Property Damage & Disaster Restoration Blog: Long Island & New York City

Sycorp Calc: Apps to Help the Insurance Adjuster

Posted on Tue, Nov 26, 2013 @ 12:36 PM
Sycorp Calculater Android iPhone Apps Help Insurance Adjuster Long Island New York City Advanced Restoration Property Damage Disaster Restoration

Sycorp Calculater For Android & iPhones

The Sycorp Calc app provides quick and easy access to a number of calculations used in Restoration, Construction, HVAC and Indoor Air Quality industries. Easy to use, quick access for use on job sites. Great for water technicians, supervisors, and insurance adjusters. Based on IICRC formulas.

Instant calculations and optimized screens mean fast calculations.

 

Calculations include: 

  • Water Damage Restoration - dehumidifiers and air movers needed on a job based on Class of Loss and size of area. Also how many gallons of water in a given area.
  • Psychrometric calculations: Calculate Grains per pound (GPP) specific humidity, dew point, grain depression
  • Heating/Cooling: how many BTU's needed to heat or cool an area to a specific temperature
  • Indoor Air Quality: How many HEPA air units needed for specific Air Changes per Hour (ACH)
  • Power: how many kW are needed for equipment and cost to power. Also power required for given amount/type of equipment
  • Includes Manufacturer specs on latest models of dehumidifiers and HEPA Air Filter/Negative Air Machines
  • Also includes Definitions for common terms and acronyms.
  • Pro version also available with additional features such as multi room input, air movers by Linear feet, Class 4 calculations, email info, and more.

 

Sycorp Calc Android Google Play Advanced Restoration Insurance Adjuster Apps        

sycorp calc insurance adjuster apps disaster restoration property damage

Tags: iicrc, long island, water damage, new york, restoration, disaster restoration, insurance adjuster

How Humidity Can Cause Property Damage to Your Home or Building

Posted on Wed, Jul 18, 2012 @ 09:06 AM

Humidity Property  Damage Mold Long Island New York Structural Drying Home Business Building

By Steve Graham, Networx

Humidity doesn’t just make you uncomfortable. It also causes problems and health hazards at every level of the home. Here is a bottom-to-top summary of some of the dangers of high humidity, and some solutions for each problem.

Underground problems

Humid weather simply exacerbates moisture problems that are often a concern in crawl spaces and basements. Moisture from the ground works with moisture from the humid air to generate condensation on walls and other surfaces, and create muggy basement smells and atmospheres. In turn, this can translate to mold and mildew issues. To avoid these problems, it is important to take steps to minimize moisture below the main floor of the home.

If humidity is an issue in any season, foundation vents should be left open all year to help the foundation dry out as much as possible. On the other hand, close basement windows and doors to keep out humid summer weather.

If humidity is an issue for a basement, insulate basement walls and run a dehumidifier. Rigid foam insulation is one good option, as it is essentially waterproof. However, it must be covered with drywall or another fire barrier. Attach a humidistat to the dehumidifier to control the humidity levels.

Crawl spaces should be covered with polyethylene or other thick, solid vapor barrier to keep moisture from the ground from creating bigger problems. Crawl spaces with moisture barriers also should have one square foot of vent area for every 1,500 square feet of crawl space area, according to Michigan State University (MSU) researchers. Crawl spaces without moisture barriers should have one square foot of venting per 150 square feet of space.

 

Mechanical system problems

Humid weather can also leave condensation on water pipes and toilet tanks. Again, this condensation can also lead to mold and mildew problems. If the toilet tank regularly beads with condensation, consider installing waterproof insulation inside the tank. Also wrap insulation around water pipes to minimize condensation.

 

Flooring problems

Moving up from the basement, the floor is the next likely victim of humidity problems. Mold and mildew can get into wood flooring or carpets, and may be hard to completely remove. It is best to avoid such problems by reducing humidity. Air conditioning systems reduce humidity while reducing the temperature, if they are installed correctly.

 

Mildewed carpet should be cleaned with an electric shampoo machine. If musty odors develop on carpet, either replace the entire carpet or have it professionally cleaned and dried off-site. Replace musty or damp padding.

If mildew develops on wood flooring, scrub it off with trisodium phosphate or quaternary disinfectants, then rinse and dry thoroughly, and add a mildew-resistant paint.

