Property Damage & Disaster Restoration Blog: Long Island & New York City

Disaster Kleanup International Names New Director of Marketing

Posted on Wed, Jul 25, 2012 @ 09:28 AM

disaster kleenup international,dki,disaster,disasters,mary smith,director of marketing,disaster restoration

                                           DKI: North America's Largest Disaster Restoration Organization

                                                             DKI Names Mary Smith as Director of Marketing 

Mary Smith is a marketing communications veteran with twenty years of experience in various industries including the fitness, wellness, and entertainment fields. She is well versed in marketing, public relations, event management, advertising, promotional products, and branding.

Previous to this role Smith held the position of Director of Marketing for Nautilus, the fitness manufacturing icon. She was responsible for creating a domestic and international marketing program and creative strategy for the company. She also managed all trade shows and special projects.

"We are very excited to have Mary join the DKI team. Her extensive marketing communications experience will be a perfect fit for DKI's direction and business needs. It is my feeling that Mary will very quickly become an asset to our growing leadership team," said Dan Cassara, DKI President and CEO.

Smith earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Journalism and Mass Communication from the University of Iowa and received her Master of Science degree in Advertising from the University of Illinois.

Smith will be based in the company's National Headquarters in Wood Dale, Illinois.

About DKI

Disaster Kleenup International (DKI), LLC, headquartered in suburban Chicago, is the largest disaster restoration contracting organization in North America. DKI Member Companies provide full service restoration to their customers: emergency response, water damage mitigation, fire and contents cleaning, mold remediation, complete reconstruction and much more, 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. DKI returns damaged property to its pre-loss condition quickly and efficiently, delivering complete satisfaction to our consumer, insurance, and corporate customers. For more information about Disaster Kleenup International, LLC, visit our website at www.disasterkleenup.com or contact Mary Smith at (630) 350-3000.

Tags: mary smith, property damage, dki, restoration, disaster kleenup international, disaster restoration, disasters

Mobile App to Aid In Case of Disaster On Long Island & New York City

Posted on Thu, Jun 07, 2012 @ 09:21 AM

fema disaster plan disaster preparedness long island new york business continuity plan disaster recovery advanced restoration coropration

The FEMA App contains preparedness information for different types of disasters, an interactive checklist for emergency kits, a section to plan emergency meeting locations, information on how to stay safe and recover after a disaster, a map with FEMA Disaster Recovery Center locations (one-stop centers where disaster survivors can access key relie

f services) and Shelters, general ways the public can get involved before and after a disaster, and the FEMA blog. Terms of Use for the FEMA App: http://www.fema.gov/app.

Click on the FEMA logo to download the FEMA app for Android.  Available on Apple's iOS too. 

Tags: disaster, long island, FEMA, emergency, new york, new york city, disaster preparedness, disasters, disaster recovery

Insurance Claims: What To Do After A Disaster Due to A Storm

Posted on Tue, Feb 14, 2012 @ 03:47 PM

insurance claim, insurance claims,insurance,property damage,storm damage,disaster,disasters,restoration,long island,new york

After the storm, besides making temporary repairs, there are several steps you should take that will aid in the filing of an insurance claim.
 
Make temporary repairs

  • Make temporary repairs to prevent further weather related damage. Cover holes in the roof, walls, doors and windows with plastic or boards. Be careful not to risk your own safety in making the repairs.
  • Save receipts for any material you buy. Your insurance company will reimburse you for the cost.
  • Beware of building contractors that encourage you to spend a lot of money on temporary repairs. Remember that payments for temporary repairs are part of the total settlement. If you pay a contractor a large sum for a temporary repair job, you may not have enough money for permanent repairs.
  • Don't make extensive permanent repairs until after the claims adjuster has been to your home and assessed the damage.
  • Avoid using electrical appliances, including stereos and television sets, that have been exposed to water unless they've been checked by a technician.
 
Call your insurance agent or insurance company
  • Report the damage to your insurance agent or insurance company representative. Ask questions such as: Am I covered? Does my claim exceed my deductible? (Your deductible is the amount of loss you agree to pay yourself when you buy a policy.) How long will it take to process my claim? Will I need to obtain estimates for repairs to structural damage?
 
Save receipts for additional living expenses. 
  • Most homeowners policies cover additional living expenses such as food and housing costs, telephone or utility installation costs in a temporary residence, extra transportation costs to and from work or school, relocation and storage expenses and furniture rental for a temporary residence. Your insurance company will usually advance you money for these expenses. The payments will be part of the final claim settlement. Let your insurance company know where you can be reached so that the claims adjuster can give you a check.
  • The maximum amount available to pay for such expenses is generally equal to 20 percent of the insurance on your home. So on a home insured for $100,000, up to $20,000 would be available. This amount is in addition to the $100,000 to pay for repairs or to rebuild your home. Some insurance companies pay more than 20 percent. Others limit additional living expenses to the amount actually spent during a certain period of time, such as 12 months, instead of a maximum percentage of the policy limit.
 

