Property Damage & Disaster Restoration Blog: Long Island & New York City

2011 Atlantic Hurricane Season

Posted on Fri, Apr 01, 2011 @ 09:58 AM

2011 atlantic hurricane season

AccuWeather.com Hurricane Center meteorologists, led by Meteorologist and Hurricane Forecaster Paul Pastelok, are predicting an active season for 2011 with more impact on the U.S. coastline than last year.

The team is forecasting a total of 15 named tropical storms, eight of which will attain hurricane status and three of which will attain major hurricane status (Category 3 or higher).

In a normal year, there are 10 tropical storms, six of which become hurricanes and two of which become major hurricanes, or attain winds that exceed 110 mph.

2010's historic season had a total of 19 named storms and ranks as the third most active season on record, but there was little impact on the United States coastline. Twelve of these storms became hurricanes, five of which were major hurricanes. Two names from the 2010 season were retired on March 16.

"It looks like we're going to have more impact on the mainland of the U.S. coming up this year compared to last year," Pastelok said. "We had a lot of storms last year, but not a lot of impact [on the U.S.]."

In order to project the number of storms and impacts, the team looks at past years that have similar weather variables and patterns that closely resemble the most recent fall, winter and early spring months.

This Season's Concern Areas

As with most Atlantic hurricane seasons, the areas where storms are most likely to make landfall shift as the season progresses.

This year, the early season threat area will be the western Gulf of Mexico and the southern portion of the Caribbean. Within this zone, the higher concern for landfalls will be along the Texas and Louisiana coastlines.

As for the mid-to-late season zones, the eastern Gulf and Caribbean will be the focus. The higher concern areas will be the Florida Peninsula to the Carolinas.

"What we see is there is a clustering of storm impacts over the southeastern US, and that's the reason why we earmarked this as a concern area," said Kottlowski.

Another mid-to-late season concern for landfalls will be northern New England and the Canadian Maritimes.

"We feel that this season, there will be a higher potential for impacts across the southern part of the Basin into the Gulf of Mexico during the first part of the season," Pastelok stated. "This higher potential for impacts shift farther north into the southeast U.S. during the latter half of the season."

Hurricane season officially begins June 1 and ends Nov. 30.

For all the latest tropical information, be sure to check the AccuWeather.com Hurricane Center for the most up-to-date videos, information and storm tracks.

Article Source: Accuweather.com
By Gina Cherundolo, AccuWeather.com

Tags: disaster, floods, flooding, long island hurricane season, hurricane damage long island, property damage long island, 2011 hurricane season, long island water damage, disaster restoration, long island huricane, catastrophe, water removal long island, hurricane, long island after the storms, accuweather forecast

President Declares Major Disaster For New York

Posted on Mon, Feb 21, 2011 @ 10:57 AM

snow storm, fema disaster declaration,

WASHINGTON -- The U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) today announced that federal disaster aid has been made available to New York to supplement state and local recovery efforts in the area struck by a severe winter storm and snowstorm during the period of December 26-27, 2010.

Federal funding is available to state and eligible local governments and certain private nonprofit organizations on a cost-sharing basis for emergency work and the repair or replacement of facilities damaged by the severe winter storm and snowstorm in Nassau and Suffolk counties.

In addition, assistance is available to the state and eligible local governments in Nassau, Rensselaer, and Richmond counties on a cost-sharing basis for emergency protective measures, including snow assistance, for a continuous 48-hour period during or proximate to the incident period.

Federal funding is also available on a cost-sharing basis for hazard mitigation measures statewide.

John Long has been named as the Federal Coordinating Officer for Federal recovery operations in the affected area.  Long said additional designations may be made at a later date if requested by the state and warranted by the results of further damage assessments.

