Property Damage & Disaster Restoration Blog: Long Island & New York City

Long Island Hurricane Watch: Tropics Watch: Monitoring Two Atlantic Systems

Posted on Mon, Jul 30, 2012 @ 11:04 AM

long island hurricane,long island,hurricane,hurricane watch,new york,long island hurricane watch,tropical storm,atlantic ocean,tropical depression,tropical wave

Areas to Watch

Welcome to the WeatherChannel.com's daily analysis of the tropics for the 2012 hurricane season.

(MORE: Tropical update article)

The above image is an overview of the Atlantic and eastern Pacific Ocean basins, based on analysis provided by Senior Meteorologist Stu Ostro (On Twitter | On Facebook) and Hurricane Specialist Bryan Norcross (On Twitter |On Facebook).  Named storms, hurricanes, or depressions in either basin will be labeled on the graphic.  Any other features of interest we're keeping an eye on for possible development will be circled.

If there are areas of interest, you'll find zoomed-in details in the next few images.  Otherwise, we'll provide perspective graphics on tropical cyclone climatology for the current month, as well as status updates on the season-to-date.  

 

Click Here to go to the next image of WeatherChannel.com's atlantic ocean hurricane watch analysis.

 

Tags: hurricane watch, waether channel, tropical cyclone climatology, atlantic systems, hurricane long island, hurricane damage, hurricane, hurricane new york, tropical storm, hurricane watch long island, tropical watch

Florida House OKs Alternative Hurricane Insurance

Posted on Mon, Feb 06, 2012 @ 09:17 AM

 

By BILL KACZOR | February 6, 2012

Claims Journal

hurricane,insurance,hurricane insurance,long island,new york,long island hurricane,Legislation designed to help state-backed Citizens Property Insurance Co. spin off customers to reduce its hurricane risk cleared the Florida House after a heated debate Friday.

The bill (HB 245) would let surplus lines companies, which have unregulated rates, take customers from Citizens if the firms meet certain financial requirements.

Gov. Rick Scott has taken the lead in pushing for the depopulation of Citizens. He contends its rates, limited by law, are artificially low, which could leave nearly all Floridians on the hook if a major storm hits the state.

That’s because Citizens can assess not only its own customers but those of other insurers providing a variety of coverage, including automobile policies, to make up its losses. Created to be an insurer of last resort, Citizens has become Florida’s largest property insurer with nearly 1.5 million customers as private companies have fled the state or downsized because of the hurricane threat.

The bill that passed 66-48 now goes to the Senate where similar legislation hasn’t yet had a committee hearing.

It would let Citizens automatically hand off homeowners and other customers to the surplus lines companies. Customers, however, could opt out of the switch or go back to Citizens later, the bill’s supporters said.

Opponents said customers who get switched would face higher rates and could be left holding the bag if their insurer becomes insolvent and cannot cover claims. That’s because surplus lines are not included in the Florida Insurance Guaranty Association.

“Insolvencies happen. They happen all the time,” said Rep. Rick Kriseman, a St. Petersburg Democrat who opposed the bill.

Kriseman said the guaranty association has paid out $24.2 billion for claims against more than 600 insolvent insurers.

Supporters said surplus lines companies would be required to have at least $50 million in surplus funds to participate in the program and that many are owned by major insurance companies with even greater financial backing.

“They are mainstream participants in the U.S. insurance marketplace,” said Rep. Bill Hager, a Boca Raton Republican and former Iowa insurance commissioner. “They are recognized in the main as stable, good-faith operators.”

Floridians could depend on them in case the state is struck by a major hurricane such as Katrina, which devastated New Orleans, Hager said.

“Katrina’s coming,” he told his colleagues. “You’ll look good when you vote for this. Your constituents will look even better.”

Although the state Office of Insurance Regulation, or OIR, cannot regulate surplus line rates, it does oversee the companies in other ways and can kick them out of the state if they get into financial trouble, Hager said.

That argument did not sway Rep. Evan Jenne, D-Dania Beach.

“OIR stands for the ‘office of industry rubber-stamping,”’ Jenne said.

Kriseman also criticized the legislation for having an opt-out rather than an opt-in provision.

“That means we’re asking our seniors, our seasonal residents and our families, who are busy working, to hopefully receive, read and understand the notification letter and then to take the step to reject the switch if they don’t want it,” he said.

