Property Damage & Disaster Restoration Blog: Long Island & New York City

Sycorp Calc: Apps to Help the Insurance Adjuster

Posted on Tue, Nov 26, 2013 @ 12:36 PM
Sycorp Calculater Android iPhone Apps Help Insurance Adjuster Long Island New York City Advanced Restoration Property Damage Disaster Restoration

Sycorp Calculater For Android & iPhones

The Sycorp Calc app provides quick and easy access to a number of calculations used in Restoration, Construction, HVAC and Indoor Air Quality industries. Easy to use, quick access for use on job sites. Great for water technicians, supervisors, and insurance adjusters. Based on IICRC formulas.

Instant calculations and optimized screens mean fast calculations.

 

Calculations include: 

  • Water Damage Restoration - dehumidifiers and air movers needed on a job based on Class of Loss and size of area. Also how many gallons of water in a given area.
  • Psychrometric calculations: Calculate Grains per pound (GPP) specific humidity, dew point, grain depression
  • Heating/Cooling: how many BTU's needed to heat or cool an area to a specific temperature
  • Indoor Air Quality: How many HEPA air units needed for specific Air Changes per Hour (ACH)
  • Power: how many kW are needed for equipment and cost to power. Also power required for given amount/type of equipment
  • Includes Manufacturer specs on latest models of dehumidifiers and HEPA Air Filter/Negative Air Machines
  • Also includes Definitions for common terms and acronyms.
  • Pro version also available with additional features such as multi room input, air movers by Linear feet, Class 4 calculations, email info, and more.

 

Sycorp Calc Android Google Play Advanced Restoration Insurance Adjuster Apps        

sycorp calc insurance adjuster apps disaster restoration property damage

Tags: iicrc, long island, water damage, new york, restoration, disaster restoration, insurance adjuster

Disaster Kleanup International Names New Director of Marketing

Posted on Wed, Jul 25, 2012 @ 09:28 AM

disaster kleenup international,dki,disaster,disasters,mary smith,director of marketing,disaster restoration

                                           DKI: North America's Largest Disaster Restoration Organization

                                                             DKI Names Mary Smith as Director of Marketing 

Mary Smith is a marketing communications veteran with twenty years of experience in various industries including the fitness, wellness, and entertainment fields. She is well versed in marketing, public relations, event management, advertising, promotional products, and branding.

Previous to this role Smith held the position of Director of Marketing for Nautilus, the fitness manufacturing icon. She was responsible for creating a domestic and international marketing program and creative strategy for the company. She also managed all trade shows and special projects.

"We are very excited to have Mary join the DKI team. Her extensive marketing communications experience will be a perfect fit for DKI's direction and business needs. It is my feeling that Mary will very quickly become an asset to our growing leadership team," said Dan Cassara, DKI President and CEO.

Smith earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Journalism and Mass Communication from the University of Iowa and received her Master of Science degree in Advertising from the University of Illinois.

Smith will be based in the company's National Headquarters in Wood Dale, Illinois.

About DKI

Disaster Kleenup International (DKI), LLC, headquartered in suburban Chicago, is the largest disaster restoration contracting organization in North America. DKI Member Companies provide full service restoration to their customers: emergency response, water damage mitigation, fire and contents cleaning, mold remediation, complete reconstruction and much more, 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. DKI returns damaged property to its pre-loss condition quickly and efficiently, delivering complete satisfaction to our consumer, insurance, and corporate customers. For more information about Disaster Kleenup International, LLC, visit our website at www.disasterkleenup.com or contact Mary Smith at (630) 350-3000.

Tags: mary smith, property damage, dki, restoration, disaster kleenup international, disaster restoration, disasters

2011 Atlantic Hurricane Season

Posted on Fri, Apr 01, 2011 @ 09:58 AM

2011 atlantic hurricane season

AccuWeather.com Hurricane Center meteorologists, led by Meteorologist and Hurricane Forecaster Paul Pastelok, are predicting an active season for 2011 with more impact on the U.S. coastline than last year.

The team is forecasting a total of 15 named tropical storms, eight of which will attain hurricane status and three of which will attain major hurricane status (Category 3 or higher).

In a normal year, there are 10 tropical storms, six of which become hurricanes and two of which become major hurricanes, or attain winds that exceed 110 mph.

