Property Damage & Disaster Restoration Blog: Long Island & New York City

The Power of Disaster Kleenup International (DKI)

Posted on Mon, Oct 24, 2011 @ 12:29 PM

It has been awhile since our last blog post.  In that time we have seen a few disasters hit the Long Island and New York City metropolitan area.  There was the flooding due to heavy rains on August 14th and Hurricane Irene that blew through here a few weeks later.  Unfortunately, both instances caused severe property damage to many homes and businesses throughout our area. 

Advanced Restoration's call volume increased 800% over those 2 months compared to the same time last year when there was no severe weather occurrences.  Our staff handled the tremendous increase in workload with the usual care and professionalism our clients are used to.  They were tremendous in assisting the plethora of very upset and distraught home and business owners. But honestly we would not have been able to pull it all off without our association with Disaster Kleenup International (DKI), which we have been a Member Company of for over 3 years. 

For those of you who might not be familiar with DKI here is a recap. 

Disaster Kleenup International is North America’s largest property damage restoration contracting organization.  Disaster Kleenup International (DKI) was founded in 1974 by a small group of restoration contractors seeking the benefits of a collaborative business and personal network.  In the early years of its history, the DKI organization focused on providing networking opportunities for Members and establishing a reputation in the marketplace for high-quality property restoration.  The DKI organization has expanded its offerings to include educational and training programs, co-operative buying opportunities, national networking events, corporate branding and marketing efforts and much more. 

The ability to provide quality disaster response planning and emergency response services to clients throughout the United States and Canada is a main reason that DKI is North America’s largest disaster restoration contracting organizations.  With over 400 service locations throughout the United States and Canada DKI is available 24 hours a day, 365 days a year.  DKI members return damaged property to its pre-loss condition quickly and efficiently, delivering complete satisfaction to our customers.

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If it was not for this association we would not have been able to service the influx of calls we received during those catastrophes.  On Sunday August 14th, the first two calls we received utilized over 250 pieces of our drying equipment.  Between those two jobs and all our running jobs we only had a few more pieces of equipment left to service all the other calls that were coming into our office.  I placed a call to DKI Member Company Royal Plus in Maryland, and less than 8 hours later they had an eighteen wheeler filled with over 750 pieces of drying equipment at our office to help us service all our customers.  The truck was onsite here at my office for just under two weeks.  And when Hurricane Irene hit Long Island, Royal Plus sent that truck back up again so we could service all our clients that were affected.  Also with the other New York DKI Member Companies, we were referring losses to each other based upon our geographical area.  It was all about servicing the client while putting aside each companies personal interests.

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Besides the equipment rental, every DKI Member is always around to give me their advice or share an experience that they learned from.  I have learned so much just from the Member Companies in the DKI Northeast Chapter.  It has been invaluable. 

Tags: hurricane irene, long island, property damage, dki, advanced restoration, disaster kleenup international, new york city, severe weather

An Air Quality Day is Forecast in the NY Region for Today!

Posted on Mon, Jun 28, 2010 @ 10:35 AM
(Monday, June 28, 2010)

URGENT!

The New York State Department of Transportation has declared that today (Monday, June 28, 2010) is an Air Quality Action Day in the downstate metro area due to forecasted high levels of ground-level ozone pollution in parts of the region (please visit the Clean Air NY Web site for more information http://app.streamsend.com/c/11868351/358/BTDvCz2/O8S8?redirect_to=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.cleanairny.org%2FLocalAirQuality%2FDefault.aspx). While today is still a day when people can go about most of their normal activities, such as going to work, driving may be one of the most polluting activities that you do today, and we encourage everyone to leave their cars at home if possible.

Ground-level ozone is a respiratory irritant that can trigger asthma attacks and aggravate emphysema, bronchitis and other respiratory ailments. Children, people with pre-existing respiratory or heart conditions, people doing strenuous outdoor work or exercise and the elderly are particularly vulnerable to the effects of ozone.

