Property Damage & Disaster Restoration Blog: Long Island & New York City

New York: Being Prepared for the Unexpected!

Posted on Thu, Feb 25, 2010 @ 02:52 PM


Emergency Preparedness 
Emergency preparedness is no longer the sole concern of earthquake prone Californians and those who live in the part of the country known as "Tornado Alley." For Americans, preparedness must now account for man-made disasters as well as natural ones. Knowing what to do during an emergency is an important part of being prepared and may make all the difference when seconds count.  Heavy snow is expected to hit the Northeast today. 

Blizzards, heavy snow, freezing rain and sub-zero temperatures hit hard and frequently across the state. Even if you think you are safe and warm at home, a winter storm can become dangerous if the power is cut off. With a little planning, you can protect yourself and your family from the many hazards of winter weather, both at home and on the road.

BE AWARE OF THE FORECAST

  • Winter weather advisory. Formerly called a "travelers' advisory," this alert may be issued by the National Weather Service for a variety of severe conditions. Weather advisories may be announced for snow, blowing and drifting snow, freezing drizzle, freezing rain (when less than ice storm conditions are expected), or a combination of weather events.
  • Winter storm watch. Severe winter weather conditions may affect your area (freezing rain, sleet or heavy snow may occur either separately or in combination).
  • Winter storm warning. Severe winter weather conditions are imminent.
  • Freezing rain or freezing drizzle. Rain or drizzle is likely to freeze upon impact, resulting in a coating of ice glaze on roads and all other exposed objects.
  • Sleet. Small particles of ice, usually mixed with rain. If enough sleet accumulates on the ground, it makes travel hazardous.
  • Blizzard warning. Sustained wind speeds of at least 35 miles per hour are accompanied by considerable falling and/or blowing snow. This is the most perilous winter storm, with visibility dangerously restricted.
  • Wind chill. A strong wind combined with a temperature slightly below freezing can have the same chilling effect as a temperature nearly 50 degrees lower in a calm atmosphere. The combined cooling power of the wind and temperature on exposed flesh is called the wind-chill factor.

BE PREPARED AT HOME

  • Keep a battery-powered radio and flashlights in working order; stock extra batteries.
  • Store food that can be prepared without an electric or gas stove.
  • Stock emergency water and cooking supplies.
  • Have candles and matches available in case of a power outage.
  • Have sufficient heating fuel; regular fuel sources may be cut off.
  • Have some kind of emergency heating equipment and fuel (a kerosene heater, a gas fireplace or wood-burning stove or fireplace) so you can keep at least one room of your house warm if power is cut off. (See the fact sheet "Staying Warm in an Unheated House.")

RIDING OUT A STORM AT HOME

If you are isolated at home, listen to the radio or television for updates on weather conditions. Conserve fuel by keeping your house cooler than usual and by temporarily "closing off" heat to some rooms. When emergency heating methods must be used, maintain adequate ventilation to avoid build-up of toxic fumes. (See the fact sheet, "Staying Warm in an Unheated House.")

Dress accordingly. Layer your clothing; many layers of thin clothing are warmer than single layers of thick clothing. If you need to go outdoors or the heat is off indoors, wear mittens; they are warmer than gloves. Wear a hat; most body heat is lost through the top of the head. Cover your mouth with scarves to protect your lungs from directly inhaling extremely cold air.

If shoveling snow isn't critical, don't do it. If you must shovel snow, take your time and lift small amounts. Over-exertion can bring on a heart attack - a major cause of death during and after winter storms.

Stay safe and stay warm!

Related Article:  Ice Dams and Your Home

Source: NASD

Tags: disaster, long island, water damage, structural drying, flooding, nassau county restoration, snow, winter storm, ice damage, advanced restoration, long island water damage, restoration, homeowner tips, flood, moisture, storm damage, storm, frozen pipes, nor'easter, ice storm

Ice Dams and Your Home

Posted on Fri, Jan 22, 2010 @ 10:19 AM

Whenever there is snow, you are likely to have troublesome ice dams to follow. Ice dams can cause major water damage and flooding to your home, which requires immediate attention.

 

ice dams


 

 

As winter advances through cycles of freezing and thawing, buildings and homes experience ice buildup and roof damage. In general, ice dams are formed when attic heat moves up to warm the roof and melts snow at or near the ridge. Snow melts, runs downward and hits the edge of the cold roof, resulting in re-freezing snow.  These cycles cause ice to accumulate and back up under shingles. Damage appears in the form of soaked insulation, stained, cracked and damaged sheet rock, damp, smelly, rotting wall cavities and stained, blistered and peeling paint.