2010's historic season had a total of 19 named storms and ranks as the third most active season on record, but there was little impact on the United States coastline. Twelve of these storms became hurricanes, five of which were major hurricanes. Two names from the 2010 season were retired on March 16.

"It looks like we're going to have more impact on the mainland of the U.S. coming up this year compared to last year," Pastelok said. "We had a lot of storms last year, but not a lot of impact [on the U.S.]."

In order to project the number of storms and impacts, the team looks at past years that have similar weather variables and patterns that closely resemble the most recent fall, winter and early spring months.

This Season's Concern Areas

As with most Atlantic hurricane seasons, the areas where storms are most likely to make landfall shift as the season progresses.

This year, the early season threat area will be the western Gulf of Mexico and the southern portion of the Caribbean. Within this zone, the higher concern for landfalls will be along the Texas and Louisiana coastlines.

As for the mid-to-late season zones, the eastern Gulf and Caribbean will be the focus. The higher concern areas will be the Florida Peninsula to the Carolinas.

"What we see is there is a clustering of storm impacts over the southeastern US, and that's the reason why we earmarked this as a concern area," said Kottlowski.

Another mid-to-late season concern for landfalls will be northern New England and the Canadian Maritimes.

"We feel that this season, there will be a higher potential for impacts across the southern part of the Basin into the Gulf of Mexico during the first part of the season," Pastelok stated. "This higher potential for impacts shift farther north into the southeast U.S. during the latter half of the season."

Hurricane season officially begins June 1 and ends Nov. 30.

For all the latest tropical information, be sure to check the AccuWeather.com Hurricane Center for the most up-to-date videos, information and storm tracks.

Article Source: Accuweather.com
By Gina Cherundolo, AccuWeather.com

Tags: disaster, floods, flooding, long island hurricane season, hurricane damage long island, property damage long island, 2011 hurricane season, long island water damage, disaster restoration, long island huricane, catastrophe, water removal long island, hurricane, long island after the storms, accuweather forecast

A Consumer Guide to Insurance for Natural Disasters

Posted on Thu, Dec 30, 2010 @ 10:59 AM

describe the image

Introduction
Natural disasters (including floods, nor'easters, etc.) affect the lives of many people in the United States every year.The hazardous effects can be local, impacting a neighborhood or community; or very large, affecting an entire city or county. People who understand disasters and know what to do before and after a disaster can significantly reduce the time and cost to return to normalcy. The purpose of this information is to provide an understanding of the types of natural disasters and the insurance available to cover the losses resulting from them.
 
Insurance for Your Residence
Depending on your type of dwelling, you will need to consider your insurance options to determine the most appropriate coverage. It makes good sense to purchase the type and amount of coverage that is adequate to protect your home and your family.

Owning a Home – There are various types of policies available to homeowners. In general, the homeowners policy combines property coverage with liability coverage. Dwelling policies only provide property coverage.

Rental – This policy covers the personal property owned by renters. It can also cover liabilities arising from accidents and injuries for guests..

Owning a Condominium – Condominium policies primarily provide content coverage to condominium owners. In addition, there are special provisions to cover the portions of the dwelling for which you are responsible as defined by the governing rules of the condominium.

Owning a Home on a Farm – If your home is on a farm, a farm owners policy may be appropriate to protect against loss. In general, a farm owners policy provides coverage for farm business exposures, and both property and liability coverages.
 
Insurance Available for Your Property
Before buying an insurance policy, you should check for the types of coverages and products available in New York State. You also need to know the types and limits of coverage you want to purchase. Coverage is available for:
 
Dwelling – This is the structure of the house. (That is considered a covered property.)

Other Structures – These are other structures that are separate from the house. Examples are detached garages or toolsheds.

Personal Property – The contents in your home are considered personal property. This includes furniture, appliances, clothing and computer equipment. Some personal properties are specifically excluded and are either not covered under the policy or have limited coverage. Examples are: money, jewelry and firearms.
 
Loss of Use – This is the cost of additional living expenses incurred, when the dwelling becomes uninhabitable, and the cause is due to a covered loss. Reimbursement, such as the cost of a hotel room, will be made to the insured to maintain a normal standard of living.
 
