Property Damage & Disaster Restoration Blog: Long Island & New York City

TODAY Has Been Declared an Air Quality Action Day!

Posted on Fri, Jun 04, 2010 @ 10:31 AM

URGENT!
An Air Quality Action Day is forecast in our
region for today (Friday, June 4, 2010).

The New York State Department of Transportation has declared that
today (Friday, June 4, 2010) is an Air Quality Action
Day in the downstate metro area due to forecasted high levels of
ground-level ozone pollution in parts of the region (please visit
the Clean Air NY Web site for more information
http://www.cleanairny.org/LocalAirQuality/Default.aspx). While
today is still a day when people can go about most of
their normal activities, such as going to work, driving may be
one of the most polluting activities that you do today, and we
encourage everyone to leave their cars at home if possible.

Ground-level ozone is a respiratory irritant that can trigger
asthma attacks and aggravate emphysema, bronchitis and other
respiratory ailments. Children, people with pre-existing
respiratory or heart conditions, people doing strenuous outdoor
work or exercise and the elderly are particularly vulnerable to
the effects of ozone.

Here are several simple steps you can take on Air Quality Action
Days to prevent pollution:

Combine errands into a single trip, rather than separate trips.
This can help save time and reduce the amount of pollution
emitted from your vehicle.

Take the subway, bus or train when possible.

Postpone unnecessary trips.

Avoiding motor vehicle trips on Air Quality Action Days will prevent the formation of air pollution.

Refuel your vehicle in the evening when it's cooler outside.

Avoid letting your vehicle idle, such as at the fast food or bank
teller drive-thru.

Postpone using gas-powered gardening equipment such as lawn
mowers on Air Quality Action Days. Wait for a day when air
quality is better.

Forward this message to your family and friends.

To learn more about improving air quality or if you were
forwarded this message and want us to send updates to your own
e-mail address, visit CleanAirNY.org or call 1-877-ILUVAIR
(1-877-458-8247).

Clean Air NY is sponsored by the New York State Department of
Transportation in support of regionwide air-quality efforts.

511NY is New York State's official traffic and travel info
source. Whether you drive or take public transit, click here for
precisely what you need, or simply dial 511 on your phone.

Follow Clean Air NY on Facebook, Twitter, and Blogger.

You received this update because you provided your contact
information to Clean Air NY. To ensure delivery, please be sure
to add info@CleanAirNY.org to your e-mail address book or safe
list.

CleanAirNY.org
1-877-ILUVAIR (1-877-458-8247)
342 Broadway
Suite 404
New York, NY 10013
info@CleanAirNY.org

Tags: air quality, environmental, advanced restoration, clean air, environment, contents cleaning

From ReedConstructionData.com - Building Deconstruction

Posted on Wed, May 26, 2010 @ 12:55 AM

reedconstructiondata.com,building deconstruction,building material reuse

 www.reedconstructiondata.com

March 30, 2010 - Phil Waier, PE, LEED AP

A component of the “Green” movement is building deconstruction. Rather than demolishing a structure and delivering the debris to landfill, building deconstruction provides for the careful removal and reuse or recycling of building materials. The materials can be stored and reused on the existing site thus eliminating transportation charges. The alternative is to sell or donate the deconstructed materials.

Typical materials considered for deconstruction include the following:

  • Interior doors and frames
  • Structural framing
  • Casework
  • Brick masonry
  • Plumbing fixtures
  • Wood strip flooring
  • Roof sheathing boards and metal roofing

The decision to deconstruct is based upon several factors; the first is a site assessment. This involves evaluating the materials based upon type, quality level and condition, quality and installation method. Another aspect of site assessment is the adequacy of the site to store and clean/process the materials. The second consideration is the potential market for the materials if they are not being reused for the project. The current price for new materials must be compared to the potentials sale price of the deconstructed material. That price is based upon the condition and quality of the deconstructed material. The presence of local salvage retailers and the ability to market and cost of transporting the materials is also a consideration. Safety is a key concern in the planning and executing of a deconstruction project.