Preventing Ice Dams
To prevent an ice dam, don't heat the roof, keep it cold. That way, the snow on the roof eventually dissipates without making large amounts of meltwater. The underside of the roof deck should not exceed 30 F. The best way to maintain low temperatures is by ensuring that there is adequate insulation and sealing gaps that let warm air pass into the attic from the house. The attic must also be ventilated, so that cold air is introduced into it and heated air escapes rapidly.  InsulationIncreased insulation in an attic will help to prevent ice dams. First, insulate the areas between the roof rafters. It is important to keep an air space between the roof deck and the insulation in order to prevent a condensation buildup that can delaminate the roof deck. Prior to insulating, install polystyrene rafter air channels, which are available at home centers.  If there's a hatchway into the attic, build a cover for it out of rigid poly-styrene insulation.

If the gable and ridge vents do not generate sufficient air movement to dissipate the heat, you will need a motorized vent at one end of the attic to exhaust the heat, and an adequately sized vent on the opposite end of the attic to draw in cold air from the outside.

Ice Dam Inspection
Check your home carefully when ice dams form. Investigate even when there doesn't appear to be a leak. Look at the underside of the roof sheathing and roof trim to make sure they haven't gotten wet. Check the insulation for dampness. And when leaks inside your home develop, be prepared. Water penetration often follows pathways difficult follow.  Don't just patch the roof leak. Make sure that the roof sheathing hasn't rotted or that other less obvious problems in your ceiling or walls haven't developed. Detail a comprehensive plan to fix the damage and more importantly, solve the problem.

Frozen Pipes?

frozen pipes

 

Tags: preventing frozen pipes, ny water damage company, restoration companies, flooding, nassau county restoration, demolition waste, winter storm, ice damage, cold winter, advanced restoration, restoration, emergency service, disrepair, flood damage, flood, home repair, moisture, ice storm

Ice Dams and Protecting Your Home!

Posted on Wed, Jan 06, 2010 @ 08:11 PM
As if we need more snow, another storm is expected on Friday. Whenever there is snow, you are guaranteed to have troublesome ice dams to follow. Ice dams can cause major water damage and flooding to your home, which requires immediate attention.
ice dams, water damage,water extraction
As winter advances through cycles of freezing and thawing, buildings and homes experience ice buildup and roof damage. In general, ice dams are formed when attic heat moves up to warm the roof and melts snow at or near the ridge. Snow melts, runs downward and hits the edge of the cold roof, resulting in re-freezing snow. These cycles cause ice to accumulate and back up under shingles. Damage appears in the form of soaked insulation, stained, cracked and damaged sheet rock, damp, smelly, rotting wall cavities and stained, blistered and peeling paint.

Preventing Ice Dams
To prevent an ice dam, don't heat the roof, keep it cold. That way, the snow on the roof eventually dissipates without making large amounts of meltwater. The underside of the roof deck should not exceed 30 F. The best way to maintain low temperatures is by ensuring that there is adequate insulation and sealing gaps that let warm air pass into the attic from the house. The attic must also be ventilated, so that cold air is introduced into it and heated air escapes rapidly. Some remodeling contractors are under the impression that heat passing through the attic helps prevent ice dams, when just the opposite is true. Although excess heat moving from the attic through the roof rapidly melts snow, once the meltwater touches the cold eaves, it quickly freezes and forms an ice dam.

If you have a furnace in the attic, it may not be possible to prevent ice dams. Increased insulation, however, should help. First, insulate the areas between the roof rafters. It is important to keep an air space between the roof deck and the insulation in order to prevent a condensation buildup that can delaminate the roof deck. Prior to insulating, install polystyrene rafter air channels, which are available at home centers. Next, lay insulation blankets over the furnace's heating ducts to help reduce the heat buildup in the attic. If there's a hatchway into the attic, build a cover for it out of rigid poly-styrene insulation.

If the gable and ridge vents do not generate sufficient air movement to dissipate the heat, you will need a motorized vent at one end of the attic to exhaust the heat, and an adequately sized vent on the opposite end of the attic to draw in cold air from the outside.

Check your home carefully when ice dams form. Investigate even when there doesn't appear to be a leak. Look at the underside of the roof sheathing and roof trim to make sure they haven't gotten wet. Check the insulation for dampness. And when leaks inside your home develop, be prepared. Water penetration often follows pathways difficult follow. Don't just patch the roof leak. Make sure that the roof sheathing hasn't rotted or that other less obvious problems in your ceiling or walls haven't developed. And then detail a comprehensive plan to fix the damage. But more importantly, solve the problem.

If you experience water damage that requires a water damage/flood restoration expert, please contact Advanced Restoration at (800) 693-6263. Advanced Restoration is a full service property damage restoration company that can respond 24/7 to your water damage situation. We use state-of-the-art equipment to handle structural drying. Our professional staff is also available to handle mold situations that may occur as a result of a water loss. Our service area includes Nassau County, Suffolk County and the New York boroughs. Enjoy the snowfall and stay dry!