Information Source:
New York State Department of Insurance
25 Beaver Street One Commerce Plaza
New York, NY 10004 Albany, NY 12257
(212) 480-6400 (800) 342-3736
www.ins.state.ny.us

Tags: fire restoration, flood long island, insurance, insurance claim, disrepair, flood damage, disaster restoration, insurance industry, insurance industry long island

New York DKI Member Companies Create NewYorkDKIMembers.org

Posted on Fri, Dec 03, 2010 @ 10:25 AM

describe the image

NewYorkDKIMembers.org consists of New York Member Companies of Disaster Kleenup International, Inc. (DKI)DKI is a network of the leading, independent property damage restoration contractors across North America. New York DKI Member Companies provide full service to their customers: Emergency response, water damage mitigation, mold remediation, complete reconstruction and much more 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, returning damaged property to pre-loss condition fast and efficiently, delivering complete satisfaction to their consumer, insurance, and corporate customers.

Disaster Kleenup International was founded in 1974 by a small group of restoration contractors seeking the benefits of a collaborative business and personal network. Led by the late Ed York in the 70's, Martin Berry in the 80's, and Derry Strong on the 90's, the DKI network established a reputation in the market for high quality property restoration services throughout the United States and Canada.

Led today by Dale Sailer, President and CEO of Disaster Kleenup International and its parent company DKI Services Corporation since 2002, DKI is proud to be North America's largest disaster restoration contracting organization.

New York DKI Member Companies are dedicated to ensuring a smooth and comprehensive recovery of your property throughout the entire mitigation and restoration process. Our years of experience have given us the ability to complete the most extensive large loss recovery projects.

As North America’s largest disaster restoration contracting organization in North America, DKI is committed to providing exceptional customer service, disaster response planning and emergency response services across the United States and Canada.

DKI returns damaged risk to its pre-loss condition quickly and efficiently, delivering complete satisfaction to all of our customers.

DKI Loss Services is available 24-hours a day, 365 days a year to assist with full-service emergency planning, emergency response and restoration services. These include emergency response, water damage mitigation, fire and contents cleaning, mold remediation, complete reconstruction and much more. 

DKI holds itself to the highest standards in the industry

- Response time of 2 hours or less for emergency services
- Comprehensive claims management processing platform
- Over $1.5 billion in restoration work annually
- Largest inventory of equipment in North America
- Unparalleled coverage with over 350 services locations
- One in six Certified Restorers® is a DKI Member

 

Tags: emergency response, dki, new york dki member company, new york, insurance claim, disaster kleenup international, disaster restoration, new york dki member companies, commercial property damage

FEMA Re-opens Disaster Incident Period to include Severe Storms and Flooding From March 13 - March 31, 2010

Posted on Thu, Jul 15, 2010 @ 08:01 AM

Release Date: July 14, 2010
Release Number: 1899-014

Albany, N.Y. -- Federal and state officials today announced that the incident period of the severe storms has been re-opened to cover the period from March 13 - March 31, 2010 and three additonal counties  -- Otsego, Schoharie, and Warren - have been added to the declaration.

"I am pleased that the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) quickly reviewed the information gathered by state and local officials and approved Governor Paterson's request.  The longer incident period will provide needed reimbursement for communities as they repair damages caused by the severe March weather," said Andrew Feeney Director, New York State Office of Emergency Management (NYS OEM).

Otsego, Schoharie, and Warren Counties join Nassau, Orange, Richmond, Rockland, Suffolk, and Westchester Counties, in being declared disaster areas.

The amendment and additional counties to the incident period have been granted in response to Governor Paterson's appeal of June 29, 2010. The previous incident period was March 13-15. “By helping local and state governments recover, federal disaster assistance has a positive impact on  those communites,” said Federal Coordinating Officer Albie Lewis.

Government entities and certain private non-profits in the additional three counties may be eligible for federal aid through the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA's) Public Assistance Program.  Aid may be available in one or more of the following seven categories: Debris Removal; Emergency Protective Measures; Road Systems and Bridges; Water Control Facilities; Public Buildings and Contents; Public Utilities, and Parks, Recreational and Other.

Federal funding is available on a cost-sharing basis for hazard mitigation measures for all counties and tribes within the state. FEMA funds 75 percent of eligible costs.