 

Assistance for State and Eligible Local Governments Can Include as Required:

  • Payment of not less than 75 percent of the eligible costs for repairing or replacing damaged public facilities, such as roads, bridges, utilities, buildings, schools, recreational areas and similar publicly owned property, as well as certain private non-profit organizations engaged in community service activities. (Source: FEMA funded, state administered.)
  • Payment of not less than 75 percent of the eligible costs for removing debris from public areas and for emergency measures taken to save lives and protect property and public health.  Emergency protective measures assistance is available to the state and eligible local governments on a cost-sharing basis for emergency protective measures, including snow assistance, for a continuous 48-hour period during or proximate to the incident period.  (Source: FEMA funded, state administered.). 
  • Payment of not more than 75 percent of the approved costs for hazard mitigation projects undertaken by state and local governments to prevent or reduce long-term risk to life and property from natural or technological disasters.  (Source: FEMA funded, state administered.)

For more information, visit FEMA.

Tags: disaster, cold winter, FEMA, snow storm, new york, catastrophe, long island after the storms, nor'easter

Hurricane Alerts: Watch vs. Warning...Know the Difference

Posted on Tue, Aug 31, 2010 @ 11:37 AM

hurricane earl

Hurricane Earl, the second major hurricane of 2010, is moving away from the Northern Leeward Islands.  Residents along the U.S. East Coast should follow Earl closely to see what impacts the hurricane will bring Thursday and Friday.  Long Island may be impacted by Earl and current weather conditions call for a 30-40% chance that Suffolk County will face a Tropical Storm come this Friday, September 3rd. 

What is the differnece between Watches and Warnings? 

  • TROPICAL STORM WATCH: An announcement that tropical storm conditions (sustained winds of 39 to 73 mph) are
possible within the specified coastal area within 48 hours.
  • TROPICAL STORM WARNING: An announcement that tropical storm conditions (sustained winds of 39 to 73 mph) are expected somewhere within the specified coastal area within 36 hours.
  • HURRICANE WATCH: An announcement that hurricane conditions (sustained winds of 74 mph or higher) are possible within the specified coastal area. Because hurricane preparedness activities become difficult once winds reach tropical storm force, the hurricane watch is issued 48 hours in advance of the anticipated onset of tropical-storm-force winds.
  • HURRICANE WARNING: An announcement that hurricane conditions (sustained winds of 74 mph or higher) are expected somewhere within the specified coastal area. Because hurricane preparedness activities become difficult once winds reach tropical storm force, the hurricane warning is issued 36 hours in advance of the anticipated onset of tropical-storm-force winds.
  • For more information on hurricanes and emergency preparedness, please click here.

     

    Tags: disaster, hurricane tips, water damage long island, earl, hurricane damage long island, advanced restoration corporation, 2010 Hurricane Season, hurricanes long island, hurricane long island, hurricane damage, hurricane damage cleanup, catastrophe, storm, hurricane, storm 2010, water removal, hurricane earl hits long island, emergency preparedness

    Bayville Benefits from FEMA's Mitigation Projects

    Posted on Wed, Aug 04, 2010 @ 08:23 AM

    Albany, N.Y. -- Bayville, located on the northernmost tip of Nassau County, escaped storm damage from the March nor’easter because of Federal Emergency Management Agency’s (FEMA) Hazard Mitigation Grant Program (HMGP) projects.  These were undertaken 12 years ago when a storm drainage system, leaching pits and a retaining wall project were constructed.  Hazard mitigation grants, which are administered by New York State, fund projects designed to reduce the likelihood of damage from floods and severe weather.

    The north side of Bayville Avenue along the coastal shoreline of Long Island Sound had a history of erosion that if left unchecked could have caused a breach or failure of Bayville Avenue, and eliminated the only road access into the Village of Centre Island.

    The grant funded the installation of an 800-foot retaining wall along the shoreline, which stabilized the area and ensured that about 450 residents of the Village of Centre Island would have access to critical facilities and emergency services during severe storms.

    HMGP also funded a drainage project in an area of the village bounded on the north by Long Island Sound and on the south by Oyster Bay Harbor, where severe flooding recurred after significant rainfall and coastal storm events.  The flood waters, combined with higher than usual tides, caused Long Island Sound to swell and back up along the village’s north shore as there was no outlet for the tidal flood water.