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Flooding/Water Damage Restoration

Posted on Sun, Jan 25, 2009 @ 05:24 PM



Do You Have Flooding/Water Damage in Your Home, Office or Business?

When a pipe bursts, the damage to your home or business can be devastating. Knowing who to call for this type of situation is essential to ensure emergency water mitigation efforts are handled timely and properly by trained experts.

If you had recent storm or water damage from frozen pipes, one call to Advanced Restoration will ensure your property structure is mitigated properly. Our professional staff is ready to provide you 24/7 Emergency Service throughout the New York Metro area!

Reduce your claim costs by hundreds, even thousands of $$$. Our equipment allows us to dry wet hardwood floors (or any hardsurface floor) by using our Injectidry Systems. Injectidry's Vac-It Panels are placed directly over the wet area and the system (HP60) pulls the water out of the wood or hardsurface!

Injectidry's High Pressure drying systems are specifically developed to target high risk areas of hidden moisture such as: walls and ceilings, double-sheeted fire walls, party walls, sound barriers, insulation, walls behind cabinets and fixtures and floors.

Benefits of Using Advanced Restoration and Injectidry Technology

  • In most cases, the floors will dry beneath refrigerators and stoves without moving appliances.
    Many of the floors do not even need to be refinished.
  • Floors do not sit wet and cupped for 3-9 months while nails rust and mold grows underneath.
    Continue to use the premise (home, office, business) during the drying process.
  • Reduced claim costs.

Advanced Restoration is available for all your property restoration and reconstruction needs.

Our staff is truly committed to Making Disaster Temporary and Restoration Permanent!

Tags: property damage, ny water damage company, water damage, water damage restoration, nassau county restoration, ice damage, advanced restoration, long island water damage, suffolk county restoration, water extraction, emergency service, restoration company, flood damage, flood, home repair, moisture, water leaks, frozen pipes

Ice Storm: NY State Insurance Dept. Activates Disaster Hotline

Posted on Tue, Dec 16, 2008 @ 05:38 PM

The New York State Insurance Department just sent out a news release related its Disaster Hotline, which was activated due to an ice storm that hit multiple counties in upstate New York:

See below...

New York State
Insurance
Department
NEWS
RELEASE
Contact:
Public Affairs
(212) 480-5262

www.ins.state.ny.us

Eric R. Dinallo Superintendent of Insurance 25 Beaver Street New York, N.Y. 10004
ISSUED 12/15/2008
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

INSURANCE DEPARTMENT ACTIVATES DISASTER HOTLINE
The New York State Insurance Department today activated its toll-free Disaster Hotline to assist property owners affected by the ice storm that struck 16 Upstate counties and left thousands of New Yorkers without power, Superintendent Eric Dinallo said.
The Insurance Department's Disaster Hotline number is 1-800-339-1759. The hotline is staffed by personnel from the Department's Consumer Services Bureau on weekdays between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m.

"Consumers who have storm-related damage and are having difficulty dealing with their insurance company or understanding their coverage should give the hotline a call," Dinallo said. "We are available to help New Yorkers work through the claims process with their insurance companies in the event they need help."

Dinallo urged homeowners and business operators to make every effort to protect their homes and businesses from further damage. This includes reviewing insurance policies for important information related to electric utility interruptions. Coverage for power failure is generally excluded in a homeowners policy. However, coverage may be available for damage occurring during the restoration of electricity by such events as electrical power surges.

Commercial property policies generally exclude coverage for power or utility service failure if the failure occurs outside the premises. There may also be waiting periods in policies before business interruption coverage is triggered. It is important for these property owners to confer with their insurance agent to determine the extent of coverage available.

Following are some typical questions and answers consumers may find helpful:

What damage to your home is covered?
Damage caused by wind, wind-driven rain, trees or other falling objects, as well as the collapse of a structure due to the weight of ice or snow, is covered under most standard homeowner policies. The repair of pipes frozen as the result of extreme cold weather may not be covered if damage is due to negligence, such as failing to maintain an adequate temperature in the house.

What damage to your home is not covered?
Many policies do not cover losses of any type incurred as the result of a flood, costs associated with the removal of a fallen tree (unless the tree lands on your home), food spoilage expenses created by an off-premises power outage, and water damage resulting from backed-up drains or sewers. Some insurers offer endorsements (additional protection that may be purchased) for certain coverage not included under a standard homeowner policy. Consumers should check with their insurance agent or company to determine their needs.

What should I do after damage to a car or an accident?
Damage to automobiles due to falling ice or trees is covered under your comprehensive automobile insurance policy. In the event of an accident while driving on icy roads, call your insurance agent or insurance company with your policy number and other relevant information as soon as possible, although you have 30 days in which to report the accident. Be sure you cooperate fully with the insurance company and ask your agent what documents, forms and data you will need.

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