 

Storage Problems

Humidity can also wreak havoc on clothes, food and other stored items. Dry foods can draw in moisture and quickly go stale if humidity exceeds 60 percent. Cans may rust and leak in humid weather. Damaged or swollen cans should be tossed out. If humidity is an issue, keep stored food in an air-conditioned space.

 

Reduce humidity damage to clothing with chemical absorbents or through proper ventilation. Use silica gel packets or other moisture-absorbing materials if you plan to tightly close all closet doors and trunks. The other option is to leave closet doors open and use fans to improve air circulation. Also separate clothes within each closet to allow airflow between items.

 

Wall problems

Humid air can also build up in walls, which can become soggy over time, and may even attract mold and mildew. Interior and exterior paint can also bubble and peel under extended humid conditions.


To minimize such problems, boost wall insulation and consider vapor-retardant paints. Also caulk or weather strip all gaps and cracks around the walls, baseboards, doors and windows. According to MSU researchers, such sealing work can minimize moisture problems in walls.

 

Attic problems

Finally, attics can get hot and uncomfortably damp in humid weather. Be sure to properly ventilate the attic. If the attic does not have a vapor barrier (which may not be a necessity in many cases), it should have one square foot of venting per 150 square feet of attic, according to MSU research. For areas with vapor barriers, one foot of venting per 300 square feet of attic is acceptable.

Humid weather can cause a variety of home problems and hazards, but they can all be prevented or remedied with some care and diligence.

 

Tags: long island, property damage, water damage, new york, humidity, relative humidity

WATER DAMAGE CHECKLIST

Posted on Fri, Mar 16, 2012 @ 10:29 AM

insurance disaster safety business home water damage disaster safety,disastersafety.org,disaster,disaster kleenup,dki,long island,new york, water damage,water damage restoration,restoration

Answer the following questions to help determine areas where water can get inside.

When water finds its way inside your home or busines during a hurricane, it can soak attic insulation and drywall, and cause extensive damage to other parts of the structure. This can lead to costly repairs, keep you out of your house for an extended period of time or delay the re-opening of your business following a disaster. The Insurance Institute for Business & Home Safety (IBHS) developed the following checklist to help identify areas that are the most common sources of water intrusion. With proper evaluation and maintenance, you can reduce your risk of damage. 

  1. Are there gaps around water faucet pipes where they enter the walls of the house? Find a solution.

  2. Are there gaps around gas pipes where they enter the house? Find a solution.

  3. Are there gaps around air conditioning pipes (white and foam covered) where they enter the house? Find a solution.

  4. Are there any gaps around electrical outlet boxes, junction boxes, circuit breaker boxes, disconnect switches, electric meters, etc.? Find a solution.

  5. Are there gaps between light fixtures and the face of the house? Find a solution.

  6. Are there gaps around dryer vents, gas water heater vents, range hood vents and the house? Find a solution.

  7. Are there cracks or voids in the mortar under the window sills? Find a solution.

  8. Is the finished floor of the house high (at least 6 inches) above soil and mulch?Find a solution.

  9. Are there parts of the house where water has gotten inside after heavy rains or where there has been standing water next to the house? Find a solution.

  10. Are there penetrations of the house within 6 inches of the ground? Find a solution.

Tags: water damage long island, water damage, water damage new york, safety, disaster safety, prevent water damage, water damage checklist

Winter Is Here, And So Are Your Frozen Pipes!

Posted on Mon, Dec 12, 2011 @ 11:29 AM

Everyone in New York knows that the winter season in the Northeast can be treacherous and cause major damage to property structures.  Whether you are a homeowner or business professional, it is important to become educated on preventing frozen pipes.

Why Do Pipes Freeze?

Water has a unique property in that it expands as it freezes. This expansion puts tremendous pressure on whatever is containing it, including metal or plastic pipes. No matter the "strength" of a container, expanding water can cause pipes to break. Pipes that freeze most frequently are those that are exposed to severe cold, like outdoor hose bibs, swimming pool supply lines, water sprinkler lines, and water supply pipes in unheated interior areas like basements and crawl spaces, attics, garages, or kitchen cabinets. Also, pipes that run against exterior walls that have little or no insulation are also subject to freezing.