    To combat this problem, street drainage structures, leaching pools, overflow and outfall piping equipped with tidal check valves, were installed. These enhancements permitted the water to drain into Oyster Bay. Nick Campagnola, a village resident, stated that “the drainage system definitely helped improve the conditions after a storm” he added, “without the system we would really be in trouble.”

    “The benefit this work has provided to residents is significant,” said Douglas G. Watson, mayor of Bayville. “The drainage system was designed to drain water from low-lying streets in the project area, and succeeded in preventing flooding from severe rain events such as last March’s nor’easter.  The system left the streets safely free of standing water in a short time. We are very happy with the way it has worked out.”

    “These enhancements have withstood severe weather conditions,”  Watson added.

    Source: FEMA

    Tags: disaster, groundwater, FEMA, flood damage, flood, catastrophe

    Were You Impacted by the Heavy Winds on Long Island?

    Posted on Mon, May 10, 2010 @ 11:18 AM

     

    Strong winds hit the New York area this weekend, causing property damage to some homes and businesses throughout parts of Long Island.

    Falling trees and limbs cause hundreds of millions of dollars of damage each year, as well as personal injuries and deaths. Windstorms and ice storms are leading causes of such damage and injuries.

    Tree-related damage is usually apparent. Limbs crashing through a roof or onto automobiles or power lines are hard to miss. Sometimes the damage is so severe that entire homes are destroyed. This is especially likely to happen when large trees are torn out of the ground and topple onto a house, crashing through the structure or knocking it off its foundation.

    Some trees are also notorious for aggressively sending out roots that can damage the foundation of a house, buckle sidewalks or plug up septic systems, forcing homeowners to spend thousands of dollars for repairs.

    The kinds of trees in a yard, their proximity to a house and the care they receive all affect safety and the potential for damage or personal injury.

    Some potential problems are easy to spot. These include:

    -Cracks in the trunk or major limbs.
    -Hollow and decayed trees.
    -Trees that look one-sided or lean significantly.
    -Branches hanging over the house near the roof.
    -Limbs in contact with power lines.
    -Mushrooms growing from the bark, indicating a decayed or weakened stem.
    -V-shaped forks rather than U-shaped ones. V-shaped are more likely to split.
    -Crossing branches that rub or interfere with one other.

    Tree care professionals, including arborists, can also examine trees for more subtle signs of trouble and take care of any problems, such as the need to cut down a tree or prune limbs that might be too big, too high, or too dangerous for a homeowner to take down. Arborists can also help save trees and limbs.

    Homeowners, though, represent the first line of defense. Regularly examine trees and check for damage or other trouble signs and take corrective action if necessary, either on your own or with the help of an expert.

    Proper pruning
    Good pruning can prevent many problems. Prompt removal of diseased, damaged or dead plant parts helps limit the spread of harmful insects and disease, as well as reduce the possibility of future storm damage. Pruning can also have other benefits. For instance, pruning a dense canopy reduces its mass while permitting better air circulation and sunlight penetration. Pruning also helps provide proper shape and improves the health and vigor of the plant.  Do not over prune, a practice called hat racking, as this will significantly weaken a tree.


    Experts offer these pruning tips:

    • Check local tree regulations prior to pruning or tree removal.
    • Avoid pruning branches flush to the trunk. Doing so removes not only the limb but some of the trunk wood, opening the plant to possible decay or insect damage.
    • Begin by making a cut partway through the bottom of any limb to be trimmed, a few inches from the trunk. Then cut through the limb just above the first cut. This ensures that when the limb falls, it will not tear off a long strip of bark on the way down.
    • Finish by cutting off the few inches sticking out from the trunk. Be sure to leave the "branch collar," the swollen area of trunk tissue that forms around the base of a branch. Leaving the branch collar protects the main trunk from damage.


