Property Damage & Disaster Restoration Blog: Long Island & New York City

Long Island After the Storms: Replacing Damaged Building Materials

Posted on Sun, Apr 25, 2010 @ 04:29 PM

 

We have received hundreds of calls from people all over Long Island telling us they had and in some cases still have, water in their basement due to groundwater.  As in most cases, it was not covered by their insurance company.  Which means you have either cleaned it up yourself or paid a company like Advanced Restoration Corporation to mitigate the water damage for you. 

The basement is now cleaned up and dried.  But that brings up the million dollar question......what do you do with the basement now?  If it was a finished basement that you used as living space and/or work space, how do you rebuild?  Or do you leave it unfinished now not wanting to take on the un-budgeted expense of the reconstruction in the off chance of having to go through it all over again if we are hit with another series of severe storms.  That is a choice every Long Island homeowner who was affected by these recent storms has to make.  For the sake of this blog, we are going to assume that you have decided to go through with the reconstruction. 

Let me start by stating that building materials can get wet.  Sheetrock, carpet, and paint are all made with water at some point during their production processes.  Usually after the materials are dried they are stronger and more durable than before they were wet.  Wood can get wet.  The lumber yards are exactly that.  Yards.  Giant lots of land used to store building materials before they are sold and used to construct homes and buildings.  They are not called lumber garages.    Chances are the studs that make up your house had been wet numerous times before the builder used them to frame your home. 

It is not a question of if something gets wet is it unsalvageable.  It is a question of how quickly you react when building materials do get wet. The faster the action the greater the chances of salvaging ALL the affected building materials.

There is something you can do that not many people have caught on to yet and none of the professionals on TV talk about just because they have yet to go through the experience of having their home saturated by water.  You can rebuild with building materials that can withstand an intrusion of water. 

Of course it is a bit more expensive to rebuild with this in mind and every homeowner is going to have see what works best for their budget and quality of life.  But here are some things to think about when rebuilding your basement:

Install ceramic tile as your flooring.  Carpet can get wet and be salvaged if dried timely and professionally, vinyl does not absorb the water but traps it underneath so that demolition is inevitable, the same with any type of wood flooring that would have to have a vapor barrier installed underneath  The best choice to finish a floor in a basement short of polishing the concrete is ceramic tile.  It is not a porous material so it does not absorb moisture and mold will not grow on the ceramic.  (Mold will grow on the dirt that is on the ceramic tile but will not start eating the tile away like it would on a porous material like sheetrock or carpet.)  And the grout allows the water vapor to escape from underneath the tile in the drying process.  Put an area rug on top of the tile that is much easier to remove and have cleaned that typical wall to wall carpeting.  

Do not use ANY vinyl.  I know vinyl makes it very easy to clean and keep on top off but it is the worst material (short of asbestos) to use as a finished building material.  Anything that vinyl covers that gets wet 99.9% of the time has to be removed.  Vinyl acts as a vapor barrier that traps the moisture behind it and does not allow the building materials to dry.  Which causes mold growth and usually increases the dollar value of the project.  Use standard wood base trim or carpet cove base.  They can both allow the walls to be dried in place or they both can be easily detached and reset once the drying process is over.

Use Concrete Board for the lower walls.  Do not install regular gypsum drywall on the lower walls.  Use concrete board that builders use in bathrooms to protect against moisture in the shower / tub areas.  They come in 4' x 8' sheets.  Just turn them on their side and install them on the lower 4' of the basement walls.  The great value of cement board is does not rot, warp, grow mold, or deteriorate, when subjected to water.

* If you decide that you are going to install standard drywall on the lower walls please make sure that the sheetrock is elevated 1/2" to 3/4" off the ground and is not sitting directly on the concrete.  If the drywall is resting directly on the concrete floor you will always have a transference of moisture from the concrete to to the dryer sheetrock which eventually will turn into a long term mold problem.  See the picture below. 


Use Only Flat Paint.  Any semi-gloss, high gloss or even eggshell finishes creates a vapor barrier that does not allow the materials behind it to dry naturally in the event of an intrusion.