Article Source: FEMA

 

Tags: disaster, long island storms march 2010, water damage basement flooding, water damage, FEMA, restoration company, flood damage, disaster restoration, flood, storm damage, storm, storm 2010, mold damage, flood water long island, flooded basements long island

NOAA Expects Busy Atlantic Hurricane Season

Posted on Tue, Jun 01, 2010 @ 04:32 PM

hurricane

An "active to extremely active" hurricane season is expected for the Atlantic Basin this year according to the seasonal outlook issued today by NOAA's Climate Prediction Center - a division of the National Weather Service. As with every hurricane season, this outlook underscores the importance of having a hurricane preparedness plan in place.

Across the entire Atlantic Basin for the six-month season, which begins June 1, NOAA is projecting a 70 percent probability of the following ranges:

  • 14 to 23 Named Storms (top winds of 39 mph or higher), including:
  • 8 to 14 Hurricanes (top winds of 74 mph or higher), of which:
  • 3 to 7 could be Major Hurricanes (Category 3, 4 or 5; winds of at least 111 mph)

"If this outlook holds true, this season could be one of the more active on record," said Jane Lubchenco, Ph.D., under secretary of commerce for oceans and atmosphere and NOAA administrator. "The greater likelihood of storms brings an increased risk of a landfall. In short, we urge everyone to be prepared."

The outlook ranges exceed the seasonal average of 11 named storms, six hurricanes and two major hurricanes. Expected factors supporting this outlook are:

  • Upper atmospheric winds conducive for storms. Wind shear, which can tear apart storms, will be weaker since El Niño in the eastern Pacific has dissipated. Strong wind shear helped suppress storm development during the 2009 hurricane season.
  • Warm Atlantic Ocean water. Sea surface temperatures are expected to remain above average where storms often develop and move across the Atlantic. Record warm temperatures - up to four degrees Fahrenheit above average - are now present in this region.
  • High activity era continues. Since 1995, the tropical multi-decadal signal has brought favorable ocean and atmospheric conditions in sync, leading to more active hurricane seasons. Eight of the last 15 seasons rank in the top ten for the most named storms with 2005 in first place with 28 named storms.

"The main uncertainty in this outlook is how much above normal the season will be. Whether or not we approach the high end of the predicted ranges depends partly on whether or not La Niña develops this summer," said Gerry Bell, Ph.D., lead seasonal hurricane forecaster at NOAA's Climate Prediction Center. "At present we are in a neutral state, but conditions are becoming increasingly favorable for La Niña to develop."

"FEMA is working across the administration and with our state and local partners to ensure we're prepared for hurricane season," said FEMA Administrator Craig Fugate. "But we can only be as prepared as the public, so it's important that families and businesses in coastal communities take steps now to be ready. These include developing a communications plan, putting together a kit, and staying informed of the latest forecasts and local emergency plans. You can't control when a hurricane or other emergency may happen, but you can make sure you're ready."

The president recently designated May 23-29, 2010, as National Hurricane Preparedness Week. NOAA and FEMA encourage those living in hurricane-prone states to use this time to review their overall preparedness. More information on individual and family preparedness can be found at http://www.ready.gov/ and http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/HAW2/english/intro.shtml.

NOAA scientists will continue to monitor evolving conditions in the tropics and will issue an updated hurricane outlook in early August, just prior to what is historically the peak period for hurricane activity.

NOAA's mission is to understand and predict changes in the Earth's environment, from the depths of the ocean to the surface of the sun, and to conserve and manage our coastal and marine resources. Visit NOAA on Facebook.

Article Source: NOAA

Tags: wind damage, property damage, water damage restoration, hurricane damage long island, disaster kleenup interntional, restoration company, disrepair, disaster restoration, 2010 Hurricane Season, hurricanes long island, hurricane long island, hurricane damage, hurricane damage cleanup, hurricane, flooded basements long island

Were You Impacted by the Heavy Winds on Long Island?

Posted on Mon, May 10, 2010 @ 11:18 AM

 

Strong winds hit the New York area this weekend, causing property damage to some homes and businesses throughout parts of Long Island.

Falling trees and limbs cause hundreds of millions of dollars of damage each year, as well as personal injuries and deaths. Windstorms and ice storms are leading causes of such damage and injuries.

Tree-related damage is usually apparent. Limbs crashing through a roof or onto automobiles or power lines are hard to miss. Sometimes the damage is so severe that entire homes are destroyed. This is especially likely to happen when large trees are torn out of the ground and topple onto a house, crashing through the structure or knocking it off its foundation.