    After a Storm
    The type of care you give after a storm should depend on a tree's age, the extent and type of damage. 

    To care for storm damaged trees:

    • Plan ahead before deciding what to do with fallen trees. 
    • In general, it is best to reset only smaller trees, since large trees will be weakened and may fall again.
    • Decide what to do with tree stumps. 
    • If you are going to leave them, cut them off flush with the ground. 
    • If you plan to remove them, leave four feet of stump standing. 
    • Removal will be cheaper and easier if stumps can be pulled out instead of dug out.
    • Cut off broken or torn limbs to avoid unnecessary bark stripping.
    • When straightened, uprooted trees will require bracing for a long time. 
    • Before you reset a tree, cut, smooth and paint all jagged and irregular root breaks. 
    • Water the tree well and fertilize. 
    • Do not remove guy wires or braces for two years.
    • After repairing trees, continue to care for them.  Check soil moisture regularly.  
    • Prune a damaged tree just enough to balance the loss of roots. 
    • Cut out broken, diseased and malformed branches to give the tree a desirable shape.

    If you have property damage to your home or business and need assistance, please contact Advanced Restoration's staff at (800) 693-6263. Advanced Restoration Corporation serves Nassau and Suffolk County, and the New York Metro area.  

    Tags: wind damage, nassau county restoration, disaster kleenup, advanced restoration corporation, emergency service, disaster restoration, home repair, catastrophe

    Property Damage: Long Island After the Storms of March, 2010

    Posted on Sun, Apr 11, 2010 @ 04:04 PM

    Long Island, New York City and the rest of New York and the Northeast was devastated from the recent flooding caused by torrential rain, wind, and storm damage.  A majority of flooded basements across Long Island were caused by ground water due to over-saturation of the earth.  Insurance companies do not cover groundwater under their policies. 

    You need to have a separate Flood Insurance if you fall into the Flood Coverage Area.  And that only covers property damage to structures that are above grade.  Basements are not above grade so they would be excluded from those policies. 

    That means there were many homeowners throughout Long Island and New York City that had flooded basements that were not covered by their insurance policy.   

    For some people this is too much.  There are a lot of people in hardship right now across Long Island due to the economic times we live in.  If they did not hire a professional restoration company or water damage cleanup company like Advanced Restoration Corporation, a DKI Member Company, they had to extract / remove the water themselves or rely on friends and/or family to help them out.

    But just because the water is removed or extracted, that does not mean the job is over.  The wet porous building materials need to be removed, or dried along with the structural wood members and concrete so their moisture content levels are reduced to regional acceptable standards.  

    And some people will just ignore the water in the basement or the leaky roof, thinking it will dry out on its own.  And technically, everything that gets wet will eventually dry, if it can.  And not every water intrusion causes severe mold contamination.  It all depends on the size of the area and the lenght of time the area has been wet without receiving any attention.

    At this  point you should ask yourself this:

    How long will it take?  Can the wet building materials dry out before mold contamination can occur (usually 48-72 hours in optimum conditions)? 

    If wet building materials are not addressed in a timely fashion then the problem magnifies exponentially over time until it becomes a much bigger and more expensive issue. 

    Please do not hesitate to Contact Us for any assistance or guidance if you have or even think you have a mold issue in the Long Island and New York City areas.  We would be more than happy to speak with you.


     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Mold Removal / Mold Remediation Services Long Island & New York City

    by

    Advanced Restoration Corporation

    a DKI Member Company

     
     
     
    Long Island Building Demolition
     
    by
     
    Advanced Restoration Corporation
     
    a DKI Member Company

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    "A Brief Guide to Mold, Moisture, and Your Home"

    Posted on Wed, Mar 31, 2010 @ 10:00 AM

    The recent storms that hit the Northeast have caused major flooding and property damage to homes and businesses. The aftermath of the storms have property owners dealing with mold and moisture issues. 

    Mold Basics...

