Property Damage & Disaster Restoration Blog: Long Island & New York City

Hurricane Alerts: Watch vs. Warning...Know the Difference

Posted on Tue, Aug 31, 2010 @ 11:37 AM

hurricane earl

Hurricane Earl, the second major hurricane of 2010, is moving away from the Northern Leeward Islands.  Residents along the U.S. East Coast should follow Earl closely to see what impacts the hurricane will bring Thursday and Friday.  Long Island may be impacted by Earl and current weather conditions call for a 30-40% chance that Suffolk County will face a Tropical Storm come this Friday, September 3rd. 

What is the differnece between Watches and Warnings? 

  • TROPICAL STORM WATCH: An announcement that tropical storm conditions (sustained winds of 39 to 73 mph) are
possible within the specified coastal area within 48 hours.
  • TROPICAL STORM WARNING: An announcement that tropical storm conditions (sustained winds of 39 to 73 mph) are expected somewhere within the specified coastal area within 36 hours.
  • HURRICANE WATCH: An announcement that hurricane conditions (sustained winds of 74 mph or higher) are possible within the specified coastal area. Because hurricane preparedness activities become difficult once winds reach tropical storm force, the hurricane watch is issued 48 hours in advance of the anticipated onset of tropical-storm-force winds.
  • HURRICANE WARNING: An announcement that hurricane conditions (sustained winds of 74 mph or higher) are expected somewhere within the specified coastal area. Because hurricane preparedness activities become difficult once winds reach tropical storm force, the hurricane warning is issued 36 hours in advance of the anticipated onset of tropical-storm-force winds.
  • For more information on hurricanes and emergency preparedness, please click here.

     

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    FEMA Re-opens Disaster Incident Period to include Severe Storms and Flooding From March 13 - March 31, 2010

    Posted on Thu, Jul 15, 2010 @ 08:01 AM

    Release Date: July 14, 2010
    Release Number: 1899-014

    Albany, N.Y. -- Federal and state officials today announced that the incident period of the severe storms has been re-opened to cover the period from March 13 - March 31, 2010 and three additonal counties  -- Otsego, Schoharie, and Warren - have been added to the declaration.

    "I am pleased that the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) quickly reviewed the information gathered by state and local officials and approved Governor Paterson's request.  The longer incident period will provide needed reimbursement for communities as they repair damages caused by the severe March weather," said Andrew Feeney Director, New York State Office of Emergency Management (NYS OEM).

    Otsego, Schoharie, and Warren Counties join Nassau, Orange, Richmond, Rockland, Suffolk, and Westchester Counties, in being declared disaster areas.

    The amendment and additional counties to the incident period have been granted in response to Governor Paterson's appeal of June 29, 2010. The previous incident period was March 13-15. “By helping local and state governments recover, federal disaster assistance has a positive impact on  those communites,” said Federal Coordinating Officer Albie Lewis.

    Government entities and certain private non-profits in the additional three counties may be eligible for federal aid through the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA's) Public Assistance Program.  Aid may be available in one or more of the following seven categories: Debris Removal; Emergency Protective Measures; Road Systems and Bridges; Water Control Facilities; Public Buildings and Contents; Public Utilities, and Parks, Recreational and Other.

    Federal funding is available on a cost-sharing basis for hazard mitigation measures for all counties and tribes within the state. FEMA funds 75 percent of eligible costs.

    Article Source: FEMA

     

    Tags: disaster, long island storms march 2010, water damage basement flooding, water damage, FEMA, restoration company, flood damage, disaster restoration, flood, storm damage, storm, storm 2010, mold damage, flood water long island, flooded basements long island

    Property Damage: Long Island After the Storms of March, 2010

    Posted on Sun, Apr 11, 2010 @ 04:04 PM

    Long Island, New York City and the rest of New York and the Northeast was devastated from the recent flooding caused by torrential rain, wind, and storm damage.  A majority of flooded basements across Long Island were caused by ground water due to over-saturation of the earth.  Insurance companies do not cover groundwater under their policies. 

    You need to have a separate Flood Insurance if you fall into the Flood Coverage Area.  And that only covers property damage to structures that are above grade.  Basements are not above grade so they would be excluded from those policies. 

    That means there were many homeowners throughout Long Island and New York City that had flooded basements that were not covered by their insurance policy.   

    For some people this is too much.  There are a lot of people in hardship right now across Long Island due to the economic times we live in.  If they did not hire a professional restoration company or water damage cleanup company like Advanced Restoration Corporation, a DKI Member Company, they had to extract / remove the water themselves or rely on friends and/or family to help them out.

    But just because the water is removed or extracted, that does not mean the job is over.  The wet porous building materials need to be removed, or dried along with the structural wood members and concrete so their moisture content levels are reduced to regional acceptable standards.  

    And some people will just ignore the water in the basement or the leaky roof, thinking it will dry out on its own.  And technically, everything that gets wet will eventually dry, if it can.  And not every water intrusion causes severe mold contamination.  It all depends on the size of the area and the lenght of time the area has been wet without receiving any attention.

    At this  point you should ask yourself this:

    How long will it take?  Can the wet building materials dry out before mold contamination can occur (usually 48-72 hours in optimum conditions)? 

    If wet building materials are not addressed in a timely fashion then the problem magnifies exponentially over time until it becomes a much bigger and more expensive issue. 

    Please do not hesitate to Contact Us for any assistance or guidance if you have or even think you have a mold issue in the Long Island and New York City areas.  We would be more than happy to speak with you.


     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Mold Removal / Mold Remediation Services Long Island & New York City

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    Advanced Restoration Corporation

    a DKI Member Company

     
     
     
    Long Island Building Demolition
     
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    Advanced Restoration Corporation
     
    a DKI Member Company

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