mission is to support our citizens and first responders to ensure that as a nation we work together to build, sustain, and improve our capability to prepare for, protect against, respond to, recover from, and mitigate all hazards.

Tags: national hurricane preparedness week, hurricane damage long island, 2011 hurricane season, FEMA, hurricane, noaa, storms

2011 Atlantic Hurricane Season

Posted on Fri, Apr 01, 2011 @ 09:58 AM

2011 atlantic hurricane season

AccuWeather.com Hurricane Center meteorologists, led by Meteorologist and Hurricane Forecaster Paul Pastelok, are predicting an active season for 2011 with more impact on the U.S. coastline than last year.

The team is forecasting a total of 15 named tropical storms, eight of which will attain hurricane status and three of which will attain major hurricane status (Category 3 or higher).

In a normal year, there are 10 tropical storms, six of which become hurricanes and two of which become major hurricanes, or attain winds that exceed 110 mph.

2010's historic season had a total of 19 named storms and ranks as the third most active season on record, but there was little impact on the United States coastline. Twelve of these storms became hurricanes, five of which were major hurricanes. Two names from the 2010 season were retired on March 16.

"It looks like we're going to have more impact on the mainland of the U.S. coming up this year compared to last year," Pastelok said. "We had a lot of storms last year, but not a lot of impact [on the U.S.]."

In order to project the number of storms and impacts, the team looks at past years that have similar weather variables and patterns that closely resemble the most recent fall, winter and early spring months.

This Season's Concern Areas

As with most Atlantic hurricane seasons, the areas where storms are most likely to make landfall shift as the season progresses.

This year, the early season threat area will be the western Gulf of Mexico and the southern portion of the Caribbean. Within this zone, the higher concern for landfalls will be along the Texas and Louisiana coastlines.

As for the mid-to-late season zones, the eastern Gulf and Caribbean will be the focus. The higher concern areas will be the Florida Peninsula to the Carolinas.

"What we see is there is a clustering of storm impacts over the southeastern US, and that's the reason why we earmarked this as a concern area," said Kottlowski.

Another mid-to-late season concern for landfalls will be northern New England and the Canadian Maritimes.

"We feel that this season, there will be a higher potential for impacts across the southern part of the Basin into the Gulf of Mexico during the first part of the season," Pastelok stated. "This higher potential for impacts shift farther north into the southeast U.S. during the latter half of the season."

Hurricane season officially begins June 1 and ends Nov. 30.

For all the latest tropical information, be sure to check the AccuWeather.com Hurricane Center for the most up-to-date videos, information and storm tracks.

Article Source: Accuweather.com
By Gina Cherundolo, AccuWeather.com

Tags: disaster, floods, flooding, long island hurricane season, hurricane damage long island, property damage long island, 2011 hurricane season, long island water damage, disaster restoration, long island huricane, catastrophe, water removal long island, hurricane, long island after the storms, accuweather forecast

President Declares Major Disaster For New York

Posted on Mon, Feb 21, 2011 @ 10:57 AM

snow storm, fema disaster declaration,

WASHINGTON -- The U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) today announced that federal disaster aid has been made available to New York to supplement state and local recovery efforts in the area struck by a severe winter storm and snowstorm during the period of December 26-27, 2010.

Federal funding is available to state and eligible local governments and certain private nonprofit organizations on a cost-sharing basis for emergency work and the repair or replacement of facilities damaged by the severe winter storm and snowstorm in Nassau and Suffolk counties.

In addition, assistance is available to the state and eligible local governments in Nassau, Rensselaer, and Richmond counties on a cost-sharing basis for emergency protective measures, including snow assistance, for a continuous 48-hour period during or proximate to the incident period.

Federal funding is also available on a cost-sharing basis for hazard mitigation measures statewide.

John Long has been named as the Federal Coordinating Officer for Federal recovery operations in the affected area.  Long said additional designations may be made at a later date if requested by the state and warranted by the results of further damage assessments.