Here are several simple steps you can take on Air Quality Action Days to prevent pollution:

  • Combine errands into a single trip, rather than separate trips. This can help save time and reduce the amount of pollution emitted from your vehicle.
  • Take the subway, bus or train when possible.
  • Postpone unnecessary trips. Avoiding motor vehicle trips on Air Quality Action Days will prevent the formation of air pollution.
  • Refuel your vehicle in the evening when it's cooler outside.
  • Avoid letting your vehicle idle, such as at the fast food or bank teller drive-thru.
  • Postpone using gas-powered gardening equipment such as lawn mowers on Air Quality Action Days. Wait for a day when air quality is better.
  • Forward this message to your family and friends.

 

To learn more about improving air quality or if you were forwarded this message and want us to send updates to your own e-mail address, visit CleanAirNY.org or call 1-877-ILUVAIR (1-877-458-8247).

Clean Air NY is sponsored by the New York State Department of Transportation in support of regionwide air-quality efforts.

Tags: air quality, advanced restoration, clean air, air testing, ny, forecast, respiratory, heart conditions

TODAY Has Been Declared an Air Quality Action Day!

Posted on Fri, Jun 04, 2010 @ 10:31 AM

URGENT!
An Air Quality Action Day is forecast in our
region for today (Friday, June 4, 2010).

The New York State Department of Transportation has declared that
today (Friday, June 4, 2010) is an Air Quality Action
Day in the downstate metro area due to forecasted high levels of
ground-level ozone pollution in parts of the region (please visit
the Clean Air NY Web site for more information
http://www.cleanairny.org/LocalAirQuality/Default.aspx). While
today is still a day when people can go about most of
their normal activities, such as going to work, driving may be
one of the most polluting activities that you do today, and we
encourage everyone to leave their cars at home if possible.

Ground-level ozone is a respiratory irritant that can trigger
asthma attacks and aggravate emphysema, bronchitis and other
respiratory ailments. Children, people with pre-existing
respiratory or heart conditions, people doing strenuous outdoor
work or exercise and the elderly are particularly vulnerable to
the effects of ozone.

Here are several simple steps you can take on Air Quality Action
Days to prevent pollution:

Combine errands into a single trip, rather than separate trips.
This can help save time and reduce the amount of pollution
emitted from your vehicle.

Take the subway, bus or train when possible.

Postpone unnecessary trips.

Avoiding motor vehicle trips on Air Quality Action Days will prevent the formation of air pollution.

Refuel your vehicle in the evening when it's cooler outside.

Avoid letting your vehicle idle, such as at the fast food or bank
teller drive-thru.

Postpone using gas-powered gardening equipment such as lawn
mowers on Air Quality Action Days. Wait for a day when air
quality is better.

Forward this message to your family and friends.

To learn more about improving air quality or if you were
forwarded this message and want us to send updates to your own
e-mail address, visit CleanAirNY.org or call 1-877-ILUVAIR
(1-877-458-8247).

Clean Air NY is sponsored by the New York State Department of
Transportation in support of regionwide air-quality efforts.

511NY is New York State's official traffic and travel info
source. Whether you drive or take public transit, click here for
precisely what you need, or simply dial 511 on your phone.

Follow Clean Air NY on Facebook, Twitter, and Blogger.

You received this update because you provided your contact
information to Clean Air NY. To ensure delivery, please be sure
to add [email protected] to your e-mail address book or safe
list.

CleanAirNY.org
1-877-ILUVAIR (1-877-458-8247)
342 Broadway
Suite 404
New York, NY 10013
[email protected]

Tags: air quality, environmental, advanced restoration, clean air, environment, contents cleaning

"A Brief Guide to Mold, Moisture, and Your Home"

Posted on Wed, Mar 31, 2010 @ 10:00 AM

The recent storms that hit the Northeast have caused major flooding and property damage to homes and businesses. The aftermath of the storms have property owners dealing with mold and moisture issues. 

Mold Basics...

The key to mold control is moisture control.
If mold is a problem is in your home, you should clean up the mold promptly and fix the water problem. It is important to dry water-damaged areas within 24-48 hours to prevent mold growth. 

  

Why is mold growing in my home?