Tags: disaster, insurance, hurricane, disaster preparedness, hurricane insurance

FEMA, NOAA MARK THE BEGINNING OF NATIONAL HURRICANE PREPAREDNESS WEEK

Posted on Mon, May 23, 2011 @ 11:48 AM

 

describe the image

WASHINGTON -- The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) are partnering once again to get the message out about the importance of preparedness for hurricanes and other possible disasters. FEMA is aggressively preparing for the upcoming hurricane season and has been working closely with other federal, state, local, and tribal partners, the private sector, faith-based and voluntary organizations, and most importantly, the public, to get ready.

President Obama recently designated May 22-28, 2011, as National Hurricane Preparedness Week, and called upon all Americans, especially those in hurricane prone areas as well as inland areas, to learn more about how to protect themselves against hurricanes and to work together, as a whole community, to respond to and recover from them. The Atlantic and Central Pacific Hurricane Season runs from June 1-November 30. The Eastern Pacific Hurricane Season began on May 15.

FEMA continues to work with state, local, tribal, federal and private sector partners to increase preparedness and coordinate response and recovery in the case of a hurricane or other disaster. FEMA also urges Americans to use this week as an annual reminder to assess their personal readiness to respond to emergencies. Our team can only be as prepared as the public is prepared, which is why it's important that people living in hurricane-prone areas take steps to prepare and protect their family. 

"We never know where the next hurricane or disaster will strike, but what we do know is that being prepared can make a world of difference, for individuals and their larger communities," said FEMA Administrator Craig Fugate. "In hurricane prone areas as well as inland areas, we urge the entire community to prepare now. There are a number of steps individuals, families, communities, churches and businesses can take to better protect themselves against hurricanes and other disasters."

"Having a personal hurricane plan is not just for those living along the coast. Inland areas are just as vulnerable to the effects from hurricanes, including damaging winds, tornadoes, and especially, flooding," said Bill Read, director, NOAA's National Hurricane Center.

Throughout the entire hurricane season it is important to know the risk for the area in which you are in and to stay informed of the latest weather information. Having a battery-powered radio, like a NOAA Weather Radio is a critical first step.  Also, everyone, including those living well inland, should be prepared by checking personal preparations such as emergency kit supplies and knowing emergency evacuation routes. More information on how we can all be prepared for this hurricane season can be found by visiting www.Ready.gov/hurricanes

 

Businesses have a vital role in preparedness as well.  Putting a disaster plan in motion now will improve the likelihood that your company may recover from a disaster faster. Ready Business outlines commonsense measures business owners and managers can take to start getting ready.

For more information on how we can all be prepared for this hurricane season, visit www.Ready.gov/hurricanes

For information about the hurricane outlooks and National Hurricane Preparedness Week, visit http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/outreach/prepared_week.shtml

Click here to view the Presidential Proclamation on National Hurricane Preparedness Week.

 

FEMA's mission is to support our citizens and first responders to ensure that as a nation we work together to build, sustain, and improve our capability to prepare for, protect against, respond to, recover from, and mitigate all hazards.

Tags: national hurricane preparedness week, hurricane damage long island, 2011 hurricane season, FEMA, hurricane, noaa, storms

2011 Atlantic Hurricane Season

Posted on Fri, Apr 01, 2011 @ 09:58 AM

2011 atlantic hurricane season

AccuWeather.com Hurricane Center meteorologists, led by Meteorologist and Hurricane Forecaster Paul Pastelok, are predicting an active season for 2011 with more impact on the U.S. coastline than last year.

The team is forecasting a total of 15 named tropical storms, eight of which will attain hurricane status and three of which will attain major hurricane status (Category 3 or higher).

In a normal year, there are 10 tropical storms, six of which become hurricanes and two of which become major hurricanes, or attain winds that exceed 110 mph.

2010's historic season had a total of 19 named storms and ranks as the third most active season on record, but there was little impact on the United States coastline. Twelve of these storms became hurricanes, five of which were major hurricanes. Two names from the 2010 season were retired on March 16.

"It looks like we're going to have more impact on the mainland of the U.S. coming up this year compared to last year," Pastelok said. "We had a lot of storms last year, but not a lot of impact [on the U.S.]."

In order to project the number of storms and impacts, the team looks at past years that have similar weather variables and patterns that closely resemble the most recent fall, winter and early spring months.

This Season's Concern Areas

As with most Atlantic hurricane seasons, the areas where storms are most likely to make landfall shift as the season progresses.

This year, the early season threat area will be the western Gulf of Mexico and the southern portion of the Caribbean. Within this zone, the higher concern for landfalls will be along the Texas and Louisiana coastlines.

As for the mid-to-late season zones, the eastern Gulf and Caribbean will be the focus. The higher concern areas will be the Florida Peninsula to the Carolinas.