Preparing for the adjuster's visit

The claims process may begin in one of two ways.
  1. Your insurance company may send you a claim form, known as a "proof of loss form," to complete.
  2. An adjuster may visit your home before you're asked to fill out any forms. (An adjuster is a person professionally trained to assess the damage.) Usually, the more information you have about your damaged home and belongings the faster your claim can be settled.
  • Major disasters make enormous demands on insurance company personnel. Your adjuster generally will come prepared to do a thorough and complete study of the damage to your home. However, the large number of claims may place time restrictions on adjusters forcing them to "scope the loss." If your adjuster doesn't make a complete evaluation of the loss on the first visit, try to set up an appointment for a second visit.
  • Be sure to keep copies of lists and other documents you submit to your insurance company. Also, keep copies of whatever paperwork your insurance company gives you.
Personal Belongings:
  1. Make lists of the damaged items. Include the brand names and model numbers of appliances and electronic equipment. If possible, take photographs of the damage. Don't forget to list items such as clothing, sports equipment, tools, china, linens, outside furniture, holiday decorations and hobby materials.
  2. Use your home inventory or put together a set of records - old receipts, bills and photographs - to help establish the price and age of everything that needs to be replaced or repaired.
  3. If your property was destroyed or you no longer have any records, you will have to work from memory. Try to picture the contents of every room and then write a description of what was there. Try also to remember where and when you bought each piece and about how much you paid.
  4. Don't throw out damaged furniture and other expensive items because the adjuster will want to see them.
Structure of Your Home:
  1. Identify the structural damage to your home and other buildings on your premises, like a garage, toolshed or in-ground swimming pool.
  2. Make a list of everything you would like to show the adjuster when he or she arrives. This should include cracks in the walls, damage to the floor or ceiling and missing roof tiles. If structural damage is likely even though you can't see any signs of it, discuss this with your adjuster. In some cases, the adjuster may recommend hiring a licensed engineer or architect to inspect the property.
  3. Have the electrical system checked. Most insurance companies pay for such inspections.
  4. Get written bids from reliable, licensed contractors on the repair work. The bids should include details of the materials to be used and prices on a line-by-line basis.

This article was taken from Local10.com

 

Tags: reoprting a claim, what to do after a storm, property damage, insurance claims, insurance, restoration, disasters

Changing Climate = More Disasters, Property Damage, Insurance Claims

Posted on Tue, Jan 31, 2012 @ 12:56 PM

disaster,disasters,property damage,disaster restoration,insurance,insurance claims,property loss,long island,new york,hurricane,climate change,weather,advanced restorationLast year's extreme weather across the U.S. — 2011 was the most expensive year ever for natural disasters — is raising concern among scientists and policymakers about the nation's ability to withstand a shifting climate.

Damage from tornadoes, floods, droughts, hurricanes and wildfires caused more than $200 billion in losses and 1,000 deaths across the nation last year. Florida escaped major damage, but saw record high temperatures over the summer, after a much colder than normal winter.

The conversation about climate change has to move beyond debates about greenhouse gases to discussions about making homes and infrastructure more resilient to weather, said Margaret Davidson, director of the Coastal Services Center for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

Communities must reduce their vulnerabilty, she said during a forum on adapting to climate change at the American Meteorological Society meeting here.

Recent trends show the cost of natural disasters escalating while the government's financial ability to deal with those losses shrinks. Climate scientists anticipate an uptick in extreme weather as the global climate warms.

"You can see there's a train wreck coming and it has to do with Mother Nature," Davidson said.

In communities where disasters, such as floods and storm surge, occur frequently, the knee-jerk reaction is to rebuild the same roads and bridges that existed before and bigger, more expensive homes. Those "stupid" decisions cost the nation, Davidson said, adding that 70 percent of repetitive losses covered by the Federal Emergency Management Agency are in coastal counties.

Floods this year caused some of the most dramatic and costly damage. Hurricane Irene, which brought devastating and record-breaking floods to Vermont, hit the East Coast three times. The storm killed 45 people and inflicted $7.3 billion in damage. The cost of recovery caused tension in Congress when some leaders balked at sending relief to affected communities.

The Midwest and Northern Plains saw record floods from snowmelt and torrential rainfall that swelled the Mississippi, Ohio and Missouri Rivers.

Seven states in the Northeast and the Ohio Valley had their wettest year on record, with some seeing rainfall of up to 8 inches above normal, said Jake Crouch, a physical scientist with the National Climactic Data Center, a federal agency that publishes and annual State of the Climate report.

Meanwhile, the southern tier of the nation baked in drought. Texas experienced its greatest drought on record and saw raging wildfires that destroyed 1,500 homes. Nearly 60 percent of the nation plunged into drought last year, also breaking a record.

In 2011, 58 percent of the nation was either extremely wet or extremely dry, the highest percentage ever, according the report.

It was also a year of devastating tornadoes across the Midwest and the Southeast. The spring storm season sent waves of cold fronts colliding with the warm, moist atmosphere over the Southeast. The severe storms triggered 1,155 tornadoes, killing more than 300 people and causing $20 billion in damage.

The nation saw a total of 14 natural disasters that cost more than $1 billion each, breaking another new record, and underscoring the effect of climate extremes on people, Crouch said.

While scientists cannot blame any single disaster on climate change, they can point to trends and make comparisons between what they see and what changes are predicted in a warmer world. Last year fit with expectations that a warmer Earth would bring much more rain to the Northeast, drought to the Southern Plains, warmer than normal temperatures in the high latitudes, such as those of Norway and Siberia, and shrinking sea ice.

For the U.S., extreme drought and rainfall were likely a combination of climate change and regular climate variation related to sea surface temperatures in the Pacific, Crouch said. Last year was dominated by La Niña, a weather pattern triggered by cooler than normal Pacific seas.

An interesting obversation that Crouch noted, however, was that La Niña years tend to be cooler globally. Last year was the 11th warmest year on record and the warmest La Niña year on record.

 

Tags: property damage, insurance claims, insurance, new york, disasters, long idland, damages, extreme weather

Insurance Journal