Property Damage & Disaster Restoration Blog: Long Island & New York City

Green Building: Eco-Conscious Passive Houses Hit Brooklyn

Posted on Fri, May 04, 2012 @ 09:04 AM

New York Observer,green building,Eco-Conscious Passive Houses Aggressively Hit Brooklyn

By Kim Velsey 

The most exceptional thing about the house at 96 St. Marks Avenue is that it doesn’t look exceptional at all. It’s just another redbrick townhouse on a street chock-a-block with redbrick townhouses in a borough crammed with townhouse-lined streets.

However, the Prospect Heights house is the the city’s first multi-unit building to be built, or in this case retrofitted, to meet the über-stringent environmental standards developed by the German-based Passive House Institute (among other things, the house must maintain a comfortable indoor temperature without really using active heating or cooling systems, reducing the house’s energy consumption by 90 percent).

Having never seen a passive house before, The Observer expected at least some clunky sign of the building’s conversion when we visited the still under-construction home a few weeks ago. But, no. No weird metal ducts or shiny solar panels. Did the future of green building really look so much like the past?

Well, yes, developer Brendan Aguayo said, which was kind of the beauty of the whole concept. Any house can be built as a passive house, and any house can become a passive house. (No geodesic dome was this!) Passive houses are all a matter of insulation and ventilation. A lot of insulation, to be fair—triple-paned windows, six inches of cellulose blown into the walls, plastic sheeting, and multiple layers of a waterproofing/air barrier compound called Sto Gold painted on the walls—but still, nothing super fancy or particularly newfangled.

“It’s basically good building practices done to the extreme,” said Mr. Aguayo, who gave TheObserver a sneak-peak of the soon-to-hit-the-market condos (the building will have three two-bedroom units measuring 825-square-feet and a 1,400-square foot duplex on the first floor).

The general principle behind passive is to make the building airtight—”a bubble, or a thermos,” as Mr. Aguayo put it—with a ventilation system constantly filtering the home’s air, passing fresh air through heat trapped in the kitchens and bathrooms.

“Some people have this misconception—‘I can’t open a window’ or ‘I’m going to die of CO2 poisoning,’” Mr. Aguayo said, unlatching one of the windows with a chuckle. Besides windows that open, the house also has heaters and air conditions (even if residents aren’t really expected to need them) and fireplaces? in every unit.

What charming relics of the home’s former heating technologies, we mused. Were they functional?

Wrong on both counts. They were, in fact, brand new faux fireplaces.

“I liked the idea of it—something different to look at,” said Mr. Aguayo. He shrugged. “I guess we’re letting them know that they never need to use a fireplace.”

Basically, the only thing you won’t see in a passive house is exposed brick. (“Very, very cold, you’re going to lose a lot of energy that way,” said Mr. Aguayo, confirming what we know to be true from visits to many hip but chilly apartments).

The Passivhaus Institut, which administers the passive house standard, estimates that there are about 32,000 passive houses worldwide. They have become increasingly popular in Europe but are still something of a rarity in the U.S., with less than 20 houses certified, and only a handful in New York.

Inside 96 St. Marks, workers were coming to the end of a year-long retrofit, painting and sanding. Each unit had white walls, wooden floors, high ceilings,  generous windows, expensive-looking coppery bathroom fixtures and peek-a-boo style flaps and doors that revealed glimpses of the labyrinth of ventilation ducts running through the house (the ventilation system has several settings, including “boost” mode for events like parties, which can become stuffy in a sealed house).

Although Mr. Aguayo has long been involved with construction projects through his family’s business, 96 St. Marks is his first as developer (he’s working with development partner Martin Handler). It’s also his first passive house.