"What we see is there is a clustering of storm impacts over the southeastern US, and that's the reason why we earmarked this as a concern area," said Kottlowski.

Another mid-to-late season concern for landfalls will be northern New England and the Canadian Maritimes.

"We feel that this season, there will be a higher potential for impacts across the southern part of the Basin into the Gulf of Mexico during the first part of the season," Pastelok stated. "This higher potential for impacts shift farther north into the southeast U.S. during the latter half of the season."

Hurricane season officially begins June 1 and ends Nov. 30.

For all the latest tropical information, be sure to check the AccuWeather.com Hurricane Center for the most up-to-date videos, information and storm tracks.

Article Source: Accuweather.com
By Gina Cherundolo, AccuWeather.com

Tags: disaster, floods, flooding, long island hurricane season, hurricane damage long island, property damage long island, 2011 hurricane season, long island water damage, disaster restoration, long island huricane, catastrophe, water removal long island, hurricane, long island after the storms, accuweather forecast

When Hurricanes Strike Suffolk County, NY...Code RED is Ready!

Posted on Thu, Sep 02, 2010 @ 08:25 AM

describe the image

The Suffolk County Department of Fire Rescue and Emergency Services has contracted with Emergency Communications Network to license its CodeRED high-speed notification system. Suffolk will use this system to contact Suffolk Residence in the event of an actual or impending emergency, like Hurricane Earl.   
   
The CodeRED emergency notification system is an extremely high speed telephone communication service that can deliver customized pre-recorded emergency messages directly to SuffolkCounty homes and business at the proven capacity of millions of calls per day. Code Red also has high speed email and text messaging capability

The CodeRED system incorporates a mapping tool that will allow Suffolk Emergency Managers to send notifications to specific geographic areas by selecting them on a map. In addition with CodeRED we will be able to send notifications to predefined geographic areas such as villages, townships or zip codes.
 

CodeRED has provided SuffolkCounty with a calling data base that includes the residences and businesses within the county. To further enhance accuracy SuffolkCounty has supplemented this database with the data from our 911 call system. In addition the Suffolk Code Red system allows Suffolk residence to register two phone numbers and one email address to receive notifications. We urge all individuals and businesses to log onto the secure Suffolk County Community Notification Enrolment to add or update their contact information to ensure that they will be included when a message is sent.  The data collected will only be used for emergency notification purposes.

Click the link below to Sign Up to Receive Emergency Notifications  from the Suffolk County Code Red Emergency Notifcataion System: 
https://login.coderedweb.com/codereddataentry/Default.aspx?groupid=%2baCHAGsI63WWVa6aL1efKg%3d%3d

For more information on CODE RED, visit Suffolk County's Emergency Mangement CODE RED page.  

Tags: disaster, earl, long island hurricane season, restoration, storm damage, storm, hurricane, emergency preparedness, suffolk county code red, emergency notifications, suffolk county emergency management

Hurricane Alerts: Watch vs. Warning...Know the Difference

Posted on Tue, Aug 31, 2010 @ 11:37 AM

hurricane earl

Hurricane Earl, the second major hurricane of 2010, is moving away from the Northern Leeward Islands.  Residents along the U.S. East Coast should follow Earl closely to see what impacts the hurricane will bring Thursday and Friday.  Long Island may be impacted by Earl and current weather conditions call for a 30-40% chance that Suffolk County will face a Tropical Storm come this Friday, September 3rd. 

What is the differnece between Watches and Warnings? 

  • TROPICAL STORM WATCH: An announcement that tropical storm conditions (sustained winds of 39 to 73 mph) are
possible within the specified coastal area within 48 hours.
  • TROPICAL STORM WARNING: An announcement that tropical storm conditions (sustained winds of 39 to 73 mph) are expected somewhere within the specified coastal area within 36 hours.
  • HURRICANE WATCH: An announcement that hurricane conditions (sustained winds of 74 mph or higher) are possible within the specified coastal area. Because hurricane preparedness activities become difficult once winds reach tropical storm force, the hurricane watch is issued 48 hours in advance of the anticipated onset of tropical-storm-force winds.
  • HURRICANE WARNING: An announcement that hurricane conditions (sustained winds of 74 mph or higher) are expected somewhere within the specified coastal area. Because hurricane preparedness activities become difficult once winds reach tropical storm force, the hurricane warning is issued 36 hours in advance of the anticipated onset of tropical-storm-force winds.
  • For more information on hurricanes and emergency preparedness, please click here.