    The key to mold control is moisture control.
    If mold is a problem is in your home, you should clean up the mold promptly and fix the water problem. It is important to dry water-damaged areas within 24-48 hours to prevent mold growth. 

      

    Why is mold growing in my home?

    Molds are part of the natural environment.  Outdoors, molds play a part in nature by breaking down dead organic matter such as fallen leaves and dead trees, but indoors, mold growth should be avoided.  Molds reproduce by means of tiny spores; the spores are invisible to the naked eye and float through outdoor and indoor air.  Mold may begin growing indoors when mold spores land on surfaces that are wet.  There are many types of mold, and none of them will grow without water or moisture.

    Can mold cause health problems?

    Molds are usually not a problem indoors, unless mold spores land on a wet or damp spot and begin growing.  Molds have the potential to cause health problems. Molds produce allergens (substances that can cause allergic reactions), irritants, and in some cases, potentially toxic substances (mycotoxins).  Inhaling or touching mold or mold spores may cause allergic reactions in sensitive individuals.  Allergic responses include hay fever-type symptoms, such as sneezing, runny nose, red eyes, and skin rash (dermatitis). Allergic reactions to mold are common.  They can be immediate or delayed.  Molds can also cause asthma attacks in people with asthma who are allergic to mold. In addition, mold exposure can irritate the eyes, skin, nose, throat, and lungs of both mold-allergic and non-allergic people.  Symptoms other than the allergic and irritant types are not commonly reported as a result of inhaling mold.  Research on mold and health effects is ongoing.  This brochure provides a brief overview; it does not describe all potential health effects related to mold exposure. For more detailed information consult a health professional.  You may also wish to consult your state or local health department.

    How do I get rid of mold?

    It is impossible to get rid of all mold and mold spores indoors; some mold spores will be found floating through the air and in house dust.  The mold spores will not grow if moisture is not present.  Indoor mold growth can and should be prevented or controlled by controlling moisture indoors.  If there is mold growth in your home, you must clean up the mold and fix the water problem.  If you clean up the mold, but don't fix the water problem, then, most likely, the mold problem will come back.

     

    Mold Tips: 

    Fix plumbing leaks and other water problems as soon as possible.  Dry all items completely.

    Scrub mold off hard surfaces with detergent and water, and dry completely.

    Absorbent or porous materials, such as ceiling tiles and carpet, may have to be thrown away if they become moldy.  Mold can grow on or fill in the empty spaces and crevices of porous materials, so the mold may be difficult or impossible to remove completely.

    Avoid exposing yourself or others to mold.

    Do not paint or caulk moldy surfaces.  Clean up the mold and dry the surfaces before painting.  Paint applied over moldy surfaces is likely to peel.

    If you are unsure about how to clean an item, or if the item is expensive or of sentimental value, you may wish to consult a specialist.  Specialists in furniture repair, restoration, painting, art restoration and conservation, carpet and rug cleaning, water damage, and fire or water restoration are commonly listed in phone books.  Be sure to ask for and check references.  Look for specialists who are affiliated with professional organizations. For more information on mold, visit the EPA website.

    Source: Environmental Protection Agency

     

     

    Tags: disaster, water extraction long island, ny water damage company, structural drying, flooding, flood long island, mold, groundwater, black mold, advanced restoration, advanced restoration corporation, mold remediation, homeowner tips, flood damage, flood, storm damage, catastrophe, nor'easter

    What To Do After a Loss

    Posted on Thu, Mar 18, 2010 @ 08:32 AM

    Heavy rains and winds pummeled the New York Metro area this past weekend, causing major damage to many homes and businesses. If you experienced property damage, you need to know what to do after a loss. 

    If you suffer a loss, the first thing to do is to notify your insurance company or its agent. You can do this by telephone, although it is a good idea to follow up with written notification. Remember, if you give the notice to your broker, rather than directly to the insurance company, you still have a responsibility to make sure that the insurance company receives notice of your claim.