Use American Clay Earth Plasters as your wall finishes American Clay Earth Plasters are a natural, environmentally friendly way to finish any interior. Non-toxic and made in the USA, these plasters are an alternative to cement, acrylic and lime plasters, offering superior color, richness, texture and depth not found with other finishes.  They also help control the inside ambient temperatures in the room(s0 it is installed on the walls.  They absorb excess moisture in the warmer months and release moisture n the environment during the colder dryer months.  This also gives it the ability to permit the drying of the building materials it is installed over.  

If you are in the Long Island and New York City areas and have any questions and/or need any assistance in dealing with your property damage claim please do not hesitate to contact Advanced Restoration Corporation.  We are Disaster Kleenup International (DKI) Member company.  DKI has over 150 member companies located throughout the United States.  Click here to find one in your area.

 

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Advanced Restoration Receives a 2009 Constant Contact All Star Award

Posted on Fri, Apr 23, 2010 @ 10:30 AM

advanced restoration corporation long island new york city property damage disaster restoration

Constant Contact recognizes Advanced Restoration Corporation
 for commitment to best practices in email marketing.

West Babylon, New York - April 23, 2010 - Advanced Restoration Corporation, today announced that it has received a 2009 All-Star Award from Constant Contact®, Inc., a leading provider of email marketing, event marketing, and online survey tools for small organizations.  Advanced Restoration Corporation was selected for meeting Constant Contact's best-practice standards for the use of Email Marketing throughout 2009.

"Constant Contact provides an excellent marketing resource that allows Advanced Restoration the ability to effectively communicate with our clients," said Gary Matzelle, Marketing Director, Advanced Restoration Corporation. "The marketing tools provided by Constant Contact have helped to build and reinforce our company's brand and image."

Advanced Restoration received a 2009 Constant Contact All-Star Award for demonstrating best practices in the effective use of Constant Contact Email Marketing in the following areas:

  • Frequency of campaigns
  • Open rates
  • Bounce rates
  • Click through rates

"Our customers work hard to build strong relationships with their customers through email marketing and some, such as Advanced Restoration Corporation, truly excel in this effort," said Gail Goodman, CEO, Constant Contact. "We created our All-Star Awards to highlight those customers who are passionately committed to following our best practices as they work to improve their customer communications. We're proud of the role we play in helping Advanced Restoration be successful and we look forward to continuing to assist the company with its marketing efforts."

###
About Constant Contact, Inc.
With more than 350,000 customers, Constant Contact, Inc. is a leading provider of email marketing, event marketing, and online surveys for small businesses, nonprofits, and member associations. Founded in 1995, Constant Contact helps small organizations grow stronger customer relationships by delivering professional, low cost, easy-to-use online tools backed with award-winning support, education and personal coaching. Constant Contact is a publicly traded company (Nasdaq: CTCT) with offices located in Waltham, Mass.; Loveland, Colo.; and Delray, Fla. To learn more, please visit http://www.constantcontact.com/ or call 781-472-8100.

About Advanced Restoration Corporation
As a preferred vendor for multiple insurance companies, Advanced Restoration Corporation is a leading service provider in the property damage restoration industry. With a combined 75 years experience, Advanced Restoration is a family-owned and operated disaster response/property damage restoration company specializing in fire and smoke damage, water damage and mold remediation. Advanced Restoration services Long Island and the New York Metro area.  To learn more, please visit http://www.advancedrestoration.com/ or call (800) 693-6263.

Media Contact
Gary Matzelle
Advanced Restoration Corporation
(800) 693-6263
Email: [email protected]

Rosalind Morville
Constant Contact
(339) 222-5772
Email: [email protected]

Tags: marketing, new york, advanced restoration corporation, constant contact

The ReUse People (TRP), Long Island Building Deconstruction, and Advanced Restoration Corporation

Posted on Fri, Apr 16, 2010 @ 08:14 PM

Advanced Restoration Corporation is proud to partner with The Reuse People (TRP) on all our Building Deconstruction projects to make the Long Island Community the Leader in Building Deconstruction and Building Material Reuse in New York and throughout the country.

