Property Damage & Disaster Restoration Blog: Long Island & New York City

The ReUse People (TRP), Long Island Building Deconstruction, and Advanced Restoration Corporation

Posted on Fri, Apr 16, 2010 @ 08:14 PM

Advanced Restoration Corporation is proud to partner with The Reuse People (TRP) on all our Building Deconstruction projects to make the Long Island Community the Leader in Building Deconstruction and Building Material Reuse in New York and throughout the country.

By partnering with us, The ReUse People are able to expand into the Long Island market to promote Building Deconstruction and the salvage and sale of reusable building materials while diverting construction and demolition (C&D) waste from our overburdened landfills.

These services are among the first steps in the green building process. Furthermore, tax-deductible donations of reusable materials to TRP, a nonprofit 501(c)3 corporation, provide a faster payback and better return-on-investment than any other product or service offered by the green building industry on Long Island.

How The ReUse People (TRP) Started

The ReUse People (TRP) started in April, 1993, with a drive for building materials to help the flood victims in Tijuana, Mexico. The drive, Project Valle Verde, was planned and coordinated with the mayors of Tijuana and San Diego, the San Diego Chamber of Commerce, the County Board of Supervisors, San Diego Gas and Electric Company, Waste Management, and the Building Industry Association.
 
On April 23 and 24, contractors, other private companies, public agencies and the citizens of San Diego donated over 400 tons of building materials valued at $1.2 million. Twenty-seven tractor trailers crossed the border carrying this material in an unprecedented demonstration of bi-national cooperation and assistance.
 
The success of Project Valle Verde demonstrated the need for used building materials and the impact of this need on our already overused and over committed landfills.
 
The ReUse People started as Building Materials Distributors in San Diego in 1993 and, due to a name conflict with an existing corporation, the name was soon changed to The ReUse People.

Who Benefits from Our Partnership On Long Island?

  • All of us through a better environment on Long Island
  • Low income families who cannot afford to buy new building materials
  • Building deconstruction can also lead to the creation of new jobs and businesses
  • Building owners by virtue of tax donations
  • Architects, builders and contractors through better service to their clients
  • Reduced unemployment strengthens the Long Island economy directly as well as indirectly in areas such as retail sales and housing

While we obtain reusable building materials from a variety of sources, our own deconstruction efforts and those of over 30 TRP-Certified Deconstruction Contractors throughout the country contribute over 90 percent of them.
 
Whether you are an architect, general building contractor, building owner, or government agency on Long Island we stand ready to provide you with a package of benefits including:

  • Environmentally sound demolition (We like the words building deconstruction)
  • Building materials salvage
  • Advanced Restoration Corporation's skilled building deconstruction technicians
  • Tax donations for all the materials donated to The ReUse People (TRP)
  • Lower overall project costs
  • The assurance that someone, somewhere reuses the salvageable building materials generated from your project(s) on Long Island

 

The ReUse People (TRP) President - Ted Reiff

 

Prior to founding The ReUse People (TRP) in 1995, Ted Reiff was managing partner with an investment banking firm that provided financial services to young technology companies. Now, in addition to guiding TRP's national expansion program, he consults with private companies and government bodies on a variety of demolition and waste diversion projects. A graduate of Ohio State University and a licensed demolition contractor, Ted served three terms as board president of I Love a Clean San Diego and is an advisor to Urban Habitat Chicago.

 

The ReUse People (TRP) Long Island Regional Manager - Mike Yurish

Mike holds a B.S. degree in environmental science from SUNY Purchase, New York, and has been an amateur deconstructionist for some 20 years. He serves on the board of directors of the ReCONNstruction Center in New Britain, Connecticut, and is a licensed realtor and appraisal trainee in New Jersey. A resident of Connecticut, Mike currently works as a senior print technician for a major printing company.  

Advanced Restoration Corporation - Eric Martin

 

Eric Martin has been in the family business for over 16 years.  He is certified by the Institute of Inspection, Cleaning, and Restoration Certification (IICRC) in Water Damage Mitigation and Advanced Structural Drying as well as holding his certification by the Restoration Industry Association (RIA) in Mold Remediation.  Eric has worked in New York City for 8 months after 9/11 cleaning up the building surrounding Ground Zero.  He also worked in New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina.    A Green Risk Professional from Vale Training Institute he is also a member of the Communications Committee from the U.S. Green Building Council's Long Island (USGBC-LI) chapter in charge of handling USGBC-LI's social media accounts.