Aside from the LEED incentives/credits for deconstruction there are a number of other reasons to deconstruct.

  • Newer replacement materials may be scarce or of lesser quality. An example is the structural timbers used in many old mill buildings. These timbers are frequently larger and longer that those commercially available today. Also their old growth strength is greater than wood from newer forests.
  • Demolition disposal costs continue to escalate as solid waste land fills are closed and new land fills are plagued by permitting issues.
  • Commodities such as steel, copper and aluminum are becoming more expensive and substantial energy can be saved by recycling.

A final consideration in building deconstruction is schedule. The deconstruction process is more labor intensive than demolition, therefore time must be provided in the construction schedule to allow for the process.

In the final analysis the cost, time, and environmental considerations will be the determining factors.

Tags: environmental, building material reuse, reedconstructiondata.com, environment, building deconstruction, donate, salvaged materials

Catastrophe Experts Call for Quick Action on Catastrophe Protection

Posted on Wed, Mar 10, 2010 @ 04:12 PM

Former FEMA Director: The status quo is not acceptable

WASHINGTON, March 10 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- James Lee Witt, the former Director of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and the current co-chair of ProtectingAmerica.org today urged a subcommittee to the House Financial Services Committee to move quickly to enact legislation that would help American families and communities be better prepared for and protected from the devastation caused by massive natural catastrophes such as earthquakes and hurricanes.

"A catastrophic event, whether an earthquake striking one of our great American cities, or a massive hurricane making landfall near any of the metropolitan areas from New York to Houston, would cause such enormous damage that our economy would be stunned, private resources quickly depleted, and an immediate federal bailout of hundreds of billions of dollars could potentially be required," Mr. Witt stated.  

"The American public has lost its appetite for bailouts.  Clearly the nation, our families and our communities would be better served by a program that uses private insurer dollars to pre-fund coverage for the eventuality of the next massive hurricane or devastating earthquake," Witt said. "There is no place in the country that is immune from catastrophic natural events, and the stakes are higher than ever.  Major cities along the coasts, and throughout the West and Midwest, are threatened by devastating earthquakes or hurricanes.  The human, physical and economic toll that such events would take would be unfathomable," he said.

"To put it simply, the status quo is not acceptable.  There is an urgent need for a comprehensive and integrated program that strengthens America's financial infrastructure, improves mitigation and readiness to prepare and protect our families and communities before and during catastrophe, and creates a privately-funded backstop that assures that resources will be available to rebuild, repair and recover as quickly as possible," Witt said.

Witt testified before the House of Representatives Committee on Financial Services Subcommittee on Housing and Community Opportunity and Subcommittee on Capital Markets, Insurance, and Government Sponsored Enterprises in support of HR 2555, the Homeowners' Defense Act, a bill sponsored by Rep. Ron Klein (D-FL) and more than 70 cosponsors from across the nation.

The bill would provide more protection at lower cost for consumers and provide additional capacity and stability to the market.

The bill would also mandate and help finance enhanced mitigation and prevention through better land use planning, establishment and enforcement of stronger building codes and better education training and equipment for first responders.  

An earlier version of the Homeowners' Defense Act passed the House of Representatives in the last session of Congress by a bipartisan margin of 258-155.

ProtectingAmerica.org is a non-profit organization with over 300 members including the American Red Cross, the International Association of Fire Chiefs, and other emergency responders, emergency management officials, police organizations, Allstate and State Farm Insurance, and large and small businesses.  The organization has more than 20,000 individual members.

ProtectingAmerica.org is co-chaired by James Lee Witt, former director of the Federal Emergency Management Agency and Admiral James M. Loy, former deputy secretary of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and former commandant of the U.S. Coast Guard.  