Molds are part of the natural environment.  Outdoors, molds play a part in nature by breaking down dead organic matter such as fallen leaves and dead trees, but indoors, mold growth should be avoided.  Molds reproduce by means of tiny spores; the spores are invisible to the naked eye and float through outdoor and indoor air.  Mold may begin growing indoors when mold spores land on surfaces that are wet.  There are many types of mold, and none of them will grow without water or moisture.

Can mold cause health problems?

Molds are usually not a problem indoors, unless mold spores land on a wet or damp spot and begin growing.  Molds have the potential to cause health problems. Molds produce allergens (substances that can cause allergic reactions), irritants, and in some cases, potentially toxic substances (mycotoxins).  Inhaling or touching mold or mold spores may cause allergic reactions in sensitive individuals.  Allergic responses include hay fever-type symptoms, such as sneezing, runny nose, red eyes, and skin rash (dermatitis). Allergic reactions to mold are common.  They can be immediate or delayed.  Molds can also cause asthma attacks in people with asthma who are allergic to mold. In addition, mold exposure can irritate the eyes, skin, nose, throat, and lungs of both mold-allergic and non-allergic people.  Symptoms other than the allergic and irritant types are not commonly reported as a result of inhaling mold.  Research on mold and health effects is ongoing.  This brochure provides a brief overview; it does not describe all potential health effects related to mold exposure. For more detailed information consult a health professional.  You may also wish to consult your state or local health department.

How do I get rid of mold?

It is impossible to get rid of all mold and mold spores indoors; some mold spores will be found floating through the air and in house dust.  The mold spores will not grow if moisture is not present.  Indoor mold growth can and should be prevented or controlled by controlling moisture indoors.  If there is mold growth in your home, you must clean up the mold and fix the water problem.  If you clean up the mold, but don't fix the water problem, then, most likely, the mold problem will come back.

 

Mold Tips: 

Fix plumbing leaks and other water problems as soon as possible.  Dry all items completely.

Scrub mold off hard surfaces with detergent and water, and dry completely.

Absorbent or porous materials, such as ceiling tiles and carpet, may have to be thrown away if they become moldy.  Mold can grow on or fill in the empty spaces and crevices of porous materials, so the mold may be difficult or impossible to remove completely.

Avoid exposing yourself or others to mold.

Do not paint or caulk moldy surfaces.  Clean up the mold and dry the surfaces before painting.  Paint applied over moldy surfaces is likely to peel.

If you are unsure about how to clean an item, or if the item is expensive or of sentimental value, you may wish to consult a specialist.  Specialists in furniture repair, restoration, painting, art restoration and conservation, carpet and rug cleaning, water damage, and fire or water restoration are commonly listed in phone books.  Be sure to ask for and check references.  Look for specialists who are affiliated with professional organizations. For more information on mold, visit the EPA website.

Source: Environmental Protection Agency

 

 

Tags: disaster, water extraction long island, ny water damage company, structural drying, flooding, flood long island, mold, groundwater, black mold, advanced restoration, advanced restoration corporation, mold remediation, homeowner tips, flood damage, flood, storm damage, catastrophe, nor'easter

What To Do After a Loss

Posted on Thu, Mar 18, 2010 @ 08:32 AM

Heavy rains and winds pummeled the New York Metro area this past weekend, causing major damage to many homes and businesses. If you experienced property damage, you need to know what to do after a loss. 

If you suffer a loss, the first thing to do is to notify your insurance company or its agent. You can do this by telephone, although it is a good idea to follow up with written notification. Remember, if you give the notice to your broker, rather than directly to the insurance company, you still have a responsibility to make sure that the insurance company receives notice of your claim.

It is also important to notify your insurance company promptly after any incident takes place that might result in a claim at some later date, even though no claim was made at the time the event occurred.

For example, if your dog bites a neighbor or a guest falls on your property, it should be reported to the insurance company even though you don't know whether any claim is actually going to be made against you. Your failure to notify the company promptly might allow it to deny coverage in the event a claim if filed against you at a later date.

It is also important to protect your property against further damages. For example, if the windows are broken, have them boarded up to protect against further vandalism or burglary. The cost of this type of protection is covered by, and would be reimbursed by your insurance company.

However, no permanent repairs should be made until your company or its representative has inspected the property. The company has the right to inspect the property in its damaged state, and can refuse to pay you for any damage that is repaired before inspection.