“I got this building at a price I felt comfortable doing a trial run with passive,” said Mr. Aguayo. Purchased for a little under $1 million, he estimated that gut renovating the building as a passive house has cost about 10 percent more than a normal gut renovation (The windows are one of the most expensive items. Mr. Aguayo said that the windows for 96 St. Marks cost $60,000, whereas fairly high-end windows on a normal conversion would have cost about $18,000). Pricing on the units has yet to be determined, but Mr. Aguayo said that he’s had a lot of interest.

“And even if someone hated passive houses, at least they get a nice condo in a good location.”

Mr. Aguayo admitted that the first retrofit process had involved something of a steep learning curve—sealing up the home’s air barrier is particularly vexing—but he’s already planning a new passive project in Park Slope. Given the neighborhood’s history of lifestyle one-upmanship, it’s hard to see how such a project would be anything but wildly popular.

On the next project he’ll also have a connection for hard-to-find construction materials.  Ken Levenson, the architect on the 96 St. Marks renovation, is so enthusiastic that he’s now remaking himself as an importer of specialty passive house construction materials.

“People are already realizing technology has been proved in Europe and it has a track record so we’re not reinventing the wheel,” Mr. Levenson said in a phone interview with the Observer. It’s a low risk proposition once the clients think through it, that they come to the realization that it would be kind of crazy not to do. You’re either going to be one of the first houses of the future or one last houses of the past.”

But what is it actually like to live in a passive house? Does one miss drafty corridors or clanking radiators?

“Not at all” said Elsie Kagan who renovated a Park Slope rowhouse to passive house standards a few years ago. It didn’t quite pass the test, but Ms. Kagan and her husband aren’t terribly upset. Their house is still incredibly efficient and they were spending less on heating and cooling than they spent on the electric bill at their old place.

“The weird thing about the house is you don’t notice it most of the time,” said Ms. Kagan. “The only difference is that it’s very quiet. We don’t hear almost any street noise. Suddenly we’ll have the window open and we’ll think ‘Why can we hear everything all of a sudden?’”

She paused, seeing if any other differences leaped to mind. She came up short.

“We blend in, we totally blend. We just have a little thicker walls and windows.”

[email protected]

 

Tags: green building, brooklyn, retrofitted, new york, eco-concsious, passive house

New York Gov. Cuomo Announces Storm Aid for Long Island

Posted on Wed, May 02, 2012 @ 09:59 AM

insurance journal,insurance,long island,new york,storm damage,storm aid,long island insurance,propwerty damage,advanced restoration,risk

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said the state is providing $8.5 million to Nassau and Suffolk counties on Long Island. The money will be used to pay expenses from damage done last year by Hurricane Irene and Tropical Storm Lee.

The storms caused widespread destruction across the state. Cleanup costs statewide are expected to exceed $1.6 billion.

The Federal Emergency Management Agency usually covers 75 percent of eligible disaster response and recovery costs.

Earlier this month, Cuomo announced the state would pay $61 million to 25 counties to cover costs for emergency shelter, road, water system and infrastructure repairs and other clean-up projects. Cuomo added $8.5 million for Nassau and Suffolk counties last week. 

Article Taken from the Insurance Journal

Copyright 2012 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Tags: insurance journal, storm aid, long island, property damage, insurance, new york, storm damage, long island insurance

Indoor Air Quality (IAQ): Best Apps for Seasonal Allergy

Posted on Wed, Apr 25, 2012 @ 04:28 PM

With April showers, come May flowers and for many, May flowers also come with itchy eyes, runny noses, sneezing, and general pollen-induced misery. Seasonal allergies are on the way, like it or not.

So, if you see the beautiful sights of spring through watery eyes, then these five mobile apps will help you better prepare for the upcoming season.

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Tags: allergy, doctor, application, android app, long island, new york, indoor air quality, iaq, seasonal allergies, allergies, pollen, android, app, apple, apple app store

Risk Management, Modeling Helped Reinsurance Industry in 2011

Posted on Tue, Apr 24, 2012 @ 11:59 AM

business insurance,risk management,insurance,long island insurance,reinsurance,new york insurance,long island insurance agentIncreasingly sophisticated risk management and modeling techniques helped the reinsurance sector weather near-record catastrophe losses in 2011, according to a report released Monday by Oldwick, N.J.-based A.M. Best Co.

