Property Damage & Disaster Restoration Blog: Long Island & New York City

The ReUse People (TRP), Long Island Building Deconstruction, and Advanced Restoration Corporation

Posted on Fri, Apr 16, 2010 @ 08:14 PM

Advanced Restoration Corporation is proud to partner with The Reuse People (TRP) on all our Building Deconstruction projects to make the Long Island Community the Leader in Building Deconstruction and Building Material Reuse in New York and throughout the country.

By partnering with us, The ReUse People are able to expand into the Long Island market to promote Building Deconstruction and the salvage and sale of reusable building materials while diverting construction and demolition (C&D) waste from our overburdened landfills.

These services are among the first steps in the green building process. Furthermore, tax-deductible donations of reusable materials to TRP, a nonprofit 501(c)3 corporation, provide a faster payback and better return-on-investment than any other product or service offered by the green building industry on Long Island.

How The ReUse People (TRP) Started

The ReUse People (TRP) started in April, 1993, with a drive for building materials to help the flood victims in Tijuana, Mexico. The drive, Project Valle Verde, was planned and coordinated with the mayors of Tijuana and San Diego, the San Diego Chamber of Commerce, the County Board of Supervisors, San Diego Gas and Electric Company, Waste Management, and the Building Industry Association.
 
On April 23 and 24, contractors, other private companies, public agencies and the citizens of San Diego donated over 400 tons of building materials valued at $1.2 million. Twenty-seven tractor trailers crossed the border carrying this material in an unprecedented demonstration of bi-national cooperation and assistance.
 
The success of Project Valle Verde demonstrated the need for used building materials and the impact of this need on our already overused and over committed landfills.
 
The ReUse People started as Building Materials Distributors in San Diego in 1993 and, due to a name conflict with an existing corporation, the name was soon changed to The ReUse People.

Who Benefits from Our Partnership On Long Island?

  • All of us through a better environment on Long Island
  • Low income families who cannot afford to buy new building materials
  • Building deconstruction can also lead to the creation of new jobs and businesses
  • Building owners by virtue of tax donations
  • Architects, builders and contractors through better service to their clients
  • Reduced unemployment strengthens the Long Island economy directly as well as indirectly in areas such as retail sales and housing

While we obtain reusable building materials from a variety of sources, our own deconstruction efforts and those of over 30 TRP-Certified Deconstruction Contractors throughout the country contribute over 90 percent of them.
 
Whether you are an architect, general building contractor, building owner, or government agency on Long Island we stand ready to provide you with a package of benefits including:

  • Environmentally sound demolition (We like the words building deconstruction)
  • Building materials salvage
  • Advanced Restoration Corporation's skilled building deconstruction technicians
  • Tax donations for all the materials donated to The ReUse People (TRP)
  • Lower overall project costs
  • The assurance that someone, somewhere reuses the salvageable building materials generated from your project(s) on Long Island

 

The ReUse People (TRP) President - Ted Reiff

 

Prior to founding The ReUse People (TRP) in 1995, Ted Reiff was managing partner with an investment banking firm that provided financial services to young technology companies. Now, in addition to guiding TRP's national expansion program, he consults with private companies and government bodies on a variety of demolition and waste diversion projects. A graduate of Ohio State University and a licensed demolition contractor, Ted served three terms as board president of I Love a Clean San Diego and is an advisor to Urban Habitat Chicago.

 

The ReUse People (TRP) Long Island Regional Manager - Mike Yurish

Mike holds a B.S. degree in environmental science from SUNY Purchase, New York, and has been an amateur deconstructionist for some 20 years. He serves on the board of directors of the ReCONNstruction Center in New Britain, Connecticut, and is a licensed realtor and appraisal trainee in New Jersey. A resident of Connecticut, Mike currently works as a senior print technician for a major printing company.  

Advanced Restoration Corporation - Eric Martin

 

Eric Martin has been in the family business for over 16 years.  He is certified by the Institute of Inspection, Cleaning, and Restoration Certification (IICRC) in Water Damage Mitigation and Advanced Structural Drying as well as holding his certification by the Restoration Industry Association (RIA) in Mold Remediation.  Eric has worked in New York City for 8 months after 9/11 cleaning up the building surrounding Ground Zero.  He also worked in New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina.    A Green Risk Professional from Vale Training Institute he is also a member of the Communications Committee from the U.S. Green Building Council's Long Island (USGBC-LI) chapter in charge of handling USGBC-LI's social media accounts.

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Advanced Restoration Corporation is proud to partner with The Reuse People (TRP) on all our Building Deconstruction projects to make the Long Island Community the Leader in Building Deconstruction and Building Material Reuse in New York and throughout the country.