Preventing Frozen Pipes

Before the onset of cold weather, prevent freezing of water supply lines and pipes by following these recommendations:

  • Drain water from swimming pool and water sprinkler supply lines following manufacturer's or installer's directions. Do not put antifreeze in these lines unless directed. Antifreeze is environmentally harmful, and is dangerous to humans, pets, wildlife, and landscaping.
  • Remove, drain, and store hoses used outdoors. Close inside valves supplying outdoor hose bibs. Open the outside hose bibs to allow water to drain. Keep the outside valve open so that any water remaining in the pipe can expand without causing the pipe to break.
  • Check around the home for other areas where water supply lines are located and are in unheated areas. Look in the basement, crawl space, attic, garage, and under kitchen and bathroom cabinets. Both hot and cold water pipes in these areas should be insulated. A hot water supply line can freeze just as a cold water supply line can freeze if the water is not running through the pipe and the water temperature in the pipe is cold.
  • Consider installing specific products made to insulate water pipes like a "pipe sleeve" or installing UL-listed "heat tape," "heat cable," or similar materials on exposed water pipes. Many products are available at your local building supplies retailer. Pipes should be carefully wrapped, with ends butted tightly and joints wrapped with tape. Follow manufacturer's recommendations for installing and using these products.

Before the onset of cold weather, prevent freezing of water supply lines and pipes by following these recommendations:

If you have an issue related to frozen pipes, contact us immediately to alleviate the potential of further property damage to your home or business.

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Tags: cold weather, freezing cold, winter, long island, water damage, new york, frozen pipes

Advanced Restoration, Water Damage, and Moisture Detection

Posted on Mon, Dec 05, 2011 @ 10:49 AM

moisture detection,moisture meter,water damage,water damage mitigation,long island,nerw york,new york city

Advanced Restoration Corp. has been in business for over 20 years.  In that time we have seen the evolution of moisture meters in the water damage mitigation industry.  Through much trial and error with different brands and types of moisture meters over the years we have fine tuned our moisture detection equipment to utilize the best the industry has to offer.

Advanced Restoration Corp. has chosen to stock our Project Managers and Emergency Response Teams with the finest selection of moisture meters and moisture measuring instruments that are vital to any water damage mitigation.

Moisture meters are necessary on EVERY water damage to find the answers to these very important questions:

  • What Is Wet?
  • How Wet Is It?
  • Is Equipment Working Properly?
  • Is It Dry? 

We Utilize Every Tool In Our Toolbox

Advanced Restoration Corp. has many valuable tools at their disposal to detect moisture inside a structure.  They all should be utilized to get an accurate assessment of the moisture intrusion and extent of water damaged building materials.

Thermal Imaging shows temperature differences in building materials.  It does not show what is wet.  Moisture Meters ALWAYS are used in conjunction with our thermal imaging cameras to confirm the presence of moisture hidden in building materials.

We Utilize Our Moisture Meters To:

  • Take relative humidity and temperature readings and apply psychrometric calculations in order to determine the specific humidity of the structure in various locations, including outside air and the exhaust of the dehumidification equipment.

  • Monitor the specific humidity levels to make sure our equipment is running properly, the ambient humdity levels continue to decrease in our drying chamber and we are not causing any secondary damage by accidentally increasing the humdity level (installation of air movers) without the proper dehumidification.

  • Take moisture content readings from various building materials and in a multitude of locations to determine the extent of the water damage and the progress of the drying of the building materials throughout the drying process.

  • This would also include getting a dry standard moisture content measurements of known building materials from other locations in the structure so we can use a comparison of measurements in finding out what is the normal moisture content if these building materials had not been saturated with water.

All these  measurements are recorded and updated daily so that we will have accurate information to know when the drying process is complete.

 
Click on the names below to see videos of some of our preferred moisture meters:

Tags: long island, water damage, moisture meter, moisture detection, moisture content, restoration, moisture, new york city

Emergency Water Extraction Services: Long Island and New York City

Posted on Fri, Nov 18, 2011 @ 09:47 AM

water extraction,water removal,long island,new york city,drying equipment,response time,emergency services

One of the worst things that can happen is having an insurance claim due to a pipe break or water heater malfunction that causes a water intrusion to flood your basement or saturate your home or office.  Advanced Restoration's Disaster and Emergency Response Time minimizes the property damage that can be caused by a flood.  Our emergency water extraction services have assisted many homes and buildings throughout Long Island and New York City. 

We Perform Emergency Water Extraction / Water Removal Services Due All Forms of Water Instrusions.