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Advanced Restoration Corporation is proud to partner with The Reuse People (TRP) on all our Building Deconstruction projects to make the Long Island Community the Leader in Building Deconstruction and Building Material Reuse in New York and throughout the country.

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Building Deconstruction: Saving Long Island Landfills...One Building At A Time

Posted on Tue, Apr 13, 2010 @ 05:05 PM

 

What a beautiful weekend we just had on Long Island.  The Storms of March 2010 are behind us. Those of us in the insurance industry are slowing down a bit catching up on all our paperwork, riding the crest of the wave down to the end of its journey.  It felt like Spring for the first time for me this weekend.

On Sunday, I drove out to Sag Harbor, New York out on the East End of Long Island in the area most notably known as The Hamptons.  I went to inspect a home that was at the end of its use.  The new owners purchased the house, basically for the land, and plan to build a new one in its place.

But what do you do with the old house?  Just because the home is at the end of its life cycle, does not mean the building materials that make up the house are at the end of their usage. But since the advent of "mass production" the acceptable way to get rid of the old homes on Long Island (and the rest of the country) was to knock it down or "demo" with a bulldozer and dump all the construction and demolition (C&D) waste in the landfills. But there are other "greener" more cost-effective practices that can benefit the homeowner, the environment, and the Long Island community.

I inspected the house with a representative of The Reuse People (TRP). TRP is a Non-Profit Organization based in California with branches all over the United States. TRP keeps reusable and recyclable building materials out of overburdened landfills by promoting building deconstruction and channeling the building material back into the marketplace through donations and sales at its network of retail outlets. TRP works closely with local building deconstruction contractors to try and salvage up to 80 percent of the building materials (varies depending upon age and type of materials) during the building deconstruction process. These services are among the first steps in the green building process.

The house is a roughly 2,000SF ranch with an unfinished basement, attic, and small detached garage built in 1981. The previous owner had used it as a rental property and the house was not in the best of condition. The kitchen cabinets and wood floors were not salvageable due to water damage and type of materials. The wood floors today come in short pieces and are less valuable than longer older pieces. They are also very hard to piece back together. The single-pane wood windows and hallow core doors did not have much value either. Also the brick fireplace was relatively new and made with much stronger mortar than older masonry work. Because the mortar is much stronger, it is hard to clean the brick and reuse the material in a future construction project(s).

Building deconstruction is more labor intensive due to the care our deconstruction technicians must use when deconstructing the reusable building materials to save their value. We take the ultimate care in deconstructing, handling and packing the reusable building materials because too much breakage can disrupt the whole economics of the project and have one unhappy building owner or homeowner. A 2,000SF house takes five deconstruction technicians four weeks to deconstruct.

The representative of The Reuse People estimated the total value of usable building materials at roughly $20,000. That means the homeowner would get a tax deductible donation (percentage would depend on building owner or homeowner's income tax bracket) when he or she donated the reusable building materials to The Reuse People for distribution and resale in their network.

Below is a comparison of the cost of both Building Deconstruction vs. Demolition for this particular project in Sag Harbor, Long Island.

Process:

Deconstruction

Demolition

Cost:

$25,000

$15,000

Donations:

$20,000

 

Tax Deduction:

$5,000

 

Total Cost:

$20,000

$15,000

For this house, it is more cost effective to demolish the house than it is to perform any soft stripping or building deconstruction because there is very little value in the minimal reusable building materials we could have salvage from the home. In today's economy, like most of the Long Island green building industry, cost is still the driving factor over "the right thing to do".

Below is a list of building deconstruction projects that The Reuse People have worked on and the total dollar value of reusable building materials salvaged from each project.

City

Square Feet

Donation Value

Newport Beach, CA

5,523

$182,346

Napa, CA

3,342

$102,025

Oakland, CA

1,400

$74,144

Santa Barbara, CA

2,100

$57,000

Denver, CO

2,900

$125,566

Chicago, IL

2,200

$110,096

Chicago, IL

$2,800

$118,150

Bellevue, WA

3,800

$175,600

Kenosha, WI

2,250

$98,000

The list of soft stripping and building deconstruction project above that have overseen by The Reuse People throughout the United States prove that building deconstruction on Long Island can be a cost effective green building alternative to demolition if there is value in the reusable building materials.

It is Advanced Restoration Corporation's earnest desire to make the Long Island Community a Leader in Building Deconstruction and Building Material Reuse in New York and throughout the country. Please feel free to contact us if you have any questions regarding our Soft Stripping or Building Deconstruction Services on Long Island.

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