A Nation Exposed

  • Risk experts and modelers suggest that 57 percent of the American public resides in areas that are prone to earthquakes, hurricanes or other disasters.  
  • Twenty states, including Hawaii and every state that borders the Atlantic Ocean and Gulf of Mexico, face the threat of hurricanes every year.
  • The largest earthquake to ever rock the continental U.S. emanated from New Madrid, Missouri in 1811 and affected an area that stretched from Mississippi to Michigan, from Pennsylvania to Nebraska.
  • Eight out of the 11 most costly U.S. natural catastrophes have occurred since 2001.
  • Since 1900, 11 hurricanes have made direct hits on New England; six of them on the New York coastline.  The "Long Island Express," a massive hurricane that in 1938 made landfall in Long Island and raced through Connecticut, Rhode Island and Massachusetts, killed 700 people and left 63,000 people homeless.  If the same storm struck today, damages would exceed $100 billion according to risk modelers.

About ProtectingAmerica.org

ProtectingAmerica.org is a non-profit organization consisting of emergency management officials, first responders, disaster relief experts, insurers and others.  Its members include the American Red Cross and more than 300 other organizations and businesses.

At the core of ProtectingAmerica.org's mission is the establishment of a comprehensive, integrated national catastrophe management solution that will better prepare and protect American families, communities, consumers and the American economy from catastrophe.   

ProtectingAmerica.org is working to increase public awareness and enhance consumer education; advocate for better coordination with local, state and federal mitigation and recovery efforts, and strengthen emergency response and financial mechanisms to rebuild after a major catastrophe.

The organization supports comprehensive federal legislation that would establish a privately financed national catastrophe fund that would serve as a backstop to state catastrophe funds.  The funds' private deposits and the majority of its earnings could only be used to cover replacement and rebuilding costs following major catastrophic events.  A portion of the funds' earnings would be dedicated to increase public and consumer education, strengthen first responders, and enhance building codes and their enforcement.

 

SOURCE ProtectingAmerica.org

Tags: emergency response, property damage, ny water damage company, nassau county restoration, dki, environmental, first responder, restoration, suffolk county restoration, home repair, catastrophe, hurricane, mitigation, ny, earthquake

Environmental Benefits of Building Deconstruction On Long Island

Posted on Wed, Feb 10, 2010 @ 08:31 PM

Buildings have a significant impact on the environment.  In the U.S., buildings represent more than 50 percent of the nation's wealth. New construction and renovation account for approximately $800 billion or approximately 13 percent of the Gross Domestic Product and employ over 10 million people.  The construction industry uses 40% of all extracted materials.  Thirty percent of all energy used is a result of the construction industry and the built environment.

By reducing waste generation, deconstruction also reduces climate gas emissions, and abates the need for new landfills and incinerators. Perhaps most importantly, it helps to steer the C&D industry away from traditional consumption and disposal patterns and towards sustainability and reuse. Reducing the industry's consumption of virgin materials helps preserve natural resources and protect the environment from the air, ground, and water pollution related to extraction, processing, and disposal of raw materials.

Each year the United States buries about 33 million tons of wood related construction and demolition debris in our landfills. As anaerobic microorganisms decompose this wood, it will release about 5 million tons of carbon equivalent in the form of methane gas.

This is equivalent to the yearly emissions of 3,736,000 passenger cars.

Producing new building materials from recycled, rather than virgin, materials consumes less energy. Consuming less energy means burning fewer fossil fuels, which in turn means producing fewer green house gases.

Every ton of wood that is reused avoids the creation of 60 pounds of green house gases that would have been created to harvest and mill new lumber.

The Environmental Protection Agency On Building Deconstruction

Building deconstruction is a "grave-to-cradle" program that helps take care of the enormous stock of buildings reaching the end of their useful lives while simultaneously reducing the pressure to mine or harvest natural resources for new construction, reducing the need for landfill space, and creating new jobs.

Construction activities consume 60% of the total raw materials used in the U. S. economy.

Estimates that 136 million tons of building-related C&D waste is generated annually, of which 92% is from renovation and demolition work.

Only 20% to 30% of C&D waste is being recycled.

Tags: environmental, demolition waste, construction and demolition waste, environmental benefits building deconstruction, advanced restoration corporation, building deconstruction, building deconstruction long island, build green, environmental benefits

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