Whether it is standing water or water trapped in the building materials, it is 500 times faster to physically remove the water by extracting than it is to evaporate it using structural drying equipment.

Why Thorough Water Extraction / Removal Is Necessary:

  • Reduces the overall costs for complete restoration

  • Minimized the chance of future mold growth

  • Reduces the need to replace saturated building materials including carpet, padding, and sheetrock

  • Claims get closed faster

  • Reduces the disruption of the home or building owner

Increases customer satisfaction

Advanced Restoration's Emergency Water Extraction Crew
 
 
More Water Extraction Performed by Advanced Restoration
 
 
 

 

Tags: disaster, extraction, wet building materials, drying equipment, response time, long island, water damage, structural drying, emergency, water extraction, water removal, new york city

New York Homeowners Beware: After Snow, the Ice Dam Cometh

Posted on Fri, Feb 04, 2011 @ 01:52 PM

Written by 

Gwendolyn Bounds

for The Wall Street Journal

new york,long island,ice dam,water damage,freezing,water,leak damage,leak,roof,collapseThe latest winter storm, coupled with heavy snow accumulation and long cold snaps across the U.S., have left homeowners, pedestrians and buildings themselves unusually vulnerable to the dangers of ice and snow buildup.

Well beyond slipping, there's a growing risk of injury from falling material. Recently, a chunk of ice plunged from a pine tree and landed on Mark D'Ambrosio as he cleared the driveway of his of Abington, Mass., home. His son called 911, and Mr. D'Ambrosio was hospitalized briefly with a head wound that required three staples.

"I've been in this house 13 years and never seen anything like what's happening this winter," says the 39-year-old Mr. D'Ambrosio.

Other times, the danger comes from homeowners trying to clear roofs of winter's mess before it causes structural damage.

While roof collapses get the most attention, a more common worry for the average homeowner is ice dams. These often form when an under-insulated home's heat escapes through the attic, warms the roof and melts snow. As water runs down the roof it can refreeze into an icy dam along the overhang, which is cooler—much like a bridge.

If the dam gets big enough, it can then block water from running off the roof and force it to back up under shingles, triggering leaks and other damage. Icicles are one symptom of dams forming.

As snow and ice storms pummel the Northeast, Midwest and South this week, consumers are trying to remove snow however they can. Sales of roof rakes—long-handled tools used from the safety of ground level—are up 30% at Garelick Manufacturing Co., which went back into production this month to meet demand. Northern Tool + Equipment Co. cites unusually strong demand for its hockey puck-sized RoofMelt tablets made of calcium chloride, which can be tossed atop roofs to fuel melting.

Businesses specializing in ice-cutting with pressurized steam or hot water and other solutions report a surge of interest. Bylin Heating Systems Inc. has logged a 200% rise in inquiries this winter for its electrical ice-melting roof systems, which are best installed after existing dams are cleared. Similar demand is brewing for installers of attic insulation and other products that prevent heat loss and slow ice dam formation.

Tom Mahoney's 8,000 square foot house in Edina, Minn., was damaged after a thick ice dam formed along his roofline and triggered water leaks in his master bedroom. His solution: pay $1,000 to have chunks of the ice removed professionally.

Mr. Mahoney's contractor, Philip Grave of Dale Services Inc., says he and his brother are on track to earn $100,000 this winter as roof ice-cutters. The duo, who operate a carpet and window-cleaning business in warmer weather, charge $250 to $300 an hour to climb on roofs and slice away at ice dams with 180-200 degree water using a pressure washer-type system. Says Mr. Grave: "We cut ice every day in December and had a wait list."

But with so much snow, residents often are taking drastic short-term actions themselves. In Minnesota, where some areas have received more than 55 inches so far, a Shoreview man died Christmas Day after falling from his roof clearing snow. Meantime, Immanuel St. Joseph's hospital in Mankato has logged a surge of emergency room visits from people injured toppling off their rooftops while shoveling, says hospital spokesman Kevin Burns.

"It's directly attributable to the increased snow," says Mr. Burns who reports everything from scrapes and bruises to broken bones and serious internal injuries. "People are very well-intentioned but aren't prepared for the slippery conditions and steep pitch of the surface."

Last week in New York City, which had its snowiest January in history, the Department of Buildings issued a warning reminding property owners they are legally obligated to remove ice and snow from roofs, overhangs and awnings—and singled out icicles as "a threat to public safety."

