Property Damage & Disaster Restoration Blog: Long Island & New York City

Travelers Insurance and Weather.com Present: My Friends' Weather

Posted on Thu, Aug 02, 2012 @ 09:40 AM

When the Weather Is Bad,

Where Are the People You Care About?

The Weather Channel My Friends Weather Travelers Insurance Severe Weather Long Island New York

My Friends' Weather is a groundbreaking service that connects the weather to the people in your life brought to you by Travelers Insurance Company and The Weather Channel.

Travelers Insurance Weather Channel My Friends Weather Weather.com Long Island Disaster New York City Severe Weather

See friends and family who may be affected by Breaking Now weather news, so you can be first to warn them and stay in touch. It's easy to sign up through Facebook. Learn more below.

See Who's At Risk Due to the Weather

With My Friends' Weather, you can see who's at risk when a Breaking Now Alert is activated on Weather.com.

Once you have signed up with your Facebook account, Breaking Now weather alerts will include your friends and family who live in the affected area.

These people will only show for you, and only when you are logged into Facebook.

Easy Sign-Up

Have a Facebook account? It's a snap to sign up for My Friends' Weather.

1. Go to the My Friends' Weather app page on Facebook and log in. On that page, click the link that says "Visit Website."

2. Then click "Allow" on the permissions box that pops up. The next time a Breaking Now Alert is active, the red bar will display any friends who live in the affected area.

You can also sign up when a Breaking Now Alert is active. Click the "See Friends" link on the bar to sign up.

When you click, you'll be presented with a Facebook permissions box.

We only ask for the information we need for My Friends' Weather.

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Stay in Touch with Friends

Once you have signed up, you can share the Breaking Now news with friends - click on a friend in the red bar, or click to see more friends.

breaking now alerts weather channel stay in touch with friends travelers insurance severe weather long island new york

Click a friend to share the Breaking Now Alert directly to the friend's Facebook timeline.

You can add a comment, too. Your message and the Breaking Now Alert will appear on your friend's Facebook timeline, with a link back to weather.com for more information.

weather channel my friends weather breaking now alert facebook

If you comment on a friend's weather or notify a friend about a Breaking Now Alert, thatactivity ("notified a friend," for instance) will appear on your timeline, but we do not expose the person you shared to, nor your comment.

Questions? Feedback?

Visit the Weather.com Help Center for answers to your questions about the Travelers Insurance sponsored My Friends' Weather.

And they would love to hear your feedback on My Friends' Weather, so tell them what you think.

 

Tags: long island, facebook, insurance, new york, weather, severe weather, travelers insurance, my friends weather

Wind Damage to Your Home: Wind Advisory in New York

Posted on Tue, Dec 29, 2009 @ 08:54 AM
Heavy winds are pounding Long Island today and the National Weather Service has issued a Wind Advisory for parts of New York. 

During a severe storm or a hurricane, homes may be damaged or destroyed by high winds. Debris can break windows and doors, allowing high winds inside the home. In extreme storms, the force of the wind alone can cause weak places in your home to fail.

Some helpful tips regarding wind damage and preparing for storms are listed below: 

The Roof
During a windstorm, the force of the wind pushes against the outside of your home. That force is passed along from your roof to the exterior walls and finally to the foundation. Homes can be damaged or destroyed when the energy from the wind is not properly transferred to the ground. The first thing you should do is determine what type of roof you have. Homes with gabled roofs are more likely to suffer damage during a hurricane. A gabled roof looks like an A on the ends,with the outside wall going to the top of the roof. The end wall of a home with a gabled roof takes a beating during a hurricane or wind storm, and those that are not properly braced can collapse, causing major damage to the roof.

Exterior Doors and Windows
The exterior walls, doors, and windows are the protective shell of your home. If your home's protective shell is broken, high winds can enter and put pressure on your roof and walls, causing damage. You can protect your home by strengthening the doors and windows.

Double Entry Doors
Most double doors have an active and an inactive or fixed door . Check to see how the fixed door is secured at the top and bottom. The bolts or pins that secure most doors are not strong enough. Some door manufacturers provide reinforcing bolt kits made specifically for their doors. Check with your local building supplies retailer to findout what type of bolt system will work for your door.

Double-wide Garage Doors
Double-wide (two-car) garage doors can pose a problem during storms because they are so large that they wobble as the high winds blow and can pull out of their tracks or collapse from wind pressure. If garage doors fail, high winds can enter your home through the garage and blow out doors, windows, walls, and even the roof.

Check the track on your garage door. With both hands, grab a section of each track and see if it is loose or if it can be twisted. If so, a stronger track should be installed.

Storm Shutters
Installing storm shutters over all exposed windows and other glass surfaces is one of the easiest and most effective ways to protect your home. You should cover all windows, French doors, sliding glass doors, and skylights. There are many types of manufactured storm shutters available. For more information on manufactured shutters, check with your local building supplies retailer. If you install manufactured shutters, follow the manufacturer's instructions carefully.

The recommendations discussed here are not intended to replace local building code requirements or to serve as the only options for protecting your home from hurricane wind damage. For more information on protecting your home from hurricane wind damage, contact your local building official; your local building supply retailer; or a building professional.

Advanced Restoration is a property damage restoration company that is trained and ready to respond to any disaster situation, including wind damage to your home or business. We are a preferred vendor for many insurance carriers and have been serving Long Island and the NY Metro area for 20 years. 

