Property Damage & Disaster Restoration Blog: Long Island & New York City

Fire Hazard: Oil-Fired Furnace Recall Alert

Posted on Mon, Feb 02, 2009 @ 03:12 PM



The Consumer Product Safety Commission recently published Release #09-104, which focuses on a recall related to oil-fired furnaces that may result in a fire hazard.

Source: CPSC

NEWS from CPSC
U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission
Office of Information and Public Affairs
Washington, DC 20207
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE January 22, 2009 Release #09-104
Firm's Recall Hotline: (800) 577-3960CPSC Recall Hotline: (800) 638-2772CPSC Media Contact: (301) 504-7908

Rheem Recalls to Repair Oil-Fired Furnaces Due to Fire Hazard
WASHINGTON, D.C. - The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, in cooperation with the firm named below, today announced a voluntary recall of the following consumer product. Consumers should stop using recalled products immediately unless otherwise instructed.

Name of Product: Rheem, Ruud and United Refrigeration Oil-Fired Furnaces
Units: About 14,000

Manufacturer: Air Conditioning Division of Rheem Manufacturing Co., of Fort Smith, Ark.

Hazard: If the furnace is not properly wired, the oil burner can continue to operate when the blower shuts off, posing a fire hazard to consumers.

Incidents/Injuries: Rheem has received one report in which the furnace was incorrectly wired. No injuries or property damage have been reported.
Description: This recall involves oil-fired furnaces sold under the Rheem, Ruud and United Refrigeration brands. Only the models beginning with the model numbers listed in the chart below and with date codes ending in 0106 through 5206, 0107 through 5207, or 0108 through 4808 are included in this recall. The model number and date code (designated by the four digits following an “M” in the middle of the serial number) are printed on the unit’s rating plate, which is on the left wall of the furnace’s interior just above the burner. The rating plate can be found by opening the unit’s burner access door, which has slotted openings.

See Model Number/ Brand & Description

  • ROBF
    Rheem Classic/Ruud Achiever High Efficiency Upflow Oil Furnace
  • ROPF
    Rheem Classic/Ruud Achiever High Efficiency Downflow/Horizontal Oil Furnace
  • TZOUP
    United Refrigeration “Thermal Zone” Upflow Oil Furnace
  • TZODH
    United Refrigeration “Thermal Zone” Downflow/ Horizontal Oil Furnace

Sold by:
Contractors nationwide to consumers from January 2006 through December 2008 as part of installed systems for between $1,500 and $10,000.

Manufactured in: United States
Remedy: Consumers should immediately contact the contractor who installed the oil furnace to arrange for a free inspection and repair, if necessary.

Consumer Contact: For additional information, contact Rheem at (800) 577-3960 between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. CT Monday through Friday, or visit the firm’s Web site at www.rheemac.com.

About Us
Advanced Restoration Corporation is a family-owned and operated full-service property damage restoration company with a combined 75 years experience in dealing with Fire Damage Restoration, Water Damage Restoration, Flood & Storm Damage, Mold Remediation, Smoke Damage Restoration and Reconstruction. We service Long Island (Nassau County, NY; Suffolk County, NY) and the New York Metro area. Call (800) 693- 6263 for additional information, or visit us on the web at www.AdvancedRestoration.com.

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It's Cold Out...Stay Warm & Be Safe!

Posted on Wed, Jan 14, 2009 @ 04:58 PM

Arctic air is expected to hit the New York Metro area by tomorrow, and is expected to last until Sunday. Many Homeowners will be using various heating sources to stay warm, including electric heaters and fireplaces. Fire safety is essential to your family and should be discussed with all members of your household.

Heating equipment is among the leading causes of home fires nationally and in New York State. Very often heating related fires are the result of a lack of maintenance or simple acts of carelessness. Following the guidelines below will help to ensure that you reduce the possibility of experiencing a heating related fire.

Fire tips from NY State's Office of Fire Prevention and Control include:

Fire Prevention
To prevent fires, keep furnishings and other combustibles 36 inches from all heating sources. A heating source too close to combustibles is the leading cause of fires due to home heating. Store matches and other fire starting appliances out of the reach of children. Fires started by children often have tragic results.

Follow Proper Maintenance
Proper maintenance and an annual inspection of heat pumps, furnaces, space heaters, wood and coal stoves, fireplaces, chimneys and chimney connections by qualified specialists can prevent fires and save lives. Follow the manufacturer’s instructions for installation, venting, fueling, maintenance and repair.

Review the owner's manual to make sure you remember the operating and safety features.

  • Space Heaters – When using portable heaters, do not place them where it is possible for small children or pets to fall against them or to receive a contact burn. Avoid the use of extension cords with electric heaters. Always turn off space heaters before leaving the room or going to bed.
  • Fuel Burning Appliances – When taking a heater out of storage in the fall, install batteries and inspect the shut off mechanism and wick for proper operation. Fill the tank with fresh fuel. Let the heater cool down before refueling. Adding fuel to a hot heater can start a dangerous fire.
  • Wood Burning Appliances and Fireplaces – Do not burn trash in the wood stove or fireplace. Burn only well-seasoned hardwoods. Be sure the fire you build fits your fireplace or stove, don’t overload it. Be sure wood stoves are installed at least 36 inches away from the wall. Keep combustible materials well away from the fireplace, stove and chimney. Keep the area around them clean. Always use a fireplace screen to prevent sparks from leaving the fireplace and starting a fire. Never leave a fire unattended.
  • Chimneys - Creosote accumulation is the leading cause of chimney fires. A chimney that is dirty, blocked or is in disrepair can inhibit proper venting of smoke up the flue and can also cause a chimney fire. Nearly all residential fires originating in the chimney are preventable. An annual chimney inspection by a qualified chimney sweep can prevent fire or carbon monoxide poisoning.
  • Ashes – Keep wood stoves and fireplaces free of excess ash buildup. Excessive ash buildup prevents good circulation of air needed for combustion. When removing ashes, use a metal container with a tight-fitting cover. Always place ashes in an outside location away from structures. Ashes that seem cool may contain a smoldering charcoal that can start a fire.