The “Global Reinsurance Financial Review” notes that while the numerous loss events of 2011 cost the insurance industry approximately $110 billion in losses, the reinsurance market has seen only a minimal squeeze on capacity.

“It is reasonable to ask why the market did not turn more broadly, considering all that 2011 offered: significant catastrophe losses, record low investment yields, uncertain financial markets and the downgrade of U.S. sovereign debt,” the report states. “The simple answer is that reinsurance capacity remained ample despite the magnitude of losses and unrelenting headwinds.”

Several factors cited

The report credits several factors to this resilience. One factor is a continuing evolution in enterprise risk management. The industry invested heavily in ERM initiatives in the wake of Hurricanes Katrina, Rita and Wilma in 2005, the report states.

Another factor helping the industry has been advances in catastrophe and economic capital models. A.M. Best said. “These tools significantly helped a reinsurer's ability to better allocate capital within complex risk portfolios,” the report states. “The models, while not perfect, helped keep both individual and cumulative losses in 2011 within stated risk tolerances for most of the global reinsurers.”

Additionally, reinsurers have adopted conservative capital management strategies in response to new pressures coming from regulators and rating agencies.

Increasingly sophisticated risk management and modeling techniques helped the reinsurance sector weather near-record catastrophe losses in 2011, according to a report released Monday by Oldwick, N.J.-based A.M. Best Co.

The “Global Reinsurance Financial Review” notes that while the numerous loss events of 2011 cost the insurance industry approximately $110 billion in losses, the reinsurance market has seen only a minimal squeeze on capacity.“It is reasonable to ask why the market did not turn more broadly, considering all that 2011 offered: significant...

Bill Kenealy

Article originally published on BusinessInsurance.com

                                   April 23, 2012 - 1:42pm

 

Tags: long island, business insurance, risk managemetn, insurance, new york, insurance agent, reinsurance

Footing the Bill for MF Global’s Lawyers

Posted on Fri, Apr 13, 2012 @ 10:23 AM

 

BY PETER J. HENNING

New York Times 

From left, Edith O'Brien, Henri Steenkamp, Christine Serwinski and Laurie Ferber of MF Global at a House panel in March.Jay Mallin/Bloomberg NewsFrom left, Edith O’Brien, Henri Steenkamp, Christine Serwinski and Laurie Ferber of MF Global at a House panel in March.

When four top MF Global executives testified before a Congressional subcommittee on March 28 about how $1.6 billion in customer money went missing during the firm’s final days, they were accompanied by teams of lawyers. Care to guess who is paying for all that legal firepower?

As unfair as it may seem, it is the company insurance that pays, even in bankruptcy.

As virtually every large company does, MF Global bought insurance to pay for the expenses its employees might incur if they were investigated and found liable for actions taken while working for the firm. It had two policies in place at the time of its collapse into bankruptcy on Oct. 31: a “directors and officers” policy for $225 million and an “errors and omissions” policy for $150 million.

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An opinion by Judge Martin Glenn of the United States Bankruptcy Court in Manhattan issued Tuesday affirmed that insurance policies bought by MF Global can be used to help pay for the lawyers for the firm’s employees, including its chief,Jon S. Corzine. Mr. Corzine and others have been named in a host of civil lawsuits, and are having to answer to several regulators trying determine whether any wrongdoing has been committed.

The judge on Tuesday noted that the employees had spent $8.3 million on legal fees so far. He authorized payment for those fees, while imposing a “soft cap” of $30 million on such expenses, which can be increased later.

Although they covered different types of conduct, MF Global’s two policies give first priority to paying for the expenses of individual employees. These are so-called wasting policies, which means that every dollar spent on paying for lawyers for the employees is one less dollar that would be available to pay a claim.