By partnering with us, The ReUse People are able to expand into the Long Island market to promote Building Deconstruction and the salvage and sale of reusable building materials while diverting construction and demolition (C&D) waste from our overburdened landfills.

These services are among the first steps in the green building process. Furthermore, tax-deductible donations of reusable materials to TRP, a nonprofit 501(c)3 corporation, provide a faster payback and better return-on-investment than any other product or service offered by the green building industry on Long Island.

How The ReUse People (TRP) Started

The ReUse People (TRP) started in April, 1993, with a drive for building materials to help the flood victims in Tijuana, Mexico. The drive, Project Valle Verde, was planned and coordinated with the mayors of Tijuana and San Diego, the San Diego Chamber of Commerce, the County Board of Supervisors, San Diego Gas and Electric Company, Waste Management, and the Building Industry Association.
 
On April 23 and 24, contractors, other private companies, public agencies and the citizens of San Diego donated over 400 tons of building materials valued at $1.2 million. Twenty-seven tractor trailers crossed the border carrying this material in an unprecedented demonstration of bi-national cooperation and assistance.
 
The success of Project Valle Verde demonstrated the need for used building materials and the impact of this need on our already overused and over committed landfills.
 
The ReUse People started as Building Materials Distributors in San Diego in 1993 and, due to a name conflict with an existing corporation, the name was soon changed to The ReUse People.

Who Benefits from Our Partnership On Long Island?

  • All of us through a better environment on Long Island
  • Low income families who cannot afford to buy new building materials
  • Building deconstruction can also lead to the creation of new jobs and businesses
  • Building owners by virtue of tax donations
  • Architects, builders and contractors through better service to their clients
  • Reduced unemployment strengthens the Long Island economy directly as well as indirectly in areas such as retail sales and housing

While we obtain reusable building materials from a variety of sources, our own deconstruction efforts and those of over 30 TRP-Certified Deconstruction Contractors throughout the country contribute over 90 percent of them.
 
Whether you are an architect, general building contractor, building owner, or government agency on Long Island we stand ready to provide you with a package of benefits including:

  • Environmentally sound demolition (We like the words building deconstruction)
  • Building materials salvage
  • Advanced Restoration Corporation's skilled building deconstruction technicians
  • Tax donations for all the materials donated to The ReUse People (TRP)
  • Lower overall project costs
  • The assurance that someone, somewhere reuses the salvageable building materials generated from your project(s) on Long Island

 

The ReUse People (TRP) President - Ted Reiff

 

Prior to founding The ReUse People (TRP) in 1995, Ted Reiff was managing partner with an investment banking firm that provided financial services to young technology companies. Now, in addition to guiding TRP's national expansion program, he consults with private companies and government bodies on a variety of demolition and waste diversion projects. A graduate of Ohio State University and a licensed demolition contractor, Ted served three terms as board president of I Love a Clean San Diego and is an advisor to Urban Habitat Chicago.

 

The ReUse People (TRP) Long Island Regional Manager - Mike Yurish

Mike holds a B.S. degree in environmental science from SUNY Purchase, New York, and has been an amateur deconstructionist for some 20 years. He serves on the board of directors of the ReCONNstruction Center in New Britain, Connecticut, and is a licensed realtor and appraisal trainee in New Jersey. A resident of Connecticut, Mike currently works as a senior print technician for a major printing company.  

Advanced Restoration Corporation - Eric Martin

 

Eric Martin has been in the family business for over 16 years.  He is certified by the Institute of Inspection, Cleaning, and Restoration Certification (IICRC) in Water Damage Mitigation and Advanced Structural Drying as well as holding his certification by the Restoration Industry Association (RIA) in Mold Remediation.  Eric has worked in New York City for 8 months after 9/11 cleaning up the building surrounding Ground Zero.  He also worked in New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina.    A Green Risk Professional from Vale Training Institute he is also a member of the Communications Committee from the U.S. Green Building Council's Long Island (USGBC-LI) chapter in charge of handling USGBC-LI's social media accounts.