An adjuster will be sent from your insurance company to examine the damage and give you an estimate of the cost of repairs or replacement. You should also get an estimate from your own contractor to compare with the insurance company's estimate. Your contractor will probably charge a fee for this service but might credit that fee to your bill if you hire that contractor to repair and/or replace your property.

If you need assistance, your agent, broker or insurance company sales representative should help you fill out the claim form and help gather the materials you need to substantiate your loss.

In the event you are unfortunate enough to experience a major loss such as a fire or severe windstorm which has badly damaged or destroyed your home, and you are not in a position to negotiate a settlement with your company, you may want to consult an attorney or call a licensed public adjuster to act on your behalf with your insurance company.

Public adjusters are licensed by the Insurance Department. They represent you and not the insurance company. They will help you in taking inventory of your loss, securing your home from vandalism, contacting your insurance company, advising you on the extent of your coverage and help you secure the services needed to repair or rebuild you home. They will negotiate on your behalf with the adjuster from the insurance company.

A public adjuster may not charge a fee more than 12.5% of the recovery amount and must get a signed compensation agreement from you in which the amount of compensation is clearly stated. Such agreement may be cancelled up to midnight of the third business day after the date on which you have signed the compensation agreement. In addition, public adjusters may not solicit your business between the hours of 6 p.m. and 8 a.m.

Another alternative to consider when an agreement cannot be reached between you and your insurance company is the appraisal process. Every homeowner, tenant, cooperative apartment and condominium policy issued in New York contains a provision whereby you and your company select a competent and disinterested appraiser. The two appraisers, in turn, select an umpire. Each appraiser must evaluate the loss and determine the value of each item. Any disagreements between the appraisers regarding the value of any items are submitted to, and settled by the umpire. The costs of this process are paid by the policyholder and the insurance company.

Source:  NY State Insurance Department

Tags: disaster, wind damage, emergency response, water extraction long island, property damage, ny water damage company, water damage, nassau county restoration, flood long island, mold, advanced restoration, long island water damage, flood damage, flood, home repair, moisture, storm damage, catastrophe, water removal long island

New York: Being Prepared for the Unexpected!

Posted on Thu, Feb 25, 2010 @ 02:52 PM


Emergency Preparedness 
Emergency preparedness is no longer the sole concern of earthquake prone Californians and those who live in the part of the country known as "Tornado Alley." For Americans, preparedness must now account for man-made disasters as well as natural ones. Knowing what to do during an emergency is an important part of being prepared and may make all the difference when seconds count.  Heavy snow is expected to hit the Northeast today. 

Blizzards, heavy snow, freezing rain and sub-zero temperatures hit hard and frequently across the state. Even if you think you are safe and warm at home, a winter storm can become dangerous if the power is cut off. With a little planning, you can protect yourself and your family from the many hazards of winter weather, both at home and on the road.

BE AWARE OF THE FORECAST

  • Winter weather advisory. Formerly called a "travelers' advisory," this alert may be issued by the National Weather Service for a variety of severe conditions. Weather advisories may be announced for snow, blowing and drifting snow, freezing drizzle, freezing rain (when less than ice storm conditions are expected), or a combination of weather events.
  • Winter storm watch. Severe winter weather conditions may affect your area (freezing rain, sleet or heavy snow may occur either separately or in combination).
  • Winter storm warning. Severe winter weather conditions are imminent.
  • Freezing rain or freezing drizzle. Rain or drizzle is likely to freeze upon impact, resulting in a coating of ice glaze on roads and all other exposed objects.
  • Sleet. Small particles of ice, usually mixed with rain. If enough sleet accumulates on the ground, it makes travel hazardous.
  • Blizzard warning. Sustained wind speeds of at least 35 miles per hour are accompanied by considerable falling and/or blowing snow. This is the most perilous winter storm, with visibility dangerously restricted.
  • Wind chill. A strong wind combined with a temperature slightly below freezing can have the same chilling effect as a temperature nearly 50 degrees lower in a calm atmosphere. The combined cooling power of the wind and temperature on exposed flesh is called the wind-chill factor.