    It is also important to notify your insurance company promptly after any incident takes place that might result in a claim at some later date, even though no claim was made at the time the event occurred.

    For example, if your dog bites a neighbor or a guest falls on your property, it should be reported to the insurance company even though you don't know whether any claim is actually going to be made against you. Your failure to notify the company promptly might allow it to deny coverage in the event a claim if filed against you at a later date.

    It is also important to protect your property against further damages. For example, if the windows are broken, have them boarded up to protect against further vandalism or burglary. The cost of this type of protection is covered by, and would be reimbursed by your insurance company.

    However, no permanent repairs should be made until your company or its representative has inspected the property. The company has the right to inspect the property in its damaged state, and can refuse to pay you for any damage that is repaired before inspection.

    An adjuster will be sent from your insurance company to examine the damage and give you an estimate of the cost of repairs or replacement. You should also get an estimate from your own contractor to compare with the insurance company's estimate. Your contractor will probably charge a fee for this service but might credit that fee to your bill if you hire that contractor to repair and/or replace your property.

    If you need assistance, your agent, broker or insurance company sales representative should help you fill out the claim form and help gather the materials you need to substantiate your loss.

    In the event you are unfortunate enough to experience a major loss such as a fire or severe windstorm which has badly damaged or destroyed your home, and you are not in a position to negotiate a settlement with your company, you may want to consult an attorney or call a licensed public adjuster to act on your behalf with your insurance company.

    Public adjusters are licensed by the Insurance Department. They represent you and not the insurance company. They will help you in taking inventory of your loss, securing your home from vandalism, contacting your insurance company, advising you on the extent of your coverage and help you secure the services needed to repair or rebuild you home. They will negotiate on your behalf with the adjuster from the insurance company.

    A public adjuster may not charge a fee more than 12.5% of the recovery amount and must get a signed compensation agreement from you in which the amount of compensation is clearly stated. Such agreement may be cancelled up to midnight of the third business day after the date on which you have signed the compensation agreement. In addition, public adjusters may not solicit your business between the hours of 6 p.m. and 8 a.m.

    Another alternative to consider when an agreement cannot be reached between you and your insurance company is the appraisal process. Every homeowner, tenant, cooperative apartment and condominium policy issued in New York contains a provision whereby you and your company select a competent and disinterested appraiser. The two appraisers, in turn, select an umpire. Each appraiser must evaluate the loss and determine the value of each item. Any disagreements between the appraisers regarding the value of any items are submitted to, and settled by the umpire. The costs of this process are paid by the policyholder and the insurance company.

    Source:  NY State Insurance Department

    Tags: disaster, wind damage, emergency response, water extraction long island, property damage, ny water damage company, water damage, nassau county restoration, flood long island, mold, advanced restoration, long island water damage, flood damage, flood, home repair, moisture, storm damage, catastrophe, water removal long island

    Catastrophe Experts Call for Quick Action on Catastrophe Protection

    Posted on Wed, Mar 10, 2010 @ 04:12 PM

    Former FEMA Director: The status quo is not acceptable

    WASHINGTON, March 10 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- James Lee Witt, the former Director of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and the current co-chair of ProtectingAmerica.org today urged a subcommittee to the House Financial Services Committee to move quickly to enact legislation that would help American families and communities be better prepared for and protected from the devastation caused by massive natural catastrophes such as earthquakes and hurricanes.

    "A catastrophic event, whether an earthquake striking one of our great American cities, or a massive hurricane making landfall near any of the metropolitan areas from New York to Houston, would cause such enormous damage that our economy would be stunned, private resources quickly depleted, and an immediate federal bailout of hundreds of billions of dollars could potentially be required," Mr. Witt stated.  

    "The American public has lost its appetite for bailouts.  Clearly the nation, our families and our communities would be better served by a program that uses private insurer dollars to pre-fund coverage for the eventuality of the next massive hurricane or devastating earthquake," Witt said. "There is no place in the country that is immune from catastrophic natural events, and the stakes are higher than ever.  Major cities along the coasts, and throughout the West and Midwest, are threatened by devastating earthquakes or hurricanes.  The human, physical and economic toll that such events would take would be unfathomable," he said.