The commodity customers who lost $1.6 billion from their MF Global accounts filed a challenge in the bankruptcy court over whether the insurance policies could be tapped by the employees to pay for their lawyers. They argued that the proceeds of the insurance should be used to pay off their claims rather than going to the employees’ lawyers.

Another group involved in the case are the plaintiffs in a securities class action filed against MF Global and its officers who claim that they were defrauded by misleading statements about the company’s liquidity and internal financial controls.

Unlike the commodities customers, MF Global stockholders favored finding that the insurance policies should go to cover the expenses of the company’s officers because that would provide a larger pool of money to settle the securities case. The policies cover both legal fees and any payments made to settle claims over legal violations.

The bankruptcy trustee for MF Global, the former F.B.I. directorLouis J. Freeh, also supported the move to have the legal fees to be paid from the insurance policies. MF Global agreed to indemnify its employees for any expenses they incurred related to conduct at the firm, so having the insurers pay for the legal fees means fewer claims against the company’s remaining assets in the bankruptcy proceeding.

Judge Glenn was aware that there was a measure of unfairness in the decision, but that denying the employees the right to have their expenses covered would also be problematic. He acknowledged that many of MF Global commodities customers have faced hardships since the bankruptcy. But he also noted that the employees covered by the insurance “would suffer significant hardships if the policies were disabled.”

Some may believe that the insurance should be tapped to compensate victims, rather than officers. But as Kevin P. LaCroixwrote on the D&O Diary blog, “liability insurance exists to protect insured persons from liability, not to create a pool of money to compensate would-be claimants.”

MF Global’s two insurance policies make payment of the legal fees the first priority, and the bankruptcy judge chose to follow the terms of insurance contract.

MF Global’s two policies cover up to $375 million in liability. That sounds like a lot for legal fees but the recent experience of former executives at Lehman Brothers shows that such costs add up quickly. Lehman had $250 million in directors and officers insurance, and that amount has been almost completely exhausted through legal fees and settlements.

The legal fees for MF Global employees could quickly rise above the $30 million “soft cap” imposed by Judge Glenn if the Justice Department or the Commodity Futures Trading Commissiondecides to pursue charges. Even if a government agency settles with potential defendants, the settlement is likely to involve penalties that would be payable from the insurance policies.

Add to that the commodity customer claims for the missing $1.6 billion, and the potential liabilities can easily exceed $375 million available from the insurers.

There is a very good chance that MF Global’s insurance will not cover all the costs that arise. So in the end, the former employees — and commodity customers — may have to bear a portion of the costs.

Tags: insurance, new york, insurance claim, insurance company, claim, fm global, new york times

Chartis Insurance Introduces CyberEdge Tower(SM)

Posted on Tue, Apr 03, 2012 @ 01:05 PM

marketwatch,insurance,chartis,chartis insurance,insurance claims,new york,claims,property claims,

NEW YORK, Apr 03, 2012 (BUSINESS WIRE) --

Chartis today introduced CyberEdge Tower(SM), an insurance solution that provides catastrophic network security and privacy protection. As companies struggle to balance self-insurance with the increased prospects of a material cyber event, CyberEdge Tower offers a compelling value proposition. It provides total aggregate limits of liability of up to $100 million that are structured to allow the insured to cost-effectively retain up to the first $50 million of loss. The solution will be delivered via the Chartis insurers’ market-leading Specialty Risk Protector® insurance policy.

With growing concern about catastrophic cyber security and privacy exposures, as well as the likelihood of increased regulation and enforcement, companies are proactively addressing cyber risk and insurance disclosures. The SEC’s recent Disclosure Guidance on Cybersecurity makes it clear that cybersecurity risks should be elevated from an IT department issue to a boardroom priority. Accordingly, companies are reconsidering whether they can, or should, retain all of the potential risk of a cyber incident.