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Advanced Restoration Corporation is proud to partner with The Reuse People (TRP) on all our Building Deconstruction projects to make the Long Island Community the Leader in Building Deconstruction and Building Material Reuse in New York and throughout the country.

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Building Deconstruction: Saving Long Island Landfills...One Building At A Time

Posted on Tue, Apr 13, 2010 @ 05:05 PM

 

What a beautiful weekend we just had on Long Island.  The Storms of March 2010 are behind us. Those of us in the insurance industry are slowing down a bit catching up on all our paperwork, riding the crest of the wave down to the end of its journey.  It felt like Spring for the first time for me this weekend.

On Sunday, I drove out to Sag Harbor, New York out on the East End of Long Island in the area most notably known as The Hamptons.  I went to inspect a home that was at the end of its use.  The new owners purchased the house, basically for the land, and plan to build a new one in its place.

But what do you do with the old house?  Just because the home is at the end of its life cycle, does not mean the building materials that make up the house are at the end of their usage. But since the advent of "mass production" the acceptable way to get rid of the old homes on Long Island (and the rest of the country) was to knock it down or "demo" with a bulldozer and dump all the construction and demolition (C&D) waste in the landfills. But there are other "greener" more cost-effective practices that can benefit the homeowner, the environment, and the Long Island community.

I inspected the house with a representative of The Reuse People (TRP). TRP is a Non-Profit Organization based in California with branches all over the United States. TRP keeps reusable and recyclable building materials out of overburdened landfills by promoting building deconstruction and channeling the building material back into the marketplace through donations and sales at its network of retail outlets. TRP works closely with local building deconstruction contractors to try and salvage up to 80 percent of the building materials (varies depending upon age and type of materials) during the building deconstruction process. These services are among the first steps in the green building process.

The house is a roughly 2,000SF ranch with an unfinished basement, attic, and small detached garage built in 1981. The previous owner had used it as a rental property and the house was not in the best of condition. The kitchen cabinets and wood floors were not salvageable due to water damage and type of materials. The wood floors today come in short pieces and are less valuable than longer older pieces. They are also very hard to piece back together. The single-pane wood windows and hallow core doors did not have much value either. Also the brick fireplace was relatively new and made with much stronger mortar than older masonry work. Because the mortar is much stronger, it is hard to clean the brick and reuse the material in a future construction project(s).

Building deconstruction is more labor intensive due to the care our deconstruction technicians must use when deconstructing the reusable building materials to save their value. We take the ultimate care in deconstructing, handling and packing the reusable building materials because too much breakage can disrupt the whole economics of the project and have one unhappy building owner or homeowner. A 2,000SF house takes five deconstruction technicians four weeks to deconstruct.

The representative of The Reuse People estimated the total value of usable building materials at roughly $20,000. That means the homeowner would get a tax deductible donation (percentage would depend on building owner or homeowner's income tax bracket) when he or she donated the reusable building materials to The Reuse People for distribution and resale in their network.

Below is a comparison of the cost of both Building Deconstruction vs. Demolition for this particular project in Sag Harbor, Long Island.

Process:

Deconstruction

Demolition

Cost:

$25,000

$15,000

Donations:

$20,000

 

Tax Deduction:

$5,000

 

Total Cost:

$20,000

$15,000

For this house, it is more cost effective to demolish the house than it is to perform any soft stripping or building deconstruction because there is very little value in the minimal reusable building materials we could have salvage from the home. In today's economy, like most of the Long Island green building industry, cost is still the driving factor over "the right thing to do".

Below is a list of building deconstruction projects that The Reuse People have worked on and the total dollar value of reusable building materials salvaged from each project.