 

Assistance for State and Eligible Local Governments Can Include as Required:

  • Payment of not less than 75 percent of the eligible costs for repairing or replacing damaged public facilities, such as roads, bridges, utilities, buildings, schools, recreational areas and similar publicly owned property, as well as certain private non-profit organizations engaged in community service activities. (Source: FEMA funded, state administered.)
  • Payment of not less than 75 percent of the eligible costs for removing debris from public areas and for emergency measures taken to save lives and protect property and public health.  Emergency protective measures assistance is available to the state and eligible local governments on a cost-sharing basis for emergency protective measures, including snow assistance, for a continuous 48-hour period during or proximate to the incident period.  (Source: FEMA funded, state administered.). 
  • Payment of not more than 75 percent of the approved costs for hazard mitigation projects undertaken by state and local governments to prevent or reduce long-term risk to life and property from natural or technological disasters.  (Source: FEMA funded, state administered.)

For more information, visit FEMA.

Tags: disaster, cold winter, FEMA, snow storm, new york, catastrophe, long island after the storms, nor'easter

New York Homeowners Beware: After Snow, the Ice Dam Cometh

Posted on Fri, Feb 04, 2011 @ 01:52 PM

Written by 

Gwendolyn Bounds

for The Wall Street Journal

new york,long island,ice dam,water damage,freezing,water,leak damage,leak,roof,collapseThe latest winter storm, coupled with heavy snow accumulation and long cold snaps across the U.S., have left homeowners, pedestrians and buildings themselves unusually vulnerable to the dangers of ice and snow buildup.

Well beyond slipping, there's a growing risk of injury from falling material. Recently, a chunk of ice plunged from a pine tree and landed on Mark D'Ambrosio as he cleared the driveway of his of Abington, Mass., home. His son called 911, and Mr. D'Ambrosio was hospitalized briefly with a head wound that required three staples.

"I've been in this house 13 years and never seen anything like what's happening this winter," says the 39-year-old Mr. D'Ambrosio.

Other times, the danger comes from homeowners trying to clear roofs of winter's mess before it causes structural damage.

While roof collapses get the most attention, a more common worry for the average homeowner is ice dams. These often form when an under-insulated home's heat escapes through the attic, warms the roof and melts snow. As water runs down the roof it can refreeze into an icy dam along the overhang, which is cooler—much like a bridge.

If the dam gets big enough, it can then block water from running off the roof and force it to back up under shingles, triggering leaks and other damage. Icicles are one symptom of dams forming.

As snow and ice storms pummel the Northeast, Midwest and South this week, consumers are trying to remove snow however they can. Sales of roof rakes—long-handled tools used from the safety of ground level—are up 30% at Garelick Manufacturing Co., which went back into production this month to meet demand. Northern Tool + Equipment Co. cites unusually strong demand for its hockey puck-sized RoofMelt tablets made of calcium chloride, which can be tossed atop roofs to fuel melting.

Businesses specializing in ice-cutting with pressurized steam or hot water and other solutions report a surge of interest. Bylin Heating Systems Inc. has logged a 200% rise in inquiries this winter for its electrical ice-melting roof systems, which are best installed after existing dams are cleared. Similar demand is brewing for installers of attic insulation and other products that prevent heat loss and slow ice dam formation.

Tom Mahoney's 8,000 square foot house in Edina, Minn., was damaged after a thick ice dam formed along his roofline and triggered water leaks in his master bedroom. His solution: pay $1,000 to have chunks of the ice removed professionally.

Mr. Mahoney's contractor, Philip Grave of Dale Services Inc., says he and his brother are on track to earn $100,000 this winter as roof ice-cutters. The duo, who operate a carpet and window-cleaning business in warmer weather, charge $250 to $300 an hour to climb on roofs and slice away at ice dams with 180-200 degree water using a pressure washer-type system. Says Mr. Grave: "We cut ice every day in December and had a wait list."

But with so much snow, residents often are taking drastic short-term actions themselves. In Minnesota, where some areas have received more than 55 inches so far, a Shoreview man died Christmas Day after falling from his roof clearing snow. Meantime, Immanuel St. Joseph's hospital in Mankato has logged a surge of emergency room visits from people injured toppling off their rooftops while shoveling, says hospital spokesman Kevin Burns.

"It's directly attributable to the increased snow," says Mr. Burns who reports everything from scrapes and bruises to broken bones and serious internal injuries. "People are very well-intentioned but aren't prepared for the slippery conditions and steep pitch of the surface."

Last week in New York City, which had its snowiest January in history, the Department of Buildings issued a warning reminding property owners they are legally obligated to remove ice and snow from roofs, overhangs and awnings—and singled out icicles as "a threat to public safety."