Some trees are also notorious for aggressively sending out roots that can damage the foundation of a house, buckle sidewalks or plug up septic systems, forcing homeowners to spend thousands of dollars for repairs.

The kinds of trees in a yard, their proximity to a house and the care they receive all affect safety and the potential for damage or personal injury.

Some potential problems are easy to spot. These include:

-Cracks in the trunk or major limbs.
-Hollow and decayed trees.
-Trees that look one-sided or lean significantly.
-Branches hanging over the house near the roof.
-Limbs in contact with power lines.
-Mushrooms growing from the bark, indicating a decayed or weakened stem.
-V-shaped forks rather than U-shaped ones. V-shaped are more likely to split.
-Crossing branches that rub or interfere with one other.

Tree care professionals, including arborists, can also examine trees for more subtle signs of trouble and take care of any problems, such as the need to cut down a tree or prune limbs that might be too big, too high, or too dangerous for a homeowner to take down. Arborists can also help save trees and limbs.

Homeowners, though, represent the first line of defense. Regularly examine trees and check for damage or other trouble signs and take corrective action if necessary, either on your own or with the help of an expert.

Proper pruning
Good pruning can prevent many problems. Prompt removal of diseased, damaged or dead plant parts helps limit the spread of harmful insects and disease, as well as reduce the possibility of future storm damage. Pruning can also have other benefits. For instance, pruning a dense canopy reduces its mass while permitting better air circulation and sunlight penetration. Pruning also helps provide proper shape and improves the health and vigor of the plant.  Do not over prune, a practice called hat racking, as this will significantly weaken a tree.


Experts offer these pruning tips:

  • Check local tree regulations prior to pruning or tree removal.
  • Avoid pruning branches flush to the trunk. Doing so removes not only the limb but some of the trunk wood, opening the plant to possible decay or insect damage.
  • Begin by making a cut partway through the bottom of any limb to be trimmed, a few inches from the trunk. Then cut through the limb just above the first cut. This ensures that when the limb falls, it will not tear off a long strip of bark on the way down.
  • Finish by cutting off the few inches sticking out from the trunk. Be sure to leave the "branch collar," the swollen area of trunk tissue that forms around the base of a branch. Leaving the branch collar protects the main trunk from damage.


After a Storm
The type of care you give after a storm should depend on a tree's age, the extent and type of damage. 

To care for storm damaged trees:

  • Plan ahead before deciding what to do with fallen trees. 
  • In general, it is best to reset only smaller trees, since large trees will be weakened and may fall again.
  • Decide what to do with tree stumps. 
  • If you are going to leave them, cut them off flush with the ground. 
  • If you plan to remove them, leave four feet of stump standing. 
  • Removal will be cheaper and easier if stumps can be pulled out instead of dug out.
  • Cut off broken or torn limbs to avoid unnecessary bark stripping.
  • When straightened, uprooted trees will require bracing for a long time. 
  • Before you reset a tree, cut, smooth and paint all jagged and irregular root breaks. 
  • Water the tree well and fertilize. 
  • Do not remove guy wires or braces for two years.
  • After repairing trees, continue to care for them.  Check soil moisture regularly.  
  • Prune a damaged tree just enough to balance the loss of roots. 
  • Cut out broken, diseased and malformed branches to give the tree a desirable shape.

If you have property damage to your home or business and need assistance, please contact Advanced Restoration's staff at (800) 693-6263. Advanced Restoration Corporation serves Nassau and Suffolk County, and the New York Metro area.  

Tags: wind damage, nassau county restoration, disaster kleenup, advanced restoration corporation, emergency service, disaster restoration, home repair, catastrophe

Long Island After the Storms: Replacing Damaged Building Materials

Posted on Sun, Apr 25, 2010 @ 04:29 PM

 

We have received hundreds of calls from people all over Long Island telling us they had and in some cases still have, water in their basement due to groundwater.  As in most cases, it was not covered by their insurance company.  Which means you have either cleaned it up yourself or paid a company like Advanced Restoration Corporation to mitigate the water damage for you. 

The basement is now cleaned up and dried.  But that brings up the million dollar question......what do you do with the basement now?  If it was a finished basement that you used as living space and/or work space, how do you rebuild?  Or do you leave it unfinished now not wanting to take on the un-budgeted expense of the reconstruction in the off chance of having to go through it all over again if we are hit with another series of severe storms.  That is a choice every Long Island homeowner who was affected by these recent storms has to make.  For the sake of this blog, we are going to assume that you have decided to go through with the reconstruction. 