“Before the CyberEdge Tower solution, companies with large cyber exposures had limited cost-effective options and were primarily self-insuring,” said Chandra Metzler, Product Line Executive, Chartis Financial Lines, U.S. and Canada.

CyberEdge Tower provides customers with the benefit of Chartis’ cutting-edge insurance solutions and unparalleled claims handling, while allowing companies to retain the cost advantage of funding their own losses.

Marty Scherzer, Head of Global Risk Solutions at Chartis, said, “Our new solution delivers an innovative insurance tool that can help companies better manage their cyber risks.”

For more information about this offering, please e-mail [email protected], or visit http://www.chartisinsurance.com/us/cyberedge .


About Chartis
Chartis is a world leading property-casualty and general insurance organization serving more than 70 million clients around the world. With one of the industry’s most extensive ranges of products and services, deep claims expertise and excellent financial strength, Chartis enables its commercial and personal insurance clients alike to manage virtually any risk with confidence.

Chartis is the marketing name for the worldwide property-casualty and general insurance operations of Chartis Inc.

For additional information, please visit our website at http://www.chartisinsurance.com.

All products are written by insurance company subsidiaries or affiliates of Chartis Inc. Coverage may not be available in all jurisdictions and is subject to actual policy language.

Non-insurance products and services may be provided by independent third parties. Certain coverage may be provided by a surplus lines insurer. Surplus lines insurers do not generally participate in state guaranty funds and insureds are therefore not protected by such funds.


 

Tags: chartis insurance, insurance, new york, insurance claim, insurance company, claim, chartis

Flood and homeowner's insurance are not deductible

Posted on Fri, Feb 24, 2012 @ 09:35 AM
 
 
 Q. I understand there is a tax deduction for mortgage insurance, provided that your income is less than $100,000 per year. Are flood insurance and home insurance also deductible if your income is under $100,000?

Mortgage insurance premiums paid on your personal residence or second home would be deductible as an interest deduction on Schedule A (itemized deductions) on Form 1040. The deduction phases out once your adjusted gross income (AGI) exceeds $100,000 for single and joint filers and $50,000 for married filing separately.

Flood and homeowners insurance are not deductible unless a portion of your home is used for business (for example, a two-family house). Based on the percentage of the property that is for business use, you would be allowed to deduct flood and homeowner insurance proportionately.

You must report rental income and expenses on business-use property on Schedule E of form 1040. — Eugene J. Varsalona is a certified public accountant in Little Ferry.

Q. When does it make sense for New Jersey taxpayers to do the work to amend a prior return? For example, we realized after filing for 2010 that total out-of-pocket medical expenses can possibly be deducted if they exceed more than 2 percent of adjusted gross income in New Jersey.

Individual income tax returns are amended on Form 1040X if you are amending a federal return and N.J. 1040X if you are amending a New Jersey return. According to the Internal Revenue Service, you can amend a return to correct the original return filed, make elections after the prescribed deadline, change amounts adjusted by the Internal Revenue Service or claim a carryback due to an unused credit.

Amended returns for both federal and state purposes must be filed within three years (including extensions) after the date the original return was filed or within two years after the date the taxes were paid, whichever is later.

Interest and penalties will be assessed against any balance due on the amended returns, so it is best to amend the returns as soon as an error is found.

I would recommend amending the N.J. 1040 if you determine that the out-of-pocket medical expenses exceed 2 percent of your New Jersey adjusted gross income. If you are entitled to a refund, you should claim it. — Thomas J. Braun is a certified public accountant in Park Ridge.

Tax questions? The Record's committee of local experts may be able to help. Accountants from theBergen County Chapter of the New Jersey Society of Certified Public Accountants, who are volunteering their time, will answer questions in The Record's Business section weekly until April. Email [email protected] with "Tax Mailbag" in the subject line.