A growing number of new homes are built with thicker insulation that can help prevent ice dams, including more than a million new homes that have earned the federal government's Energy Star label, and there are tax credits and subsidies available for retrofits.

"Most of the time, the ice is there and you are rolling the dice and may or may not have a big chunk hit someone's car or head, or a leak, but the risk is always there," says Mike Rogers, vice president of GreenHomes America Inc., a national home energy retrofit company.

When 51-year-old April Butler of Syracuse, N.Y., moved into her home in December, she wasn't aware that her house was at risk. But soon, dams and icicles hung like a cave around her front door, threatening to pull down her gutters and possibly harming a passer-by, including her 17-year-old daughter.

Ms. Butler hired GreenHomes America last week to blow insulation into her attic crawl space, seal air-leaks with foam and replace recessed ceiling light fixtures where the home's heat was escaping.

All these measures are designed to prevent ice dams from forming in the first place; much of what she has now is beginning to thaw.

The total cost: $7,062, for which she received a $2,500 subsidy based on her income as a teaching assistant from the Assisted Home Performance with Energy Star program.

"As of yet, we've had no leak damage," Ms. Butler says. "Hopefully this will eliminate the fear."

Write to Gwendolyn Bounds at [email protected]

Tags: homeowner, water damage, new york, water, ice dam, leak damage, roof

A Consumer Guide to Insurance for Natural Disasters

Posted on Thu, Dec 30, 2010 @ 10:59 AM

describe the image

Introduction
Natural disasters (including floods, nor'easters, etc.) affect the lives of many people in the United States every year.The hazardous effects can be local, impacting a neighborhood or community; or very large, affecting an entire city or county. People who understand disasters and know what to do before and after a disaster can significantly reduce the time and cost to return to normalcy. The purpose of this information is to provide an understanding of the types of natural disasters and the insurance available to cover the losses resulting from them.
 
Insurance for Your Residence
Depending on your type of dwelling, you will need to consider your insurance options to determine the most appropriate coverage. It makes good sense to purchase the type and amount of coverage that is adequate to protect your home and your family.

Owning a Home – There are various types of policies available to homeowners. In general, the homeowners policy combines property coverage with liability coverage. Dwelling policies only provide property coverage.

Rental – This policy covers the personal property owned by renters. It can also cover liabilities arising from accidents and injuries for guests..

Owning a Condominium – Condominium policies primarily provide content coverage to condominium owners. In addition, there are special provisions to cover the portions of the dwelling for which you are responsible as defined by the governing rules of the condominium.

Owning a Home on a Farm – If your home is on a farm, a farm owners policy may be appropriate to protect against loss. In general, a farm owners policy provides coverage for farm business exposures, and both property and liability coverages.
 
Insurance Available for Your Property
Before buying an insurance policy, you should check for the types of coverages and products available in New York State. You also need to know the types and limits of coverage you want to purchase. Coverage is available for:
 
Dwelling – This is the structure of the house. (That is considered a covered property.)

Other Structures – These are other structures that are separate from the house. Examples are detached garages or toolsheds.

Personal Property – The contents in your home are considered personal property. This includes furniture, appliances, clothing and computer equipment. Some personal properties are specifically excluded and are either not covered under the policy or have limited coverage. Examples are: money, jewelry and firearms.
 
Loss of Use – This is the cost of additional living expenses incurred, when the dwelling becomes uninhabitable, and the cause is due to a covered loss. Reimbursement, such as the cost of a hotel room, will be made to the insured to maintain a normal standard of living.
 
Information Source:
New York State Department of Insurance
25 Beaver Street One Commerce Plaza
New York, NY 10004 Albany, NY 12257
(212) 480-6400 (800) 342-3736
www.ins.state.ny.us

Tags: fire restoration, flood long island, insurance, insurance claim, disrepair, flood damage, disaster restoration, insurance industry, insurance industry long island

Air Quality Action Day is Forecast Today

Posted on Thu, Dec 30, 2010 @ 09:48 AM
An Air Quality Action Day is forecast in our
region for today (Thursday, December 30, 2010).

URGENT!

Here are several simple steps to take TODAY to prevent pollution:

  • Combine errands into a single trip.
  • Postpone unnecessary trips.
  • Take the subway, bus or train instead of driving.
  • Avoid letting your vehicle idle, such as at the drive-thru.
  • Postpone using gas-powered equipment.
  • Forward this message to family and friends.