BE PREPARED AT HOME

  • Keep a battery-powered radio and flashlights in working order; stock extra batteries.
  • Store food that can be prepared without an electric or gas stove.
  • Stock emergency water and cooking supplies.
  • Have candles and matches available in case of a power outage.
  • Have sufficient heating fuel; regular fuel sources may be cut off.
  • Have some kind of emergency heating equipment and fuel (a kerosene heater, a gas fireplace or wood-burning stove or fireplace) so you can keep at least one room of your house warm if power is cut off. (See the fact sheet "Staying Warm in an Unheated House.")

RIDING OUT A STORM AT HOME

If you are isolated at home, listen to the radio or television for updates on weather conditions. Conserve fuel by keeping your house cooler than usual and by temporarily "closing off" heat to some rooms. When emergency heating methods must be used, maintain adequate ventilation to avoid build-up of toxic fumes. (See the fact sheet, "Staying Warm in an Unheated House.")

Dress accordingly. Layer your clothing; many layers of thin clothing are warmer than single layers of thick clothing. If you need to go outdoors or the heat is off indoors, wear mittens; they are warmer than gloves. Wear a hat; most body heat is lost through the top of the head. Cover your mouth with scarves to protect your lungs from directly inhaling extremely cold air.

If shoveling snow isn't critical, don't do it. If you must shovel snow, take your time and lift small amounts. Over-exertion can bring on a heart attack - a major cause of death during and after winter storms.

Stay safe and stay warm!

Related Article:  Ice Dams and Your Home

Source: NASD

Tags: disaster, long island, water damage, structural drying, flooding, nassau county restoration, snow, winter storm, ice damage, advanced restoration, long island water damage, restoration, homeowner tips, flood, moisture, storm damage, storm, frozen pipes, nor'easter, ice storm

Deconstructing Long Island's Construction & Demolition Waste

Posted on Fri, Feb 05, 2010 @ 12:57 PM

When buildings reach the end of their useful life, they are typically demolished and hauled to landfills.  Building implosions or ‘wrecking-ball' style demolitions are relatively inexpensive and offer a quick method of clearing sites for new structures. On the other hand, these methods create substantial amounts of waste. 

The demolition and renovation of buildings in the U.S. produces 124,670,000 tons of debris each year, according to the Deconstruction Institute. That's an awful lot when you consider that just one 2,000-square-foot wood-frame home has the potential to yield 6,000-board-feet of reusable lumber or about 85 percent of the wood framing.  That house, demolished and sent to a landfill, amounts to about 127 tons of trashed materials or about 10,000 cubic feet of debris.  This is equivalent to 33 mature trees, or the yearly output of 10 acres of planted pine (7 football fields).  Wood frame houses are good examples, since 95 percent of all houses are built that way.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency estimates that 270,000 residential units are demolished in the U.S annually.  Much of that demolition debris goes into landfills.  In this country, according the EPA, building debris (in total, not just from residential units) accounts for one-third of all solid waste, and an estimated 91 percent of that comes from renovation and demolition.  We can estimate that for every 3 square feet of deconstruction, enough lumber can be salvaged to build 1 square foot of new construction. At this rate, if deconstruction replaced residential demolition, the US could generate enough recovered wood to construct 120,000 new affordable homes each year.

Some states, including California and Massachusetts, are enacting bans, taking steps to divert up to 60% of the construction waste from landfills.  In Chicago, the city has ordinances which require almost half of the construction debris be diverted from landfills.  Thanks to some forward-thinking insurance companies who now offer a "green" policy, coverage for recycling and deconstruction costs are now a reality on some insurance policies.

Construction & Debris (C & D) Waste Facts

In 1978, there were approximately 20,000 landfills. By 1988, that number had dropped to 5,499. Currently the figure stands at 3,091. The EPA estimates that as of the 2008, only 1,234 landfills were available. 

Only 3 active landfills on Long Island as of 2009.

All landfills will eventually fail and leak leachate into ground and surface water. Plastics are not inert. State-of-the-art plastic (HDPE) landfill liners (1/10 inch or 100 mils thick) and plastic pipes allow chemicals and gases to pass through their membranes, become brittle, swell, and breakdown. 