Tags: long island, property damage, insurance, new york, flood insurance, insurance claim

Flood and homeowner's insurance are not deductible

Posted on Fri, Feb 24, 2012 @ 09:35 AM
 
 
 
insurance,insurance claim, flood insurance,property damage,long island,new york

Q. I understand there is a tax deduction for mortgage insurance, provided that your income is less than $100,000 per year. Are flood insurance and home insurance also deductible if your income is under $100,000?

Mortgage insurance premiums paid on your personal residence or second home would be deductible as an interest deduction on Schedule A (itemized deductions) on Form 1040. The deduction phases out once your adjusted gross income (AGI) exceeds $100,000 for single and joint filers and $50,000 for married filing separately.

Flood and homeowners insurance are not deductible unless a portion of your home is used for business (for example, a two-family house). Based on the percentage of the property that is for business use, you would be allowed to deduct flood and homeowner insurance proportionately.

You must report rental income and expenses on business-use property on Schedule E of form 1040. — Eugene J. Varsalona is a certified public accountant in Little Ferry.

Q. When does it make sense for New Jersey taxpayers to do the work to amend a prior return? For example, we realized after filing for 2010 that total out-of-pocket medical expenses can possibly be deducted if they exceed more than 2 percent of adjusted gross income in New Jersey.

Individual income tax returns are amended on Form 1040X if you are amending a federal return and N.J. 1040X if you are amending a New Jersey return. According to the Internal Revenue Service, you can amend a return to correct the original return filed, make elections after the prescribed deadline, change amounts adjusted by the Internal Revenue Service or claim a carryback due to an unused credit.

Amended returns for both federal and state purposes must be filed within three years (including extensions) after the date the original return was filed or within two years after the date the taxes were paid, whichever is later.

Interest and penalties will be assessed against any balance due on the amended returns, so it is best to amend the returns as soon as an error is found.

I would recommend amending the N.J. 1040 if you determine that the out-of-pocket medical expenses exceed 2 percent of your New Jersey adjusted gross income. If you are entitled to a refund, you should claim it. — Thomas J. Braun is a certified public accountant in Park Ridge.

Tax questions? The Record's committee of local experts may be able to help. Accountants from theBergen County Chapter of the New Jersey Society of Certified Public Accountants, who are volunteering their time, will answer questions in The Record's Business section weekly until April. Email [email protected] with "Tax Mailbag" in the subject line.

Tags: long island, property damage, insurance, new york, flood insurance, insurance claim

What is an Insurance Claim? by WiseGEEK.com

Posted on Thu, Feb 23, 2012 @ 01:32 PM

insurance, insurance claim, insurance claims,property damage,disaster,restoration,long island,new york,insurance agent,property damage claim

An insurance claim is the actual application for benefits provided by an insurance company. Policy holders must first file an insurance claim before any money can be disbursed to the hospital or repair shop or other contracted service. The insurance company may or may not approve the claim, based on their own assessment of the circumstances.

Individuals who take out home, life, health, or automobile insurance policies must maintain regular payments called premiums to the insurers. Most of the time these premiums are used to settle another person's insurance claim or to build up the available assets of the insurance company. But occasionally an accident will happen which causes real financial damage, such as a automobile wreck or a tornado or a work-related accident. At this point the injured policy holder has the right to file an insurance claim in order to receive money from the insurance company.

In general, the insurance claim is filed with a local representative of the insurance company. This agent becomes responsible for investigating the specific details of the insurance claim and negotiating the payment from the main insurers. Many times a recognized authority (doctor, repair shop, building contractor) can file the necessary insurance claim forms directly with the insurance company. However, sometimes the policy holder may not want to file an actual insurance claim if the damage is minor or another party has agreed to pay out-of-pocket for their mistake.

After an insurance claim is filed, the insurance company may send out an investigator called an adjustor or appraiser. The insurance adjustor's job is to objectively evaluate the insurance claim and determine if the repair estimates are reasonable. This is to prevent possible fraud by contractors who may inflate their bills for additional compensation. Insurance companies tend to accept the adjustor or appraiser's evaluation as the final word on the insurance claim.