City

Square Feet

Donation Value

Newport Beach, CA

5,523

$182,346

Napa, CA

3,342

$102,025

Oakland, CA

1,400

$74,144

Santa Barbara, CA

2,100

$57,000

Denver, CO

2,900

$125,566

Chicago, IL

2,200

$110,096

Chicago, IL

$2,800

$118,150

Bellevue, WA

3,800

$175,600

Kenosha, WI

2,250

$98,000

The list of soft stripping and building deconstruction project above that have overseen by The Reuse People throughout the United States prove that building deconstruction on Long Island can be a cost effective green building alternative to demolition if there is value in the reusable building materials.

It is Advanced Restoration Corporation's earnest desire to make the Long Island Community a Leader in Building Deconstruction and Building Material Reuse in New York and throughout the country. Please feel free to contact us if you have any questions regarding our Soft Stripping or Building Deconstruction Services on Long Island.

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Property Damage: Long Island After the Storms of March, 2010

Posted on Sun, Apr 11, 2010 @ 04:04 PM

Long Island, New York City and the rest of New York and the Northeast was devastated from the recent flooding caused by torrential rain, wind, and storm damage.  A majority of flooded basements across Long Island were caused by ground water due to over-saturation of the earth.  Insurance companies do not cover groundwater under their policies. 

You need to have a separate Flood Insurance if you fall into the Flood Coverage Area.  And that only covers property damage to structures that are above grade.  Basements are not above grade so they would be excluded from those policies. 

That means there were many homeowners throughout Long Island and New York City that had flooded basements that were not covered by their insurance policy.   

For some people this is too much.  There are a lot of people in hardship right now across Long Island due to the economic times we live in.  If they did not hire a professional restoration company or water damage cleanup company like Advanced Restoration Corporation, a DKI Member Company, they had to extract / remove the water themselves or rely on friends and/or family to help them out.

But just because the water is removed or extracted, that does not mean the job is over.  The wet porous building materials need to be removed, or dried along with the structural wood members and concrete so their moisture content levels are reduced to regional acceptable standards.  

And some people will just ignore the water in the basement or the leaky roof, thinking it will dry out on its own.  And technically, everything that gets wet will eventually dry, if it can.  And not every water intrusion causes severe mold contamination.  It all depends on the size of the area and the lenght of time the area has been wet without receiving any attention.

At this  point you should ask yourself this:

How long will it take?  Can the wet building materials dry out before mold contamination can occur (usually 48-72 hours in optimum conditions)? 

If wet building materials are not addressed in a timely fashion then the problem magnifies exponentially over time until it becomes a much bigger and more expensive issue. 

Please do not hesitate to Contact Us for any assistance or guidance if you have or even think you have a mold issue in the Long Island and New York City areas.  We would be more than happy to speak with you.


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mold Removal / Mold Remediation Services Long Island & New York City

by

Advanced Restoration Corporation

a DKI Member Company

 
 
 
Long Island Building Demolition
 
by
 
Advanced Restoration Corporation
 
a DKI Member Company

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"A Brief Guide to Mold, Moisture, and Your Home"

Posted on Wed, Mar 31, 2010 @ 10:00 AM

The recent storms that hit the Northeast have caused major flooding and property damage to homes and businesses. The aftermath of the storms have property owners dealing with mold and moisture issues. 

Mold Basics...

The key to mold control is moisture control.
If mold is a problem is in your home, you should clean up the mold promptly and fix the water problem. It is important to dry water-damaged areas within 24-48 hours to prevent mold growth. 

  

Why is mold growing in my home?

Molds are part of the natural environment.  Outdoors, molds play a part in nature by breaking down dead organic matter such as fallen leaves and dead trees, but indoors, mold growth should be avoided.  Molds reproduce by means of tiny spores; the spores are invisible to the naked eye and float through outdoor and indoor air.  Mold may begin growing indoors when mold spores land on surfaces that are wet.  There are many types of mold, and none of them will grow without water or moisture.

Can mold cause health problems?