The New York State Department of Transportation has declared that today (Thursday, December 30, 2010) is an Air Quality Action Day in the downstate metro area due to forecasted high levels of particulate matter (PM) pollution in parts of the region (please visit the Clean Air NY Web site for more information http://www.cleanairny.org/LocalAirQuality/Default.aspx). While today is still a day when people can go about most of their normal activities, such as going to work, driving may be one of the most polluting activities that people do today and we encourage everyone to leave their cars at home if possible.

Elevated PM levels are linked to heart attacks, asthma attacks, stroke and other respiratory and cardiovascular ailments. Children, people with pre-existing respiratory or heart conditions, people doing strenuous outdoor work or exercise and the elderly are particularly vulnerable to the effects of PM.

To learn more about improving air quality or if you were forwarded this message and want us to send updates to your own e-mail address, visit CleanAirNY.org or call 1-877-ILUVAIR (1-877-458-8247).

Clean Air NY is sponsored by the New York State Department of Transportation in support of regionwide air-quality efforts.

To ensure the delivery of these updates, please be sure to add [email protected] to your e-mail address book or safe list.

Source:

CleanAirNY.org

1-877-ILUVAIR (1-877-458-8247)
342 Broadway
Suite 404
New York, NY 10013
[email protected]

Tags: air quality, new york clean air, clean air, air quality alert, air quality action day

State Farm Insurance Sticking With PSP Program

Posted on Mon, Dec 20, 2010 @ 08:06 AM

state farm,insurance,psp,claims,insurance claim,coverage,premier service provider,disaster, restoration, disaster restoration, property damage, insurance claims, certified restorer, long island, new york, construction, insurance companies, brian martin, homes, buildings, commercial buildings, disasters, water damage, fire damage, smoke damage, indoor air quality, mold remediation, insurance company, iaq, cr, ria, restoration industry association, 24 hour emergency, disaster response, emergency disaster response, reconstruction, insurance repair, water damage repair, fire damage repair, building repairWith speculation running rampant that State Farm may be dropping its Premier Service Program, the insurance company reiterated to the Restoration Forum this week that the program isn’t going anywhere.

However, there is a possibility that the program could be seeing some changes as several sources have indicated that State Farm plans to outsource PSP to a third party manager.

“We are constantly looking at our programs for ways to make them better,” spokesperson Dick Luedke said. “That isn’t anything new, but at this time we have not made any decisions on changes for PSP”.

Additional rumors about the program dropping its exclusivity with SERVPRO and ServiceMaster have also surfaced and while those changes, as well as any other changes are always a possibility, nothing has been done at this time.

“We have not nailed any decisions down at this time,” claimed Luedke.

The Restoration Forum will continue to update you on this story as well as any other news that shapes the restoration industry.

Article taken from The Restoration Forum

 

Tags: psp program, insurance, restoration, state farm, premire service program, homeowners insurance

New York DKI Member Companies Create NewYorkDKIMembers.org

Posted on Fri, Dec 03, 2010 @ 10:25 AM

describe the image

NewYorkDKIMembers.org consists of New York Member Companies of Disaster Kleenup International, Inc. (DKI)DKI is a network of the leading, independent property damage restoration contractors across North America. New York DKI Member Companies provide full service to their customers: Emergency response, water damage mitigation, mold remediation, complete reconstruction and much more 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, returning damaged property to pre-loss condition fast and efficiently, delivering complete satisfaction to their consumer, insurance, and corporate customers.

Disaster Kleenup International was founded in 1974 by a small group of restoration contractors seeking the benefits of a collaborative business and personal network. Led by the late Ed York in the 70's, Martin Berry in the 80's, and Derry Strong on the 90's, the DKI network established a reputation in the market for high quality property restoration services throughout the United States and Canada.

Led today by Dale Sailer, President and CEO of Disaster Kleenup International and its parent company DKI Services Corporation since 2002, DKI is proud to be North America's largest disaster restoration contracting organization.

New York DKI Member Companies are dedicated to ensuring a smooth and comprehensive recovery of your property throughout the entire mitigation and restoration process. Our years of experience have given us the ability to complete the most extensive large loss recovery projects.

As North America’s largest disaster restoration contracting organization in North America, DKI is committed to providing exceptional customer service, disaster response planning and emergency response services across the United States and Canada.