Some insurance claims may not be recognized by the insurance company for any number of reasons. If a claimant's premiums have not been paid in full, the policy itself may not be active. Another insurance company may have already agreed to pay for the damages listed in the claim. This happens quite often in automobile accidents where one party is held responsible. Another reason an insurance claim may be rejected is a failure to fall under covered conditions. Most insurance policies spell out specific areas which qualify for benefits. If the accident or damage claim was caused by carelessness or an unavoidable "Act of God", the insurance company has the right to withhold payments.

An insurance claim is the only way to officially apply for benefits under an insurance policy, but until the insurance company has assessed the situation it will remain only a claim, not a pay-out.

Tags: disaster, long island, property damage, insurance claims, insurance, new york, insurance agent, insurance claim, restoration, property damage claim

Enservio Continues Growth, Acquires Insurers World

Posted on Fri, Feb 17, 2012 @ 10:54 AM

NEEDHAM, Mass.--(EON: Enhanced Online News)--Enservio (www.enservio.com), the nation’s leading provider of property insurance analytics, affinity marketing and claims solutions, today announced that the company has entered into a definitive agreement to acquire Insurers World (www.insurersworld.com) of Canton, Mass.

“Insurers World is an excellent company with strong management, great products, and similar values, and we have watched and admired them for years”

Together, Enservio and Insurers World will be able to offer property insurers a full range of solutions from strategic analytics to claims software and services nationally. As a combined entity, Enservio provides solutions to 12 of the largest property insurers in the nation, has over 300 insurer customers and over 450 employees nationally.

“Insurers World is an excellent company with strong management, great products, and similar values, and we have watched and admired them for years,” said Jon McNeill, CEO of Enservio. “This is a great day for both companies. We are thrilled to welcome Insurers World into the Enservio family. Over the years, we’ve developed a great deal of respect for the Insurers World professional team and their capabilities. This acquisition doubles the value we bring to our customers and doubles our geographic footprint in our claims services business.”

Don Stafford of Insurers World echoed the same, “We are thrilled to be joining Enservio and to benefit from their continued drive to create real innovation and efficiencies in the industry, including their enterprise Software as a Service (SaaS) platform. Together, we’ll not only provide our customers with the same unparalleled service levels, but also offer them a broader range of industry-changing solutions like the ReStoreMall and ReStoreCard.”

With this acquisition, Insurers World will retain its distinct brand identity, while strengthening and complementing Enservio. Insurers World will continue to be based in Canton, Massachusetts.

About Enservio

Enservio is the market leader in property insurance affinity solutions, strategic analytics, and contents software, inventory, valuation, replacement and replacement tools. Enservio created the first SaaS (software as a service) software platform for contents, the first replacement mall, the first payment debit card for claims and the first ContentsITV product. We provide software and services to property insurance carriers and their policy holders nationwide. Founded in 2004, we are headquartered near Boston, in Needham, MA with offices and professional staff across the United States. For additional information, please visit the company's web sitewww.enservio.com or call 888.567.7557.

About Insurers World

Since 1978, Insurers World™ has been a chosen partner of insurance companies to establish accurate LKQ and indemnity, incomparable to other industry services. Without the partnership of IW, an adjuster’s contents inventories may remain dormant while they manage more pressing tasks in their workload, returning to their contents evaluation now and again. This issue is simply resolved with the use IW’s inventory transcription and evaluation services, which proceed immediately upon claim submission, allowing the adjuster to concentrate on higher level tasks, making optimal use of their time.

Article First Appeared On EON Business Wire

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Contacts

Topaz Partners
Tom Francoeur, 781-404-2405
[email protected]

Tags: long island, insurance claims, insurance, new york, insurance claim, insurance industry, enservio, claim

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