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Building Deconstruction: Saving Long Island Landfills...One Building At A Time

Posted on Tue, Apr 13, 2010 @ 05:05 PM

 

What a beautiful weekend we just had on Long Island.  The Storms of March 2010 are behind us. Those of us in the insurance industry are slowing down a bit catching up on all our paperwork, riding the crest of the wave down to the end of its journey.  It felt like Spring for the first time for me this weekend.

On Sunday, I drove out to Sag Harbor, New York out on the East End of Long Island in the area most notably known as The Hamptons.  I went to inspect a home that was at the end of its use.  The new owners purchased the house, basically for the land, and plan to build a new one in its place.

But what do you do with the old house?  Just because the home is at the end of its life cycle, does not mean the building materials that make up the house are at the end of their usage. But since the advent of "mass production" the acceptable way to get rid of the old homes on Long Island (and the rest of the country) was to knock it down or "demo" with a bulldozer and dump all the construction and demolition (C&D) waste in the landfills. But there are other "greener" more cost-effective practices that can benefit the homeowner, the environment, and the Long Island community.

I inspected the house with a representative of The Reuse People (TRP). TRP is a Non-Profit Organization based in California with branches all over the United States. TRP keeps reusable and recyclable building materials out of overburdened landfills by promoting building deconstruction and channeling the building material back into the marketplace through donations and sales at its network of retail outlets. TRP works closely with local building deconstruction contractors to try and salvage up to 80 percent of the building materials (varies depending upon age and type of materials) during the building deconstruction process. These services are among the first steps in the green building process.

The house is a roughly 2,000SF ranch with an unfinished basement, attic, and small detached garage built in 1981. The previous owner had used it as a rental property and the house was not in the best of condition. The kitchen cabinets and wood floors were not salvageable due to water damage and type of materials. The wood floors today come in short pieces and are less valuable than longer older pieces. They are also very hard to piece back together. The single-pane wood windows and hallow core doors did not have much value either. Also the brick fireplace was relatively new and made with much stronger mortar than older masonry work. Because the mortar is much stronger, it is hard to clean the brick and reuse the material in a future construction project(s).

Building deconstruction is more labor intensive due to the care our deconstruction technicians must use when deconstructing the reusable building materials to save their value. We take the ultimate care in deconstructing, handling and packing the reusable building materials because too much breakage can disrupt the whole economics of the project and have one unhappy building owner or homeowner. A 2,000SF house takes five deconstruction technicians four weeks to deconstruct.

The representative of The Reuse People estimated the total value of usable building materials at roughly $20,000. That means the homeowner would get a tax deductible donation (percentage would depend on building owner or homeowner's income tax bracket) when he or she donated the reusable building materials to The Reuse People for distribution and resale in their network.

Below is a comparison of the cost of both Building Deconstruction vs. Demolition for this particular project in Sag Harbor, Long Island.

Process:

Deconstruction

Demolition

Cost:

$25,000

$15,000

Donations:

$20,000

 

Tax Deduction:

$5,000

 

Total Cost:

$20,000

$15,000

For this house, it is more cost effective to demolish the house than it is to perform any soft stripping or building deconstruction because there is very little value in the minimal reusable building materials we could have salvage from the home. In today's economy, like most of the Long Island green building industry, cost is still the driving factor over "the right thing to do".

Below is a list of building deconstruction projects that The Reuse People have worked on and the total dollar value of reusable building materials salvaged from each project.

City

Square Feet

Donation Value

Newport Beach, CA

5,523

$182,346

Napa, CA

3,342

$102,025

Oakland, CA

1,400

$74,144

Santa Barbara, CA

2,100

$57,000

Denver, CO

2,900

$125,566

Chicago, IL

2,200

$110,096

Chicago, IL

$2,800

$118,150

Bellevue, WA

3,800

$175,600

Kenosha, WI

2,250

$98,000

The list of soft stripping and building deconstruction project above that have overseen by The Reuse People throughout the United States prove that building deconstruction on Long Island can be a cost effective green building alternative to demolition if there is value in the reusable building materials.

It is Advanced Restoration Corporation's earnest desire to make the Long Island Community a Leader in Building Deconstruction and Building Material Reuse in New York and throughout the country. Please feel free to contact us if you have any questions regarding our Soft Stripping or Building Deconstruction Services on Long Island.

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Environmental Benefits of Building Deconstruction On Long Island

Posted on Wed, Feb 10, 2010 @ 08:31 PM

Buildings have a significant impact on the environment.  In the U.S., buildings represent more than 50 percent of the nation's wealth. New construction and renovation account for approximately $800 billion or approximately 13 percent of the Gross Domestic Product and employ over 10 million people.  The construction industry uses 40% of all extracted materials.  Thirty percent of all energy used is a result of the construction industry and the built environment.