DKI returns damaged risk to its pre-loss condition quickly and efficiently, delivering complete satisfaction to all of our customers.

DKI Loss Services is available 24-hours a day, 365 days a year to assist with full-service emergency planning, emergency response and restoration services. These include emergency response, water damage mitigation, fire and contents cleaning, mold remediation, complete reconstruction and much more. 

DKI holds itself to the highest standards in the industry

- Response time of 2 hours or less for emergency services
- Comprehensive claims management processing platform
- Over $1.5 billion in restoration work annually
- Largest inventory of equipment in North America
- Unparalleled coverage with over 350 services locations
- One in six Certified Restorers® is a DKI Member

 

Tags: emergency response, dki, new york dki member company, new york, insurance claim, disaster kleenup international, disaster restoration, new york dki member companies, commercial property damage

Are You Deep Frying a Turkey This Holiday Season?

Posted on Mon, Nov 15, 2010 @ 10:29 AM

Safety First...

Many people on Long Island deep fry turkeys during the holiday season. However, if you don't take precautions, you may end up with an injury or fire. Deep Fryers can be dangerous because:

  • Many units easily tip over, spilling the five gallons of hot oil within the cooking pot.
  • If the cooking pot is overfilled with oil, the oil may spill out of the unit when the turkey is placed into the cooking pot. Oil may hit the burner/flames causing a fire to engulf the entire unit.
  • Partially frozen turkeys placed into the fryer can cause a spillover effect. This too, may result in an extensive fire.
  • With no thermostat controls, the units also have the potential to overheat the oil to the point of combustion.
  • The sides of the cooking pot, lid and pot handles get dangerously hot, posing severe burn hazards.

Advanced Restoration wants you and your family to have a safe and happy Thanksgiving. Just follow these simple cooking and safety rules:

Deep Fried Turkey Cooking Tips:

  • Follow your fryer’s instructions.
  • Only deep fry smaller turkeys—up to 12 pounds.
  • Use oils with high smoke points such as peanut, canola and safflower. Peanut oil adds flavor, but it can be a concern if guests have peanut allergies.
  • To determine how much oil you’ll need, put the turkey in the basket and place in the pot. Add water until it reaches one to two inches above the turkey. Lift the turkey out, and use a ruler to measure the distance from the water to the top of the fryer. Pour out the water and dry the fryer completely.
  • Remember that it can take anywhere from 20 minutes to an hour to heat the oil, depending on the outside temp. wind and weather.
  • Before frying, pat the turkey dry with paper towels to keep the hot oil from spattering and popping.
  • Slowly lower the turkey into the oil, and maintain an oil temp of 350ºF. Fry turkey for three to four minutes per pound or about 35 to 42 minutes for a 10- to 12-pound turkey.

Safety Tips:

  • Turkey fryers should always be used outdoors a safe distance from buildings and any other material that can burn.
  • Never use turkey fryers on wooden decks or in garages.
  • Make sure the fryers are used on a flat surface to reduce accidental tipping.
  • Never leave the fryer unattended. Most units do not have thermostat controls. If you don't watch the fryer carefully, the oil will continue to heat until it catches fire.
  • Never let children or pets near the fryer when in use. Even after use, never allow children or pets near the turkey fryer. The oil inside the cooking pot can remain dangerously hot, hours after use.
  • To avoid oil spillover, do not overfill the fryer.
  • Use well-insulated potholders or oven mitts when touching pot or lid handles. If possible, wear safety goggles to protect your eyes from oil splatter.
  • Make sure the turkey is completely thawed and be careful with marinades. Oil and water don't mix, and water causes oil to spill over, causing a fire or even an explosion hazard.
  • The National Turkey Federation recommends refrigerator thawing and to allow approximately 24 hours for every five pounds of bird thawed in the refrigerator.
  • Keep an all-purpose fire extinguisher nearby. Never use water to extinguish a grease fire. Remember to use your best judgment when attempting to fight a fire. If the fire is manageable, use an all-purpose fire extinguisher. If the fire increases, immediately call 9-1-1 for help.
  • Even after use, never allow children or pets near the turkey fryer. The oil inside the cooking pots remains dangerously hot, hours after use.

Watch a video on how to deep fry a turkey.

 

Tags: safety tips, fire, turkey, deep fry turkey, cooking tips, deep frying a turkey, precautions

Insurance Journal