A growing number of new homes are built with thicker insulation that can help prevent ice dams, including more than a million new homes that have earned the federal government's Energy Star label, and there are tax credits and subsidies available for retrofits.

"Most of the time, the ice is there and you are rolling the dice and may or may not have a big chunk hit someone's car or head, or a leak, but the risk is always there," says Mike Rogers, vice president of GreenHomes America Inc., a national home energy retrofit company.

When 51-year-old April Butler of Syracuse, N.Y., moved into her home in December, she wasn't aware that her house was at risk. But soon, dams and icicles hung like a cave around her front door, threatening to pull down her gutters and possibly harming a passer-by, including her 17-year-old daughter.

Ms. Butler hired GreenHomes America last week to blow insulation into her attic crawl space, seal air-leaks with foam and replace recessed ceiling light fixtures where the home's heat was escaping.

All these measures are designed to prevent ice dams from forming in the first place; much of what she has now is beginning to thaw.

The total cost: $7,062, for which she received a $2,500 subsidy based on her income as a teaching assistant from the Assisted Home Performance with Energy Star program.

"As of yet, we've had no leak damage," Ms. Butler says. "Hopefully this will eliminate the fear."

Write to Gwendolyn Bounds at wendy.bounds@wsj.com

Tags: homeowner, water damage, new york, water, ice dam, leak damage, roof

FEMA Re-opens Disaster Incident Period to include Severe Storms and Flooding From March 13 - March 31, 2010

Posted on Thu, Jul 15, 2010 @ 08:01 AM

Release Date: July 14, 2010
Release Number: 1899-014

Albany, N.Y. -- Federal and state officials today announced that the incident period of the severe storms has been re-opened to cover the period from March 13 - March 31, 2010 and three additonal counties  -- Otsego, Schoharie, and Warren - have been added to the declaration.

"I am pleased that the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) quickly reviewed the information gathered by state and local officials and approved Governor Paterson's request.  The longer incident period will provide needed reimbursement for communities as they repair damages caused by the severe March weather," said Andrew Feeney Director, New York State Office of Emergency Management (NYS OEM).

Otsego, Schoharie, and Warren Counties join Nassau, Orange, Richmond, Rockland, Suffolk, and Westchester Counties, in being declared disaster areas.

The amendment and additional counties to the incident period have been granted in response to Governor Paterson's appeal of June 29, 2010. The previous incident period was March 13-15. “By helping local and state governments recover, federal disaster assistance has a positive impact on  those communites,” said Federal Coordinating Officer Albie Lewis.

Government entities and certain private non-profits in the additional three counties may be eligible for federal aid through the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA's) Public Assistance Program.  Aid may be available in one or more of the following seven categories: Debris Removal; Emergency Protective Measures; Road Systems and Bridges; Water Control Facilities; Public Buildings and Contents; Public Utilities, and Parks, Recreational and Other.

Federal funding is available on a cost-sharing basis for hazard mitigation measures for all counties and tribes within the state. FEMA funds 75 percent of eligible costs.

Article Source: FEMA

 

Tags: disaster, long island storms march 2010, water damage basement flooding, water damage, FEMA, restoration company, flood damage, disaster restoration, flood, storm damage, storm, storm 2010, mold damage, flood water long island, flooded basements long island

Long Island After the Storms: Replacing Damaged Building Materials

Posted on Sun, Apr 25, 2010 @ 04:29 PM

 

We have received hundreds of calls from people all over Long Island telling us they had and in some cases still have, water in their basement due to groundwater.  As in most cases, it was not covered by their insurance company.  Which means you have either cleaned it up yourself or paid a company like Advanced Restoration Corporation to mitigate the water damage for you. 

The basement is now cleaned up and dried.  But that brings up the million dollar question......what do you do with the basement now?  If it was a finished basement that you used as living space and/or work space, how do you rebuild?  Or do you leave it unfinished now not wanting to take on the un-budgeted expense of the reconstruction in the off chance of having to go through it all over again if we are hit with another series of severe storms.  That is a choice every Long Island homeowner who was affected by these recent storms has to make.  For the sake of this blog, we are going to assume that you have decided to go through with the reconstruction. 