    "To put it simply, the status quo is not acceptable.  There is an urgent need for a comprehensive and integrated program that strengthens America's financial infrastructure, improves mitigation and readiness to prepare and protect our families and communities before and during catastrophe, and creates a privately-funded backstop that assures that resources will be available to rebuild, repair and recover as quickly as possible," Witt said.

    Witt testified before the House of Representatives Committee on Financial Services Subcommittee on Housing and Community Opportunity and Subcommittee on Capital Markets, Insurance, and Government Sponsored Enterprises in support of HR 2555, the Homeowners' Defense Act, a bill sponsored by Rep. Ron Klein (D-FL) and more than 70 cosponsors from across the nation.

    The bill would provide more protection at lower cost for consumers and provide additional capacity and stability to the market.

    The bill would also mandate and help finance enhanced mitigation and prevention through better land use planning, establishment and enforcement of stronger building codes and better education training and equipment for first responders.  

    An earlier version of the Homeowners' Defense Act passed the House of Representatives in the last session of Congress by a bipartisan margin of 258-155.

    ProtectingAmerica.org is a non-profit organization with over 300 members including the American Red Cross, the International Association of Fire Chiefs, and other emergency responders, emergency management officials, police organizations, Allstate and State Farm Insurance, and large and small businesses.  The organization has more than 20,000 individual members.

    ProtectingAmerica.org is co-chaired by James Lee Witt, former director of the Federal Emergency Management Agency and Admiral James M. Loy, former deputy secretary of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and former commandant of the U.S. Coast Guard.  

    A Nation Exposed

    • Risk experts and modelers suggest that 57 percent of the American public resides in areas that are prone to earthquakes, hurricanes or other disasters.  
    • Twenty states, including Hawaii and every state that borders the Atlantic Ocean and Gulf of Mexico, face the threat of hurricanes every year.
    • The largest earthquake to ever rock the continental U.S. emanated from New Madrid, Missouri in 1811 and affected an area that stretched from Mississippi to Michigan, from Pennsylvania to Nebraska.
    • Eight out of the 11 most costly U.S. natural catastrophes have occurred since 2001.
    • Since 1900, 11 hurricanes have made direct hits on New England; six of them on the New York coastline.  The "Long Island Express," a massive hurricane that in 1938 made landfall in Long Island and raced through Connecticut, Rhode Island and Massachusetts, killed 700 people and left 63,000 people homeless.  If the same storm struck today, damages would exceed $100 billion according to risk modelers.

    About ProtectingAmerica.org

    ProtectingAmerica.org is a non-profit organization consisting of emergency management officials, first responders, disaster relief experts, insurers and others.  Its members include the American Red Cross and more than 300 other organizations and businesses.

    At the core of ProtectingAmerica.org's mission is the establishment of a comprehensive, integrated national catastrophe management solution that will better prepare and protect American families, communities, consumers and the American economy from catastrophe.   

    ProtectingAmerica.org is working to increase public awareness and enhance consumer education; advocate for better coordination with local, state and federal mitigation and recovery efforts, and strengthen emergency response and financial mechanisms to rebuild after a major catastrophe.

    The organization supports comprehensive federal legislation that would establish a privately financed national catastrophe fund that would serve as a backstop to state catastrophe funds.  The funds' private deposits and the majority of its earnings could only be used to cover replacement and rebuilding costs following major catastrophic events.  A portion of the funds' earnings would be dedicated to increase public and consumer education, strengthen first responders, and enhance building codes and their enforcement.

     

    SOURCE ProtectingAmerica.org

    Tags: emergency response, property damage, ny water damage company, nassau county restoration, dki, environmental, first responder, restoration, suffolk county restoration, home repair, catastrophe, hurricane, mitigation, ny, earthquake

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