     

    Tags: disaster, hurricane tips, water damage long island, earl, hurricane damage long island, advanced restoration corporation, 2010 Hurricane Season, hurricanes long island, hurricane long island, hurricane damage, hurricane damage cleanup, catastrophe, storm, hurricane, storm 2010, water removal, hurricane earl hits long island, emergency preparedness

    NOAA Expects Busy Atlantic Hurricane Season

    Posted on Tue, Jun 01, 2010 @ 04:32 PM

    hurricane

    An "active to extremely active" hurricane season is expected for the Atlantic Basin this year according to the seasonal outlook issued today by NOAA's Climate Prediction Center - a division of the National Weather Service. As with every hurricane season, this outlook underscores the importance of having a hurricane preparedness plan in place.

    Across the entire Atlantic Basin for the six-month season, which begins June 1, NOAA is projecting a 70 percent probability of the following ranges:

    • 14 to 23 Named Storms (top winds of 39 mph or higher), including:
    • 8 to 14 Hurricanes (top winds of 74 mph or higher), of which:
    • 3 to 7 could be Major Hurricanes (Category 3, 4 or 5; winds of at least 111 mph)

    "If this outlook holds true, this season could be one of the more active on record," said Jane Lubchenco, Ph.D., under secretary of commerce for oceans and atmosphere and NOAA administrator. "The greater likelihood of storms brings an increased risk of a landfall. In short, we urge everyone to be prepared."

    The outlook ranges exceed the seasonal average of 11 named storms, six hurricanes and two major hurricanes. Expected factors supporting this outlook are:

    • Upper atmospheric winds conducive for storms. Wind shear, which can tear apart storms, will be weaker since El Niño in the eastern Pacific has dissipated. Strong wind shear helped suppress storm development during the 2009 hurricane season.
    • Warm Atlantic Ocean water. Sea surface temperatures are expected to remain above average where storms often develop and move across the Atlantic. Record warm temperatures - up to four degrees Fahrenheit above average - are now present in this region.
    • High activity era continues. Since 1995, the tropical multi-decadal signal has brought favorable ocean and atmospheric conditions in sync, leading to more active hurricane seasons. Eight of the last 15 seasons rank in the top ten for the most named storms with 2005 in first place with 28 named storms.

    "The main uncertainty in this outlook is how much above normal the season will be. Whether or not we approach the high end of the predicted ranges depends partly on whether or not La Niña develops this summer," said Gerry Bell, Ph.D., lead seasonal hurricane forecaster at NOAA's Climate Prediction Center. "At present we are in a neutral state, but conditions are becoming increasingly favorable for La Niña to develop."

    "FEMA is working across the administration and with our state and local partners to ensure we're prepared for hurricane season," said FEMA Administrator Craig Fugate. "But we can only be as prepared as the public, so it's important that families and businesses in coastal communities take steps now to be ready. These include developing a communications plan, putting together a kit, and staying informed of the latest forecasts and local emergency plans. You can't control when a hurricane or other emergency may happen, but you can make sure you're ready."

    The president recently designated May 23-29, 2010, as National Hurricane Preparedness Week. NOAA and FEMA encourage those living in hurricane-prone states to use this time to review their overall preparedness. More information on individual and family preparedness can be found at http://www.ready.gov/ and http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/HAW2/english/intro.shtml.

    NOAA scientists will continue to monitor evolving conditions in the tropics and will issue an updated hurricane outlook in early August, just prior to what is historically the peak period for hurricane activity.

    NOAA's mission is to understand and predict changes in the Earth's environment, from the depths of the ocean to the surface of the sun, and to conserve and manage our coastal and marine resources. Visit NOAA on Facebook.

    Article Source: NOAA

    Tags: wind damage, property damage, water damage restoration, hurricane damage long island, disaster kleenup interntional, restoration company, disrepair, disaster restoration, 2010 Hurricane Season, hurricanes long island, hurricane long island, hurricane damage, hurricane damage cleanup, hurricane, flooded basements long island

    Catastrophe Experts Call for Quick Action on Catastrophe Protection

    Posted on Wed, Mar 10, 2010 @ 04:12 PM

    Former FEMA Director: The status quo is not acceptable

    WASHINGTON, March 10 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- James Lee Witt, the former Director of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and the current co-chair of ProtectingAmerica.org today urged a subcommittee to the House Financial Services Committee to move quickly to enact legislation that would help American families and communities be better prepared for and protected from the devastation caused by massive natural catastrophes such as earthquakes and hurricanes.