By reducing waste generation, deconstruction also reduces climate gas emissions, and abates the need for new landfills and incinerators. Perhaps most importantly, it helps to steer the C&D industry away from traditional consumption and disposal patterns and towards sustainability and reuse. Reducing the industry's consumption of virgin materials helps preserve natural resources and protect the environment from the air, ground, and water pollution related to extraction, processing, and disposal of raw materials.

Each year the United States buries about 33 million tons of wood related construction and demolition debris in our landfills. As anaerobic microorganisms decompose this wood, it will release about 5 million tons of carbon equivalent in the form of methane gas.

This is equivalent to the yearly emissions of 3,736,000 passenger cars.

Producing new building materials from recycled, rather than virgin, materials consumes less energy. Consuming less energy means burning fewer fossil fuels, which in turn means producing fewer green house gases.

Every ton of wood that is reused avoids the creation of 60 pounds of green house gases that would have been created to harvest and mill new lumber.

The Environmental Protection Agency On Building Deconstruction

Building deconstruction is a "grave-to-cradle" program that helps take care of the enormous stock of buildings reaching the end of their useful lives while simultaneously reducing the pressure to mine or harvest natural resources for new construction, reducing the need for landfill space, and creating new jobs.

Construction activities consume 60% of the total raw materials used in the U. S. economy.

Estimates that 136 million tons of building-related C&D waste is generated annually, of which 92% is from renovation and demolition work.

Only 20% to 30% of C&D waste is being recycled.

Tags: environmental, demolition waste, construction and demolition waste, environmental benefits building deconstruction, advanced restoration corporation, building deconstruction, building deconstruction long island, build green, environmental benefits

Possible Long Island Economic Benefits of Building Deconstruction

Posted on Tue, Feb 09, 2010 @ 08:49 PM

The economic benefits of deconstruction are substantial.  One of the biggest challenges to "greening" businesses is overcoming the false perception that environmentally-sound business practices necessarily will increase costs and decrease profits. Building deconstruction is helping break that myth. 

Old buildings on Long Island are an untapped valuable resource.  When a building is no longer fit for use and has to come down, does this happen just as all of its parts and components wear out?  Most old buildings have some systems and materials with useful lives.  The trick is efficiently identifying the materials and getting them out of the building.  When redeveloping a Long Island property, it is difficult to see the old buildings as anything but obstacles. Also, it is important to consider whether their contents and/or components may actually be resources that have net value.

You can get a tax deduction.  The reusable waste from your project could be worth a significant tax write-off.  You can donate your salvaged building materials to numerous not-for-profit organizations on Long Island and receive a tax-deductible receipt to help offset the higher labor costs that building deconstruction requires (versus demolition).  Advanced Restoration Corp. provides all of our clients with a detailed photo-documented inventory of salvaged materials for tax purposes. 

Building deconstruction reduces overall project costs.  Buildings can be deconstructed more cheaply than they can be demolished.  Building deconstruction reduces the cost of waste disposal.  For every ton of material diverted from a landfill, there is one less ton of disposal costs. To the extent deconstructed materials can be incorporated into a new building or space on the same site, the savings are two-fold-reduced disposal costs and new material costs.

Tags: economic benefits, green, green building, advanced restoration corporation, building deconstruction, building deconstruction long island, economic benefits of building deconstruction, green construction, build green, sustainable practices, c & d waste, tax donation

Deconstructing Long Island's Construction & Demolition Waste

Posted on Fri, Feb 05, 2010 @ 12:57 PM

When buildings reach the end of their useful life, they are typically demolished and hauled to landfills.  Building implosions or ‘wrecking-ball' style demolitions are relatively inexpensive and offer a quick method of clearing sites for new structures. On the other hand, these methods create substantial amounts of waste. 

The demolition and renovation of buildings in the U.S. produces 124,670,000 tons of debris each year, according to the Deconstruction Institute. That's an awful lot when you consider that just one 2,000-square-foot wood-frame home has the potential to yield 6,000-board-feet of reusable lumber or about 85 percent of the wood framing.  That house, demolished and sent to a landfill, amounts to about 127 tons of trashed materials or about 10,000 cubic feet of debris.  This is equivalent to 33 mature trees, or the yearly output of 10 acres of planted pine (7 football fields).  Wood frame houses are good examples, since 95 percent of all houses are built that way.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency estimates that 270,000 residential units are demolished in the U.S annually.  Much of that demolition debris goes into landfills.  In this country, according the EPA, building debris (in total, not just from residential units) accounts for one-third of all solid waste, and an estimated 91 percent of that comes from renovation and demolition.  We can estimate that for every 3 square feet of deconstruction, enough lumber can be salvaged to build 1 square foot of new construction. At this rate, if deconstruction replaced residential demolition, the US could generate enough recovered wood to construct 120,000 new affordable homes each year.