"...82% of surveyed landfill cells had leaks while 41% had a leak area of more than 1 square feet," according to Leak Location Services, Inc. (LLSI) website (March 15, 2000).

All landfills could require remediation, but particularly landfills built in the last 60 years will require a thorough clean-up due to the disposal of highly toxic chemicals manufactured and sold since the 1940's.

The U.S. generated 143.5 million tons of building-related construction and demolition debris in 2008, but only 28% (40.2 million tons) was reused, recycled or sent to waste-to-energy facilities.

Consider that one year's debris is enough to build a wall about 30 feet high and 30 feet thick around the entire coast of the continental United States (4,993 miles).

How much do your building projects impact these numbers? Consider the following:

  • The average new construction project yields 3.9 pounds of waste per square foot of building area. Example: A 50,000-square-foot building = 97.5 tons of waste.
  • The average building demolition yields 155 pounds of waste per square foot. Example:A 50,000-square-foot building = 3,875 tons of waste.

According to the National Association of Home Builders, a typical 2,200 sq.ft. home requires 13,000 board feet of framing lumber.  If laid end to end, that framing lumber would stretch 2.5 miles.

If all the dimensional lumber used to build the 1.2 million new homes constructed in the United State each year were laid end to end, it would extend 3 million miles, the equivalent of going to the moon and back six and a half times.

 XXX5FRY6C9DS

Tags: long island green homes, long island, green building, demolition waste, construction and demolition waste, waste, advanced restoration, advanced restoration corporation, environment, building deconstruction, building deconstruction long island, green construction, build green, sustainable practices, c & d waste

Building Deconstruction On Long Island

Posted on Thu, Feb 04, 2010 @ 09:15 PM

What Is Building Deconstruction?

Building deconstruction is the systematic dismantlement of building materials and building components, specifically for re-use, recycling, and waste management.  It differs from demolition where a site is cleared of its building materials by the most expedient means and a majority of the demolished materials are hauled to a landfill for disposal. 

Building deconstruction is also referred to as "construction in reverse" or "Last On, First Off (LOFO) Construction".  Deconstruction is new by name, but not by practice, as the recovery and reuse of materials in order to build new structures is as old as buildings themselves. Reuse of materials might be considered one of the "original" green building techniques, along with the use of local materials.

In the pre-industrial era, building material conservation was driven by the high intensity of the labor effort required to harvest and prepare them. Reuse of materials provided an economic advantage. In the mid-to-late 20th century, the emergence of machine-made and mass-produced materials, chemically complicated materials, and the relatively low cost of oil allowed this basic idea of "waste not, want not" to fall from usage in the creation of built environment. 

Buildings, like everything, have a life-cycle. Deconstruction focuses on giving the building materials within a building a new life once the building as a whole can no longer continue.

Building materials and components within old buildings may still be valuable, sometimes more valuable than at the time the building was constructed.  Deconstruction is a method of harvesting what is commonly considered "waste" and reclaiming it into useful building material.  In the process, Advanced Restoration Corp. seeks to recycle or reclaim for re-use a majority of the structure, save the property owner expensive debris hauling and disposal costs, and enable the donors to earn a significant tax deduction for their donations.

For More Information Please Visit Our Other Web Pages:

Deconstruction: The 1st Phase In Sustainable Building

Deconstructing Construction and Demolition (C & D) Waste

Long Island's Economic Benefits of Building Deconstruction

Long Island's Environmental Benefits of Building Deconstruction

Long Island's Social and Community Benefits

 

 

 

Tags: long island green homes, long island, green, green building, advanced restoration, advanced restoration corporation, environment, building deconstruction, building deconstruction long island, green construction, build green, sustainable practices

Ice Dams and Your Home

Posted on Fri, Jan 22, 2010 @ 10:19 AM

Whenever there is snow, you are likely to have troublesome ice dams to follow. Ice dams can cause major water damage and flooding to your home, which requires immediate attention.