Let me start by stating that building materials can get wet.  Sheetrock, carpet, and paint are all made with water at some point during their production processes.  Usually after the materials are dried they are stronger and more durable than before they were wet.  Wood can get wet.  The lumber yards are exactly that.  Yards.  Giant lots of land used to store building materials before they are sold and used to construct homes and buildings.  They are not called lumber garages.    Chances are the studs that make up your house had been wet numerous times before the builder used them to frame your home. 

It is not a question of if something gets wet is it unsalvageable.  It is a question of how quickly you react when building materials do get wet. The faster the action the greater the chances of salvaging ALL the affected building materials.

There is something you can do that not many people have caught on to yet and none of the professionals on TV talk about just because they have yet to go through the experience of having their home saturated by water.  You can rebuild with building materials that can withstand an intrusion of water. 

Of course it is a bit more expensive to rebuild with this in mind and every homeowner is going to have see what works best for their budget and quality of life.  But here are some things to think about when rebuilding your basement:

Install ceramic tile as your flooring.  Carpet can get wet and be salvaged if dried timely and professionally, vinyl does not absorb the water but traps it underneath so that demolition is inevitable, the same with any type of wood flooring that would have to have a vapor barrier installed underneath  The best choice to finish a floor in a basement short of polishing the concrete is ceramic tile.  It is not a porous material so it does not absorb moisture and mold will not grow on the ceramic.  (Mold will grow on the dirt that is on the ceramic tile but will not start eating the tile away like it would on a porous material like sheetrock or carpet.)  And the grout allows the water vapor to escape from underneath the tile in the drying process.  Put an area rug on top of the tile that is much easier to remove and have cleaned that typical wall to wall carpeting.  

Do not use ANY vinyl.  I know vinyl makes it very easy to clean and keep on top off but it is the worst material (short of asbestos) to use as a finished building material.  Anything that vinyl covers that gets wet 99.9% of the time has to be removed.  Vinyl acts as a vapor barrier that traps the moisture behind it and does not allow the building materials to dry.  Which causes mold growth and usually increases the dollar value of the project.  Use standard wood base trim or carpet cove base.  They can both allow the walls to be dried in place or they both can be easily detached and reset once the drying process is over.

Use Concrete Board for the lower walls.  Do not install regular gypsum drywall on the lower walls.  Use concrete board that builders use in bathrooms to protect against moisture in the shower / tub areas.  They come in 4' x 8' sheets.  Just turn them on their side and install them on the lower 4' of the basement walls.  The great value of cement board is does not rot, warp, grow mold, or deteriorate, when subjected to water.

* If you decide that you are going to install standard drywall on the lower walls please make sure that the sheetrock is elevated 1/2" to 3/4" off the ground and is not sitting directly on the concrete.  If the drywall is resting directly on the concrete floor you will always have a transference of moisture from the concrete to to the dryer sheetrock which eventually will turn into a long term mold problem.  See the picture below. 


Use Only Flat Paint.  Any semi-gloss, high gloss or even eggshell finishes creates a vapor barrier that does not allow the materials behind it to dry naturally in the event of an intrusion.

Use American Clay Earth Plasters as your wall finishes American Clay Earth Plasters are a natural, environmentally friendly way to finish any interior. Non-toxic and made in the USA, these plasters are an alternative to cement, acrylic and lime plasters, offering superior color, richness, texture and depth not found with other finishes.  They also help control the inside ambient temperatures in the room(s0 it is installed on the walls.  They absorb excess moisture in the warmer months and release moisture n the environment during the colder dryer months.  This also gives it the ability to permit the drying of the building materials it is installed over.  

If you are in the Long Island and New York City areas and have any questions and/or need any assistance in dealing with your property damage claim please do not hesitate to contact Advanced Restoration Corporation.  We are Disaster Kleenup International (DKI) Member company.  DKI has over 150 member companies located throughout the United States.  Click here to find one in your area.

 

Tags: water damage long island, long island, property damage, water damage, dki, property damage long island, disaster kleenup interntional, disaster kleenup, replacing damage building materials, concrete board, american clay plaster, new york, advanced restoration corporation, reconstruction, disaster restoration, long island after the storms, replacing building materials

The ReUse People (TRP), Long Island Building Deconstruction, and Advanced Restoration Corporation

Posted on Fri, Apr 16, 2010 @ 08:14 PM

Advanced Restoration Corporation is proud to partner with The Reuse People (TRP) on all our Building Deconstruction projects to make the Long Island Community the Leader in Building Deconstruction and Building Material Reuse in New York and throughout the country.