Molds are usually not a problem indoors, unless mold spores land on a wet or damp spot and begin growing.  Molds have the potential to cause health problems. Molds produce allergens (substances that can cause allergic reactions), irritants, and in some cases, potentially toxic substances (mycotoxins).  Inhaling or touching mold or mold spores may cause allergic reactions in sensitive individuals.  Allergic responses include hay fever-type symptoms, such as sneezing, runny nose, red eyes, and skin rash (dermatitis). Allergic reactions to mold are common.  They can be immediate or delayed.  Molds can also cause asthma attacks in people with asthma who are allergic to mold. In addition, mold exposure can irritate the eyes, skin, nose, throat, and lungs of both mold-allergic and non-allergic people.  Symptoms other than the allergic and irritant types are not commonly reported as a result of inhaling mold.  Research on mold and health effects is ongoing.  This brochure provides a brief overview; it does not describe all potential health effects related to mold exposure. For more detailed information consult a health professional.  You may also wish to consult your state or local health department.

How do I get rid of mold?

It is impossible to get rid of all mold and mold spores indoors; some mold spores will be found floating through the air and in house dust.  The mold spores will not grow if moisture is not present.  Indoor mold growth can and should be prevented or controlled by controlling moisture indoors.  If there is mold growth in your home, you must clean up the mold and fix the water problem.  If you clean up the mold, but don't fix the water problem, then, most likely, the mold problem will come back.

 

Mold Tips: 

Fix plumbing leaks and other water problems as soon as possible.  Dry all items completely.

Scrub mold off hard surfaces with detergent and water, and dry completely.

Absorbent or porous materials, such as ceiling tiles and carpet, may have to be thrown away if they become moldy.  Mold can grow on or fill in the empty spaces and crevices of porous materials, so the mold may be difficult or impossible to remove completely.

Avoid exposing yourself or others to mold.

Do not paint or caulk moldy surfaces.  Clean up the mold and dry the surfaces before painting.  Paint applied over moldy surfaces is likely to peel.

If you are unsure about how to clean an item, or if the item is expensive or of sentimental value, you may wish to consult a specialist.  Specialists in furniture repair, restoration, painting, art restoration and conservation, carpet and rug cleaning, water damage, and fire or water restoration are commonly listed in phone books.  Be sure to ask for and check references.  Look for specialists who are affiliated with professional organizations. For more information on mold, visit the EPA website.

Source: Environmental Protection Agency

 

 

Tags: disaster, water extraction long island, ny water damage company, structural drying, flooding, flood long island, mold, groundwater, black mold, advanced restoration, advanced restoration corporation, mold remediation, homeowner tips, flood damage, flood, storm damage, catastrophe, nor'easter

Do You Have Water or Wind Damage?

Posted on Sun, Mar 14, 2010 @ 10:31 PM

24 Hour Emergency Water Removal, tarping, and Cleanup Services

One of the worst things that can happen is having a pipe break or water heater malfunction that causes a water intrusion to flood your basement or saturate your home or office.  Advanced Restoration's Disaster and Emergency Response Time minimizes  damage that can be caused by a flood.  Our water extraction services have assisted many homes and business throughout Long Island and New York City.  We extract water due to:

Advanced Restoration Corporation  is a DKI Member Company

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Flooding Rains Will Soak New York, New Jersey and Long Island

Posted on Thu, Mar 11, 2010 @ 08:32 PM

March 11 (Bloomberg) -- A slow-moving storm will drop as much as 4 inches (10 centimeters) of rain on New York City starting tonight and lasting until next week, according to the National Weather Service.

Manhattan is forecast to receive about 3.5 inches, while other parts of the city may get a half-inch more, said Joe Pollina, a weather service meteorologist in Upton, New York.

"We do expect some urban flooding," Pollina said by telephone. "The city and parts of Long Island could see ponding on roadways, with roads closed due to flooding."

Flood watches and warnings extend from Long Island to Indiana, according to the weather service. Rivers and streams across the region, including Connecticut, the lower Hudson River valley and New Jersey, could swell their banks, Pollina said.

"It just seems to be a rather slow-moving storm," Pollina said. "It is just hanging around. Rain will start tonight, continuing through Sunday and we even have showers forecast through Monday. It doesn't dry out until Tuesday."