 

ice dams


 

 

As winter advances through cycles of freezing and thawing, buildings and homes experience ice buildup and roof damage. In general, ice dams are formed when attic heat moves up to warm the roof and melts snow at or near the ridge. Snow melts, runs downward and hits the edge of the cold roof, resulting in re-freezing snow.  These cycles cause ice to accumulate and back up under shingles. Damage appears in the form of soaked insulation, stained, cracked and damaged sheet rock, damp, smelly, rotting wall cavities and stained, blistered and peeling paint.

Preventing Ice Dams
To prevent an ice dam, don't heat the roof, keep it cold. That way, the snow on the roof eventually dissipates without making large amounts of meltwater. The underside of the roof deck should not exceed 30 F. The best way to maintain low temperatures is by ensuring that there is adequate insulation and sealing gaps that let warm air pass into the attic from the house. The attic must also be ventilated, so that cold air is introduced into it and heated air escapes rapidly.  InsulationIncreased insulation in an attic will help to prevent ice dams. First, insulate the areas between the roof rafters. It is important to keep an air space between the roof deck and the insulation in order to prevent a condensation buildup that can delaminate the roof deck. Prior to insulating, install polystyrene rafter air channels, which are available at home centers.  If there's a hatchway into the attic, build a cover for it out of rigid poly-styrene insulation.

If the gable and ridge vents do not generate sufficient air movement to dissipate the heat, you will need a motorized vent at one end of the attic to exhaust the heat, and an adequately sized vent on the opposite end of the attic to draw in cold air from the outside.

Ice Dam Inspection
Check your home carefully when ice dams form. Investigate even when there doesn't appear to be a leak. Look at the underside of the roof sheathing and roof trim to make sure they haven't gotten wet. Check the insulation for dampness. And when leaks inside your home develop, be prepared. Water penetration often follows pathways difficult follow.  Don't just patch the roof leak. Make sure that the roof sheathing hasn't rotted or that other less obvious problems in your ceiling or walls haven't developed. Detail a comprehensive plan to fix the damage and more importantly, solve the problem.

Frozen Pipes?

frozen pipes

 

Tags: preventing frozen pipes, ny water damage company, restoration companies, flooding, nassau county restoration, demolition waste, winter storm, ice damage, cold winter, advanced restoration, restoration, emergency service, disrepair, flood damage, flood, home repair, moisture, ice storm

Why Hire a Property Damage/Disaster Restoration Company?

Posted on Tue, Jan 19, 2010 @ 12:01 PM
Fire & Water Damage Restoration 

fire, smoke, disaster,water damage
If your home or office has experienced fire or water damage, you may want to seek a professional that can help you repair and restore your building.

Natural disasters, such as floods and fires can leave commercial and residential buildings with mold and smoke damage. Both are major contributors to property loss and need to be taken care of in order to save the structural integrity of your house or building.

Water damage can either be immediate, such as flooding, or be more gradual, such as water spots on hardwood floors or even walls. However slow or fast water damage occurs, it is important to remove any carpet, dry the area and hire a professional for removal or extraction in case of mold. Restoration can include everything from inspection of the area to asses where the source is and how much damage has occurred, cleaning and sanitizing the area, and deodorize any smells. All this is done with special equipment.

If you have experienced fire damage that has left smoke stains, ceiling damage, or lots of soot, this too needs to be dealt with by a professional restoration company. Fire damage can be covered by fire insurance, so make sure to check if you can get any financial help to cover losses.

When damage has occurred to your home or office, whether in the basement or on the roof, you need to seek professional help to restore damage and save your property. Damage can easily spread, and if not handled properly can cause worse problems.

What is DKI?
Disaster Kleenup International, Inc.
is a network of the leading, independent property damage restoration contractors across North America. DKI member companies (see www.AdvancedRestoration.com in New York) provide full service to their customers: Emergency response, water damage mitigation, mold remediation, complete reconstruction and much more 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, returning damaged property to pre-loss condition fast and efficiently, delivering complete satisfaction to their consumer, insurance, and corporate customers.

Tags: disaster, property damage, fire restoration, ny water damage company, puffbacks, flooding, nassau county restoration, dki, burn hazard, fire prevention, smoke damage, christmas tree fire, advanced restoration, long island water damage, reconstruction, suffolk county restoration, emergency service, disrepair, disaster kleenup international, flood damage, smoke restoration

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