Some states, including California and Massachusetts, are enacting bans, taking steps to divert up to 60% of the construction waste from landfills.  In Chicago, the city has ordinances which require almost half of the construction debris be diverted from landfills.  Thanks to some forward-thinking insurance companies who now offer a "green" policy, coverage for recycling and deconstruction costs are now a reality on some insurance policies.

Construction & Debris (C & D) Waste Facts

In 1978, there were approximately 20,000 landfills. By 1988, that number had dropped to 5,499. Currently the figure stands at 3,091. The EPA estimates that as of the 2008, only 1,234 landfills were available. 

Only 3 active landfills on Long Island as of 2009.

All landfills will eventually fail and leak leachate into ground and surface water. Plastics are not inert. State-of-the-art plastic (HDPE) landfill liners (1/10 inch or 100 mils thick) and plastic pipes allow chemicals and gases to pass through their membranes, become brittle, swell, and breakdown. 

"...82% of surveyed landfill cells had leaks while 41% had a leak area of more than 1 square feet," according to Leak Location Services, Inc. (LLSI) website (March 15, 2000).

All landfills could require remediation, but particularly landfills built in the last 60 years will require a thorough clean-up due to the disposal of highly toxic chemicals manufactured and sold since the 1940's.

The U.S. generated 143.5 million tons of building-related construction and demolition debris in 2008, but only 28% (40.2 million tons) was reused, recycled or sent to waste-to-energy facilities.

Consider that one year's debris is enough to build a wall about 30 feet high and 30 feet thick around the entire coast of the continental United States (4,993 miles).

How much do your building projects impact these numbers? Consider the following:

  • The average new construction project yields 3.9 pounds of waste per square foot of building area. Example: A 50,000-square-foot building = 97.5 tons of waste.
  • The average building demolition yields 155 pounds of waste per square foot. Example:A 50,000-square-foot building = 3,875 tons of waste.

According to the National Association of Home Builders, a typical 2,200 sq.ft. home requires 13,000 board feet of framing lumber.  If laid end to end, that framing lumber would stretch 2.5 miles.

If all the dimensional lumber used to build the 1.2 million new homes constructed in the United State each year were laid end to end, it would extend 3 million miles, the equivalent of going to the moon and back six and a half times.

 XXX5FRY6C9DS

Tags: long island green homes, long island, green building, demolition waste, construction and demolition waste, waste, advanced restoration, advanced restoration corporation, environment, building deconstruction, building deconstruction long island, green construction, build green, sustainable practices, c & d waste

Building Deconstruction On Long Island

Posted on Thu, Feb 04, 2010 @ 09:15 PM

What Is Building Deconstruction?

Building deconstruction is the systematic dismantlement of building materials and building components, specifically for re-use, recycling, and waste management.  It differs from demolition where a site is cleared of its building materials by the most expedient means and a majority of the demolished materials are hauled to a landfill for disposal. 

Building deconstruction is also referred to as "construction in reverse" or "Last On, First Off (LOFO) Construction".  Deconstruction is new by name, but not by practice, as the recovery and reuse of materials in order to build new structures is as old as buildings themselves. Reuse of materials might be considered one of the "original" green building techniques, along with the use of local materials.

In the pre-industrial era, building material conservation was driven by the high intensity of the labor effort required to harvest and prepare them. Reuse of materials provided an economic advantage. In the mid-to-late 20th century, the emergence of machine-made and mass-produced materials, chemically complicated materials, and the relatively low cost of oil allowed this basic idea of "waste not, want not" to fall from usage in the creation of built environment. 

Buildings, like everything, have a life-cycle. Deconstruction focuses on giving the building materials within a building a new life once the building as a whole can no longer continue.

Building materials and components within old buildings may still be valuable, sometimes more valuable than at the time the building was constructed.  Deconstruction is a method of harvesting what is commonly considered "waste" and reclaiming it into useful building material.  In the process, Advanced Restoration Corp. seeks to recycle or reclaim for re-use a majority of the structure, save the property owner expensive debris hauling and disposal costs, and enable the donors to earn a significant tax deduction for their donations.

For More Information Please Visit Our Other Web Pages:

Deconstruction: The 1st Phase In Sustainable Building

Deconstructing Construction and Demolition (C & D) Waste

Long Island's Economic Benefits of Building Deconstruction

Long Island's Environmental Benefits of Building Deconstruction

Long Island's Social and Community Benefits

 

 

 

Tags: long island green homes, long island, green, green building, advanced restoration, advanced restoration corporation, environment, building deconstruction, building deconstruction long island, green construction, build green, sustainable practices

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