--Editors: Charlotte Porter, David Marino

To contact the reporter on this story: Brian K. Sullivan in Boston at [email protected]

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Dan Stets at [email protected]

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Environmental Benefits of Building Deconstruction On Long Island

Posted on Wed, Feb 10, 2010 @ 08:31 PM

Buildings have a significant impact on the environment.  In the U.S., buildings represent more than 50 percent of the nation's wealth. New construction and renovation account for approximately $800 billion or approximately 13 percent of the Gross Domestic Product and employ over 10 million people.  The construction industry uses 40% of all extracted materials.  Thirty percent of all energy used is a result of the construction industry and the built environment.

By reducing waste generation, deconstruction also reduces climate gas emissions, and abates the need for new landfills and incinerators. Perhaps most importantly, it helps to steer the C&D industry away from traditional consumption and disposal patterns and towards sustainability and reuse. Reducing the industry's consumption of virgin materials helps preserve natural resources and protect the environment from the air, ground, and water pollution related to extraction, processing, and disposal of raw materials.

Each year the United States buries about 33 million tons of wood related construction and demolition debris in our landfills. As anaerobic microorganisms decompose this wood, it will release about 5 million tons of carbon equivalent in the form of methane gas.

This is equivalent to the yearly emissions of 3,736,000 passenger cars.

Producing new building materials from recycled, rather than virgin, materials consumes less energy. Consuming less energy means burning fewer fossil fuels, which in turn means producing fewer green house gases.

Every ton of wood that is reused avoids the creation of 60 pounds of green house gases that would have been created to harvest and mill new lumber.

The Environmental Protection Agency On Building Deconstruction

Building deconstruction is a "grave-to-cradle" program that helps take care of the enormous stock of buildings reaching the end of their useful lives while simultaneously reducing the pressure to mine or harvest natural resources for new construction, reducing the need for landfill space, and creating new jobs.

Construction activities consume 60% of the total raw materials used in the U. S. economy.

Estimates that 136 million tons of building-related C&D waste is generated annually, of which 92% is from renovation and demolition work.

Only 20% to 30% of C&D waste is being recycled.

Tags: environmental, demolition waste, construction and demolition waste, environmental benefits building deconstruction, advanced restoration corporation, building deconstruction, building deconstruction long island, build green, environmental benefits

Possible Long Island Economic Benefits of Building Deconstruction

Posted on Tue, Feb 09, 2010 @ 08:49 PM

The economic benefits of deconstruction are substantial.  One of the biggest challenges to "greening" businesses is overcoming the false perception that environmentally-sound business practices necessarily will increase costs and decrease profits. Building deconstruction is helping break that myth. 

Old buildings on Long Island are an untapped valuable resource.  When a building is no longer fit for use and has to come down, does this happen just as all of its parts and components wear out?  Most old buildings have some systems and materials with useful lives.  The trick is efficiently identifying the materials and getting them out of the building.  When redeveloping a Long Island property, it is difficult to see the old buildings as anything but obstacles. Also, it is important to consider whether their contents and/or components may actually be resources that have net value.

You can get a tax deduction.  The reusable waste from your project could be worth a significant tax write-off.  You can donate your salvaged building materials to numerous not-for-profit organizations on Long Island and receive a tax-deductible receipt to help offset the higher labor costs that building deconstruction requires (versus demolition).  Advanced Restoration Corp. provides all of our clients with a detailed photo-documented inventory of salvaged materials for tax purposes. 

Building deconstruction reduces overall project costs.  Buildings can be deconstructed more cheaply than they can be demolished.  Building deconstruction reduces the cost of waste disposal.  For every ton of material diverted from a landfill, there is one less ton of disposal costs. To the extent deconstructed materials can be incorporated into a new building or space on the same site, the savings are two-fold-reduced disposal costs and new material costs.

Tags: economic benefits, green, green building, advanced restoration corporation, building deconstruction, building deconstruction long island, economic benefits of building deconstruction, green construction, build green, sustainable practices, c & d waste, tax donation

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