Do you have a property damage situation you need help with? 
Call us today at (800) 693-6263!

 

Tags: wind damage, hurricane tips, property damage, restoration companies, water damage restoration, nassau county restoration, winter storm, cold winter, insurance, restoration, suffolk county restoration, homeowner tips, restoration company, rebuild, home repair, buying a home, weather, nor'easter

203(k) Re-hab/Restoration Loans- What Can You Do?

Posted on Wed, Apr 22, 2009 @ 01:45 PM

Pursuing an FHA 203(k) loan enables homebuyers and homeowners to finance both the purchase (or refinancing) of a house and the cost of its rehabilitation through a single mortgage or to finance the rehabilitation of their existing home.

The extent of the rehabilitation covered by a 203(k) may range from relatively minor (minimum of $5000 in cost) to virtual reconstruction: a home that has been demolished or will be restored as part of rehabilitation is eligible.
Section 203(k) insured loans can finance the rehabilitation of the residential portion of a property that also has non-residential uses; they can also cover the conversion of a property of any size to a one-to-four unit structure.

The types of improvements that borrowers may make using Section 203(k) financing include:

  • Structural alterations and reconstruction
  • Modernization and improvements to the home's function
  • Elimination of health and safety hazards
  • Changes that improve appearance and eliminate obsolescence
  • Reconditioning or replacing plumbing; installing a well and/or septic system
  • Adding or replacing roofing, gutters, and downspouts
  • Adding or replacing floors and/or floor treatments
  • Major landscape work and site improvements
  • Enhancing accessibility for a disabled person
  • Making energy conservation improvements

Advanced Restoration Corporation is located in New York and is a general contractor/ restoration company that specializes in the rehabilitation of homes in disrepair. We are affiliated with various mortgage companies and have experience with contractor requirements associated with a 203 (k) loan.
For more information on partnering with an experienced company ready to rebuild your dream house, contact Gary Matzelle at (516)903-4107. Service area includes: Nassau County, Suffolk County, Queens, Manhattan, Staten Island, Brooklyn and The Bronx.

Tags: disaster, 203(k) loan, fire restoration, water damage restoration, mold, smoke damage, advanced restoration, advanced restoration corporation, reconstruction, disrepair, rebuild, water leaks, weather

Winter Is Coming

Posted on Wed, Nov 05, 2008 @ 01:23 PM

WINTER FORECASTS
How accurate were they?

Some winters can be tougher than the NFL football season!

Last year, Long Island had a relatively mild winter and readings from LI Mac-Arthur Airport related to the Winter of 2007-2008 indicated:

Mean temperature: 34.2 degrees vs. normal temperature based on 30-year average: 33.7 degrees.


Last year’s overall predictions for winter of ’07-’08:

  • National Weather Service: Above average temperatures for most of the U.S.
  • AccuWeather Inc.: Marginally warmer than normal
  • WSI Inc.: Warmer than usual
  • Weather 2000 Inc.: Slightly cooler than 10-year average, warmer than 30-year average
  • The Farmers Almanac: “Two-faced winter” for the nation, with extremes of warm and dry, and cold and wet, varying by region
  • The Old Farmers Almanac: Warmer than normal, but slightly colder than winter of ‘06-‘07

Could this winter's weather add to our economic woes on Long Island?
As homeowners across the country pray for a mild winter to offset rising energy costs, the world-famous Farmers’ Almanac is warning us to prepare for the worst. “Numb’s the word!” is how the 192-year-old publication is predicting the upcoming winter season. For 2008–2009, the Farmers’ Almanac is forecasting a “numbing” winter, with below-average temperatures for at least two-thirds of the country. Only the Far West and Southeast will see near-normal temperatures. Few, if any, locations will enjoy many above-normal temperature days this upcoming season.

Snow?
Precipitation-wise, most of the South, as well as the Midwest, should experience above-normal conditions, while the rest of the nation will average close to normal. With below-normal winter temperatures and an above-normal precipitation forecast, the Great Lakes and Midwest will see above-normal snowfalls, especially during January and February. Above-normal precipitation is forecast for the Southwest during December 2008 and for the Southeast in January and February 2009. It should also turn out to be an unusually wet and/or snowy February across the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic.

The other long-range forecasts for the impending winter season were predicting mostly above-normal temperatures nationwide, with no prolonged spells of cold weather, and limited precipitation.

The Farmers’ Almanac, in contrast, predicted that it would be a "two-faced" winter, with warm and dry extremes balancing extremes of cold and wet. For those of you who live in the Midwest, northern New England, and parts of the West, last winter was anything but mild and warm. Snowfall records were broken, and winter seemed as if it would never end.

Highlights from last winter:

  • The average temperature across the contiguous U.S. during the climatological winter (December 2007–February 2008) was the coolest since 2001.
  • Above-average winter precipitation was the norm for the Midwest and parts of the West.
  • Snowfall was also above normal in northern New England, where some locations posted all-time record winter snow totals. (Find out which towns broke records).

Long-range weather predictions are created almost two years in advance and are based on a formula that has proven to be dependable. People who follow the forecasts claim the accuracy rate is about 80–85%.

For more details on last year and this year's weather, get the 2009 Farmers' Almanac.

Check out other major weather events accurately predicted by the Farmers’ Almanac

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