By partnering with us, The ReUse People are able to expand into the Long Island market to promote Building Deconstruction and the salvage and sale of reusable building materials while diverting construction and demolition (C&D) waste from our overburdened landfills.

These services are among the first steps in the green building process. Furthermore, tax-deductible donations of reusable materials to TRP, a nonprofit 501(c)3 corporation, provide a faster payback and better return-on-investment than any other product or service offered by the green building industry on Long Island.

How The ReUse People (TRP) Started

The ReUse People (TRP) started in April, 1993, with a drive for building materials to help the flood victims in Tijuana, Mexico. The drive, Project Valle Verde, was planned and coordinated with the mayors of Tijuana and San Diego, the San Diego Chamber of Commerce, the County Board of Supervisors, San Diego Gas and Electric Company, Waste Management, and the Building Industry Association.
 
On April 23 and 24, contractors, other private companies, public agencies and the citizens of San Diego donated over 400 tons of building materials valued at $1.2 million. Twenty-seven tractor trailers crossed the border carrying this material in an unprecedented demonstration of bi-national cooperation and assistance.
 
The success of Project Valle Verde demonstrated the need for used building materials and the impact of this need on our already overused and over committed landfills.
 
The ReUse People started as Building Materials Distributors in San Diego in 1993 and, due to a name conflict with an existing corporation, the name was soon changed to The ReUse People.

Who Benefits from Our Partnership On Long Island?

  • All of us through a better environment on Long Island
  • Low income families who cannot afford to buy new building materials
  • Building deconstruction can also lead to the creation of new jobs and businesses
  • Building owners by virtue of tax donations
  • Architects, builders and contractors through better service to their clients
  • Reduced unemployment strengthens the Long Island economy directly as well as indirectly in areas such as retail sales and housing

While we obtain reusable building materials from a variety of sources, our own deconstruction efforts and those of over 30 TRP-Certified Deconstruction Contractors throughout the country contribute over 90 percent of them.
 
Whether you are an architect, general building contractor, building owner, or government agency on Long Island we stand ready to provide you with a package of benefits including:

  • Environmentally sound demolition (We like the words building deconstruction)
  • Building materials salvage
  • Advanced Restoration Corporation's skilled building deconstruction technicians
  • Tax donations for all the materials donated to The ReUse People (TRP)
  • Lower overall project costs
  • The assurance that someone, somewhere reuses the salvageable building materials generated from your project(s) on Long Island

 

The ReUse People (TRP) President - Ted Reiff

 

Prior to founding The ReUse People (TRP) in 1995, Ted Reiff was managing partner with an investment banking firm that provided financial services to young technology companies. Now, in addition to guiding TRP's national expansion program, he consults with private companies and government bodies on a variety of demolition and waste diversion projects. A graduate of Ohio State University and a licensed demolition contractor, Ted served three terms as board president of I Love a Clean San Diego and is an advisor to Urban Habitat Chicago.

 

The ReUse People (TRP) Long Island Regional Manager - Mike Yurish

Mike holds a B.S. degree in environmental science from SUNY Purchase, New York, and has been an amateur deconstructionist for some 20 years. He serves on the board of directors of the ReCONNstruction Center in New Britain, Connecticut, and is a licensed realtor and appraisal trainee in New Jersey. A resident of Connecticut, Mike currently works as a senior print technician for a major printing company.  

Advanced Restoration Corporation - Eric Martin

 

Eric Martin has been in the family business for over 16 years.  He is certified by the Institute of Inspection, Cleaning, and Restoration Certification (IICRC) in Water Damage Mitigation and Advanced Structural Drying as well as holding his certification by the Restoration Industry Association (RIA) in Mold Remediation.  Eric has worked in New York City for 8 months after 9/11 cleaning up the building surrounding Ground Zero.  He also worked in New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina.    A Green Risk Professional from Vale Training Institute he is also a member of the Communications Committee from the U.S. Green Building Council's Long Island (USGBC-LI) chapter in charge of handling USGBC-LI's social media accounts.

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Advanced Restoration Corporation is proud to partner with The Reuse People (TRP) on all our Building Deconstruction projects to make the Long Island Community the Leader in Building Deconstruction and Building Material Reuse in New York and throughout the country.

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