Let me start by stating that building materials can get wet.  Sheetrock, carpet, and paint are all made with water at some point during their production processes.  Usually after the materials are dried they are stronger and more durable than before they were wet.  Wood can get wet.  The lumber yards are exactly that.  Yards.  Giant lots of land used to store building materials before they are sold and used to construct homes and buildings.  They are not called lumber garages.    Chances are the studs that make up your house had been wet numerous times before the builder used them to frame your home. 

It is not a question of if something gets wet is it unsalvageable.  It is a question of how quickly you react when building materials do get wet. The faster the action the greater the chances of salvaging ALL the affected building materials.

There is something you can do that not many people have caught on to yet and none of the professionals on TV talk about just because they have yet to go through the experience of having their home saturated by water.  You can rebuild with building materials that can withstand an intrusion of water. 

Of course it is a bit more expensive to rebuild with this in mind and every homeowner is going to have see what works best for their budget and quality of life.  But here are some things to think about when rebuilding your basement:

Install ceramic tile as your flooring.  Carpet can get wet and be salvaged if dried timely and professionally, vinyl does not absorb the water but traps it underneath so that demolition is inevitable, the same with any type of wood flooring that would have to have a vapor barrier installed underneath  The best choice to finish a floor in a basement short of polishing the concrete is ceramic tile.  It is not a porous material so it does not absorb moisture and mold will not grow on the ceramic.  (Mold will grow on the dirt that is on the ceramic tile but will not start eating the tile away like it would on a porous material like sheetrock or carpet.)  And the grout allows the water vapor to escape from underneath the tile in the drying process.  Put an area rug on top of the tile that is much easier to remove and have cleaned that typical wall to wall carpeting.  

Do not use ANY vinyl.  I know vinyl makes it very easy to clean and keep on top off but it is the worst material (short of asbestos) to use as a finished building material.  Anything that vinyl covers that gets wet 99.9% of the time has to be removed.  Vinyl acts as a vapor barrier that traps the moisture behind it and does not allow the building materials to dry.  Which causes mold growth and usually increases the dollar value of the project.  Use standard wood base trim or carpet cove base.  They can both allow the walls to be dried in place or they both can be easily detached and reset once the drying process is over.

Use Concrete Board for the lower walls.  Do not install regular gypsum drywall on the lower walls.  Use concrete board that builders use in bathrooms to protect against moisture in the shower / tub areas.  They come in 4' x 8' sheets.  Just turn them on their side and install them on the lower 4' of the basement walls.  The great value of cement board is does not rot, warp, grow mold, or deteriorate, when subjected to water.

* If you decide that you are going to install standard drywall on the lower walls please make sure that the sheetrock is elevated 1/2" to 3/4" off the ground and is not sitting directly on the concrete.  If the drywall is resting directly on the concrete floor you will always have a transference of moisture from the concrete to to the dryer sheetrock which eventually will turn into a long term mold problem.  See the picture below. 


Use Only Flat Paint.  Any semi-gloss, high gloss or even eggshell finishes creates a vapor barrier that does not allow the materials behind it to dry naturally in the event of an intrusion.

Use American Clay Earth Plasters as your wall finishes American Clay Earth Plasters are a natural, environmentally friendly way to finish any interior. Non-toxic and made in the USA, these plasters are an alternative to cement, acrylic and lime plasters, offering superior color, richness, texture and depth not found with other finishes.  They also help control the inside ambient temperatures in the room(s0 it is installed on the walls.  They absorb excess moisture in the warmer months and release moisture n the environment during the colder dryer months.  This also gives it the ability to permit the drying of the building materials it is installed over.  

If you are in the Long Island and New York City areas and have any questions and/or need any assistance in dealing with your property damage claim please do not hesitate to contact Advanced Restoration Corporation.  We are Disaster Kleenup International (DKI) Member company.  DKI has over 150 member companies located throughout the United States.  Click here to find one in your area.

 

Tags: water damage long island, long island, property damage, water damage, dki, property damage long island, disaster kleenup interntional, disaster kleenup, replacing damage building materials, concrete board, american clay plaster, new york, advanced restoration corporation, reconstruction, disaster restoration, long island after the storms, replacing building materials

Insurance Journal