Advanced Restoration is a full service property damage restoration company and is trained to respond to all aspects of fire, smoke damage and water damage that can occur after a fire. Call us at (800) 693-6263 for more information, or visit our website at www.AdvancedRestoration.com.

We are truly committed to Making Disaster Temporary and Restoration Permanent.

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Puffbacks and Your Heating System

Posted on Tue, Jan 06, 2009 @ 01:17 PM



Ensure Your Heating System is Working Properly!

Winter is here and so is the cold weather, which means your heating system will be working around the clock. Now is the season when you may experience a puffback related to your heating system.

What is a puffback?
Most of us have never heard of a puffback. A puffback occurs when an oil burner backfires, sending soot throughout your home or business. It can happen all at once, or more slowly and gradually.

Soot covers all areas of the home or business & may range from light to very heavy. Sometimes the disbursement of soot is so light & fine it appears to be ordinary dust. This "dust" however, can re-appear hours after being cleaned, there is often a strong odor of oil accompanying a puffback.

How can a puffback be prevented?
The best defense against a puffback is to have your oil burner inspected annually & kept in good repair. This is no guarantee against having a puffback, but it greatly reduces your risk.Keep debris, animal hair or anything that could interfere with proper functioning away from your oil burner.

What to do if a puffback occurs?
Notify your insurance agent or company immediately. Have a qualified disaster restoration specialist begin cleaning all affected areas immediately. Soot travels & will re-appear if not completely removed.

If you live in the NY Metro area and experience a puffback in your home or business, please call Advanced Restoration. Our experts will promptly respond to your situation! Our experienced staff is available 24/7 and can be reached at (800) 693-6263, or visit our website at http://www.advancedrrestoration.com/.

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Winter Is Coming

Posted on Wed, Nov 05, 2008 @ 01:23 PM

WINTER FORECASTS
How accurate were they?

Some winters can be tougher than the NFL football season!

Last year, Long Island had a relatively mild winter and readings from LI Mac-Arthur Airport related to the Winter of 2007-2008 indicated:

Mean temperature: 34.2 degrees vs. normal temperature based on 30-year average: 33.7 degrees.


Last year’s overall predictions for winter of ’07-’08:

  • National Weather Service: Above average temperatures for most of the U.S.
  • AccuWeather Inc.: Marginally warmer than normal
  • WSI Inc.: Warmer than usual
  • Weather 2000 Inc.: Slightly cooler than 10-year average, warmer than 30-year average
  • The Farmers Almanac: “Two-faced winter” for the nation, with extremes of warm and dry, and cold and wet, varying by region
  • The Old Farmers Almanac: Warmer than normal, but slightly colder than winter of ‘06-‘07

Could this winter's weather add to our economic woes on Long Island?
As homeowners across the country pray for a mild winter to offset rising energy costs, the world-famous Farmers’ Almanac is warning us to prepare for the worst. “Numb’s the word!” is how the 192-year-old publication is predicting the upcoming winter season. For 2008–2009, the Farmers’ Almanac is forecasting a “numbing” winter, with below-average temperatures for at least two-thirds of the country. Only the Far West and Southeast will see near-normal temperatures. Few, if any, locations will enjoy many above-normal temperature days this upcoming season.

Snow?
Precipitation-wise, most of the South, as well as the Midwest, should experience above-normal conditions, while the rest of the nation will average close to normal. With below-normal winter temperatures and an above-normal precipitation forecast, the Great Lakes and Midwest will see above-normal snowfalls, especially during January and February. Above-normal precipitation is forecast for the Southwest during December 2008 and for the Southeast in January and February 2009. It should also turn out to be an unusually wet and/or snowy February across the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic.

The other long-range forecasts for the impending winter season were predicting mostly above-normal temperatures nationwide, with no prolonged spells of cold weather, and limited precipitation.

The Farmers’ Almanac, in contrast, predicted that it would be a "two-faced" winter, with warm and dry extremes balancing extremes of cold and wet. For those of you who live in the Midwest, northern New England, and parts of the West, last winter was anything but mild and warm. Snowfall records were broken, and winter seemed as if it would never end.

Highlights from last winter:

  • The average temperature across the contiguous U.S. during the climatological winter (December 2007–February 2008) was the coolest since 2001.
  • Above-average winter precipitation was the norm for the Midwest and parts of the West.
  • Snowfall was also above normal in northern New England, where some locations posted all-time record winter snow totals. (Find out which towns broke records).

Long-range weather predictions are created almost two years in advance and are based on a formula that has proven to be dependable. People who follow the forecasts claim the accuracy rate is about 80–85%.

For more details on last year and this year's weather, get the 2009 Farmers' Almanac.

Check out other major weather events accurately predicted by the Farmers’ Almanac

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