    "A catastrophic event, whether an earthquake striking one of our great American cities, or a massive hurricane making landfall near any of the metropolitan areas from New York to Houston, would cause such enormous damage that our economy would be stunned, private resources quickly depleted, and an immediate federal bailout of hundreds of billions of dollars could potentially be required," Mr. Witt stated.  

    "The American public has lost its appetite for bailouts.  Clearly the nation, our families and our communities would be better served by a program that uses private insurer dollars to pre-fund coverage for the eventuality of the next massive hurricane or devastating earthquake," Witt said. "There is no place in the country that is immune from catastrophic natural events, and the stakes are higher than ever.  Major cities along the coasts, and throughout the West and Midwest, are threatened by devastating earthquakes or hurricanes.  The human, physical and economic toll that such events would take would be unfathomable," he said.

    "To put it simply, the status quo is not acceptable.  There is an urgent need for a comprehensive and integrated program that strengthens America's financial infrastructure, improves mitigation and readiness to prepare and protect our families and communities before and during catastrophe, and creates a privately-funded backstop that assures that resources will be available to rebuild, repair and recover as quickly as possible," Witt said.

    Witt testified before the House of Representatives Committee on Financial Services Subcommittee on Housing and Community Opportunity and Subcommittee on Capital Markets, Insurance, and Government Sponsored Enterprises in support of HR 2555, the Homeowners' Defense Act, a bill sponsored by Rep. Ron Klein (D-FL) and more than 70 cosponsors from across the nation.

    The bill would provide more protection at lower cost for consumers and provide additional capacity and stability to the market.

    The bill would also mandate and help finance enhanced mitigation and prevention through better land use planning, establishment and enforcement of stronger building codes and better education training and equipment for first responders.  

    An earlier version of the Homeowners' Defense Act passed the House of Representatives in the last session of Congress by a bipartisan margin of 258-155.

    ProtectingAmerica.org is a non-profit organization with over 300 members including the American Red Cross, the International Association of Fire Chiefs, and other emergency responders, emergency management officials, police organizations, Allstate and State Farm Insurance, and large and small businesses.  The organization has more than 20,000 individual members.

    ProtectingAmerica.org is co-chaired by James Lee Witt, former director of the Federal Emergency Management Agency and Admiral James M. Loy, former deputy secretary of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and former commandant of the U.S. Coast Guard.  

    A Nation Exposed

    • Risk experts and modelers suggest that 57 percent of the American public resides in areas that are prone to earthquakes, hurricanes or other disasters.  
    • Twenty states, including Hawaii and every state that borders the Atlantic Ocean and Gulf of Mexico, face the threat of hurricanes every year.
    • The largest earthquake to ever rock the continental U.S. emanated from New Madrid, Missouri in 1811 and affected an area that stretched from Mississippi to Michigan, from Pennsylvania to Nebraska.
    • Eight out of the 11 most costly U.S. natural catastrophes have occurred since 2001.
    • Since 1900, 11 hurricanes have made direct hits on New England; six of them on the New York coastline.  The "Long Island Express," a massive hurricane that in 1938 made landfall in Long Island and raced through Connecticut, Rhode Island and Massachusetts, killed 700 people and left 63,000 people homeless.  If the same storm struck today, damages would exceed $100 billion according to risk modelers.

    About ProtectingAmerica.org

    ProtectingAmerica.org is a non-profit organization consisting of emergency management officials, first responders, disaster relief experts, insurers and others.  Its members include the American Red Cross and more than 300 other organizations and businesses.

    At the core of ProtectingAmerica.org's mission is the establishment of a comprehensive, integrated national catastrophe management solution that will better prepare and protect American families, communities, consumers and the American economy from catastrophe.   

    ProtectingAmerica.org is working to increase public awareness and enhance consumer education; advocate for better coordination with local, state and federal mitigation and recovery efforts, and strengthen emergency response and financial mechanisms to rebuild after a major catastrophe.

    The organization supports comprehensive federal legislation that would establish a privately financed national catastrophe fund that would serve as a backstop to state catastrophe funds.  The funds' private deposits and the majority of its earnings could only be used to cover replacement and rebuilding costs following major catastrophic events.  A portion of the funds' earnings would be dedicated to increase public and consumer education, strengthen first responders, and enhance building codes and their enforcement.

     

    SOURCE ProtectingAmerica.org

    Tags: emergency response, property damage, ny water damage company, nassau county restoration, dki, environmental, first responder, restoration, suffolk county restoration, home repair, catastrophe, hurricane, mitigation, ny, earthquake

    Insurance Journal